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TO or FOR? Prepositions in English
 
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http://www.engvid.com 'To' and 'for' are prepositions that are often confused. Although they are used in almost all situations, many people do not know which one to use in which situation. This grammar lesson will give you some tips on how to choose the correct one to make your speech and writing smoother. Take the quiz on this lesson here: http://www.engvid.com/to-or-for/ Hi again. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam, and today's lesson is about prepositions; everybody's favourite little words that get in the middle of everything and cause you lots of troubles, and headaches, and confusion. Especially if you're writing, this is the worst part, but even if you're not; always causes problems. Today's prepositions that we're going to look at: "to" and "for". Now, there isn't really a set rule for these prepositions; they can be used in many different ways. What I'm going to try to show you today is when to use "to" instead of "for", when to use "for" instead of "to". Now, to do that, we first have to look at why or situations in which we use these prepositions. So let's start. If you want to express a reason, - okay? -, then you're going to use "to" or "for". "I went to the store", why? "To buy milk." "I went to the store", why? "For milk." What's the difference between these two? Should be very clear I think. Here I have a verb, here I'm only talking about the noun so we use "to". Now, technically, this is not a preposition. Okay? This is an infinitive verb marker, but it looks like a preposition so we'll treat it as one for now. Verb, noun, that's the difference when you're talking about reason. Now, before we go to the next one, I want you to look at this: "I went to the store", whenever you have sort of a movement, - sorry -, and you have a destination... So by movement I mean: "go", "walk", "drive", "take the bus", for example. Anything that involves you moving or going somewhere and then you're talking about the destination, - means the place that you are going to -, it's always going to be "to". And this is very much a preposition showing direction. Okay? Now, there are of course exceptions. There are situations where you can use "for". "Head for the hills", "Make for the lobby", okay? But very, very specific situations, very specific verbs and you're not going to use them that often because they're not as common. Easier to just use "go", okay? Next: if you want to point out a recipient. What is a recipient? A person who receives something. Okay? "Give this to her.", "This is for her." Now you're thinking: "Well, her, her, what's the difference? They look exactly the same." So here is why I wrote: "verb". In this situation, you're not worried about the preposition, you're worried about the verb. In this case: "give", in this case: "is". Okay? When you... Again, when you have motion... And here, "her" or the person is like a destination; it's not a place, but it's the recipient. Recipient is similar to a destination except you have place and person. Okay? If you have motion and recipient, use "to". When you have situation, then you're going to use "for". Okay? So it all depends on the verb, not the preposition. Now, another example: "Can you send this fax to her?" "Send" means motion, you're going to be doing something, you're going to be moving something. "I made this cake for her." "Made" -- you're not moving anything, nothing's changing hands. Right? You made it, this is the situation and it's for her. Eventually she will be the recipient. "I made this for her. Can you give it to her?" Right? So I'm using both: one motion "to", situation "for".
Easy English Lesson: turn on, turn off, turn up, turn down
 
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In this English lesson for beginners, I will teach you the correct expressions to use to talk about your gadgets. We often use 'turn' phrasal verbs to talk about using gadgets or electronics. By the end of the lesson, you will know how to use the prepositions 'ON', 'OFF', 'UP', and 'DOWN' with the verb 'TURN'. This is an easy lesson, but many students make mistakes using these words. Don't be one of them! Watch my video, then take the quiz at: http://www.engvid.com/easy-english-lesson-turn-on-turn-off-turn-up-turn-down/ TRANSCRIPT Doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo. Hello. Hi. James from engVid. You might have noticed that my voice changed. I went from soft to loud. Now, many students I find have a problem when it comes to electronics. They don't know whether they should use, or if they should use "up", "down", "on", or "off". Today is a basic lesson on those things. So, let's go to the board and take a look. Now, when we talk about electronics, which could be something as simple as your cellphone-okay?-what happens is people want to use them, which is fine if you're doing it for yourself, but when you're talking to other people and you want them to do something for you. You notice that this cellphone is, would you say "down" or "off"? All right? That's the lesson we're going to do today. What do you say when you want to change the condition of this cellphone? We'll start right now. E, so are we going to turn up the volume or turn on the volume? Well, I notice "dunh-dunh-dunh-dunh-dunh-dunh-dunh-dunh-dunh" the music is already on. This is low volume and this is high volume, but how do we change them? Let's start with some basic definitions. First, "turn", that was a turn. It's to move around a centre. Here's a centre, I turn around a centre, or to reverse a position. Interesting. Both of these definitions we need to understand if we say: "turn up" or "turn on". The first one, to turn around a centre, we have to go back in time a little bit. You're from the Modern Age, so when you press your toys, you just press. But when I was a little boy a long time ago, when the Indians rode on the plains... I'm not that old, but I feel that way. What happened was we used to have televisions and radios, and we would turn, we would turn them if we wanted more volume. So if you look over here, where I said turn means to reverse a position, you have 360. So, I feel like we're doing an old science lesson. And boys and girls, we will now demonstrate the turning mechanism. Here we go. We will turn up the power, and turn down the power. Which means reverse. So we're going to look here, and you notice I have to turn. Okay? This is a very old machine. Some of you won't recognize this. It's a film projector. Yeah, we don't use these now. Anyway. But the point was: The technology, you had to actually do something with it, and that's where we get the ideas for "up", "down", "on", and "off". We're switching. We're either reversing the position or moving around a centre. Now, when you have a lot of movement or 360, which is basically a circle... All right? When you have a circle, this is why we talk about turning up and down, because as you turn it, you can increase the power or decrease the power, or make the sound higher or make the sound lower. In fact, in the old days, they used to do this for television, radios, and lights. You would turn up and you would increase it so it would get more. So here's the 360, or you would go more, more, more, more, more. Or you would turn it down and decrease it and you would get less, less, less, less. So the room could be darker if you're talking about light. If sounds all of a sudden the voice would get lower, lower and disappear. Okay. So that's why when we talk about volume on televisions or radios, we say: "Hey, could you turn up the volume?" And if you think about this machine, okay? Turn up the volume, turn down the volume.
English Grammar: The Prepositions ON, AT, IN, BY
 
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English for Beginners: Prepositions are short words that help us express location, time, and other relationships between people and things. Some examples of prepositions are: on, at, in, and by. Do you know how to use them? For example, do we say, "I am on a taxi" or "in a taxi"? Do you like to travel "in a plane" or "by plane"? After watching this simple but useful lesson, you will know exactly which preposition to use in any situation. Test yourself with our quiz: http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-the-prepositions-on-at-in-by/ TRANSCRIPT I'm having a hard time reading on the train right now. Unh. Hold on. I'll start the lesson. Hi. James from engVid. Sorry, I was on the train. I want to teach you a lesson about four basic prepositions that we use in English that sometimes get confused, and I understand why, so I'll keep it basic. But because it's basic, it's going to be 80% correct. That's a good thing, that means you can go to the website and learn more from other lessons we have. But just know that sometimes there'll be exceptions, and I may not cover it here today. I'll even give you two exceptions to help you, but why waste time? Let's go to the board. Here's Mr. E. You'll notice he has a calendar, he has a clock, and: "You are here"? Oh, here. "Here" is a location. We're here right now, doing a lesson. That's the location: engVid. Let's go to the board and do the rest of the lesson, shall we? Here's: "at", "on", "in", and "by". "At". I love it because it's very specific, so you always know where you are, exactly. Problem: For transportation, "at" doesn't have anything. Hmm. So let's go to the next one. Let's go to "on". On. "On" is used for, let's say, large vehicles or large ways of travelling, such as buses... Sorry. Trains, buses, planes, and boats. I'll come back to boat in a second; it's an exception. On the train, on the bus, and on the plane, unless you're Bill Gates, Donald Trump, or me-I'm not in that list-you don't have your own train, plane, or bus, so you usually share it with a bunch of people or a few people. It's large. So we say: "You're on the bus", because it covers a big area, so there are many people sitting in that area. When I get to location, you'll see what I mean. Boat is a small exception. For many people in the world, they have their own boats because maybe they do fishing, or rowing, which is a type of boat that you go by yourself. In that situation, you can use "in". So, if the boat is small enough, say: "in": "I'm in a boat right now." But if it's a big boat, you have to say: "I'm on a boat." Another exception for the "on" rule is bicycle. You're always "on" a bicycle. I know, I said big vehicles, but remember: a bicycle is small, and it doesn't really have a motor or an engine, so we kind of give it its own thing, because you have to sit on the bicycle, and you can never really be in a bicycle. Is that good? Now, let's go to "in". "In" is funny because there are only two things for "in". "In" we use for car and taxi. The easy way to think about it is usually you own your own car; it doesn't belong to a group of people. People just don't get on your car every time you stop it, they go in and say: "Take me somewhere." And a taxi, well, when you're in a taxi, it is kind of your car. You pay the driver and you keep the car. So, this is one of those few cases where, because it belongs to me, I am in my car or I am in the taxi, because the taxi belongs to me as long as I pay the money. It's one of these funny exceptions. I don't know why, because you can put more people in a car, but I guess because you can actually own this transportation, it's yours. Think of it like the small boat. The small boat, one person is in it, you can be inside of it. All right? Cool. The last one we're going to do is "by". This is how you get there. So, "by" is different. When we talk about "in" and "on", you are... We are talking about how you are in the vehicle. Are you sitting on the bicycle? I can see you on it? You know, a boat is on water. But "by" just means: How did you get here? So, when someone responds to you with: "By car", "by plane", they're telling you how they got here. Not if they're in the plane, or on the plane. They are just... That's how they got there. So, how did I get here to do this video? Wouldn't you like to know. I'm kidding. I came here by car. So, yes, I was in my car and drove here, but I would tell somebody: "I got here by car, not by bus", and that would tell them the difference in the transportation I took. "How did you get here?" You like that? Good, so that's "by", this is how you did it; and the way you travelled is here, "in" and "on". Remember there is a small exception for small vehicles, so a small boat you can be in. Remember small. And a bicycle, you're always on the bicycle, because people see you sitting on it. We good? Excellent. Now, that is the lesson for transportation.
EITHER, NEITHER, SO, TOO - How to agree and disagree in English
 
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http://www.engvid.com Are you confused by words such as "too", "either", "neither", and "so"? Do you ever agree with an opinion that you really don't share? Or disagree when in fact you think the same thing? Sometimes this happens because you are not sure of which words to use to agree or disagree. After this grammar lesson, you should be able to get your opinion across more easily. Test yourself with the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/either-neither-so-too/
Grammar Mistakes - LIE or LAY?
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ "Lay" and "lie" are two of the most commonly confused words in the English language. Watch this lesson to learn the difference between these words, along with tricks to ensure that you don't confuse them again. At the end of the video, take the quiz so you can test your understanding. http://www.engvid.com/lie-or-lay/
"I seen it" and other stupid mistakes
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ I'm sure "you seen" it before, but that doesn't make it right. This lesson will help you understand and correct three very common grammar mistakes that even many native English speakers make every day. Test your understanding of this lesson with the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/i-seen-it-and-other-stupid-mistakes/
5 conversation phrasal verbs you need to know
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ These 5 phrasal verbs are used every day by native speakers to help them "catch up" with friends and "work out" problems at home and work. Study this video and you won't ever feel cut off in a conversation. Take a quiz on this lesson here: http://www.engvid.com/5-conversation-phrasal-verbs/ TRANSCRIPT Okay, James. Product placement right about now. Apple Computers, take one. Hi. James from EngVid. Yeah. We're getting sponsored by Apple. "Sponsored" means someone is paying you to do something. No, it's not the case. And just so you know, this is the cheap version that's old. One of you guys made a guess last time I held it up. You're like, "It's the Apple 5 with retinal scan!" I don't even know what that is, so don't ask me. Okay? So -- but Mr. E and I, we get to work on my computer, and we're going to tell a story. Mr. E, ready? Okay. So "Mr. E helped to blank blank my new computer. It's not new. It something something well, and we finished early. However, it something something Mr. E had forgotten to pay his electric bill, so the power was something something -- wow, a lot of 'something somethings'. We sat in the -- excuse me. We sat in the dark" -- stop. The end. This is a stupid story. I'm going to try and do a better story. Mr. E, help me, okay? Now, Mr. E -- first of all, I should tell you what this is about. I'm giving you five phrasal verbs that are commonly used in conversation that will help you have, you know, a more interesting conversation, but not just that. Because these are used commonly in conversation, you can understand what people are saying because I'm going to try and teach you not just one --no sirree Bob! We're having a sale today. James's sale -- you're going to get two for the price of one meaning, so you can understand this story, but when you're done, you can go back and actually build your own stories or usages, okay? So let's go to the beginning. "Mr. E helped me to something at my new computer." Well laptops are different. You just put it in a room. In the old days and even now, some people buy big computers, and they have speakers and they have the box and, you know, the big screen. And you have to put it somewhere. Well, when you put it somewhere, you know, you want to arrange or build a system. We call that a "set up". You set it up. It means to put it or arrange it in a way you can use it. You "set up" a business, right? It's a system, you know. You know you buy; you sell -- it's a system. So setting something up is to arrange it or organize it or build a thing that you can use. That's one definition, "set up". What's the second one?" To place somebody in an awkward situation". Interesting. Sometimes you're watching the movies -- I'm sure you watch many of them -- someone will say, "He set me up that so-and-so." Well, what it means is they knew something about the person; they pretended they didn't know; then, they got other people to come around to expose or get the truth out. That's called a "setup". The police "set up" criminals all the time, right? They pretend to buy drugs. They pretend, but they don't actually want to buy them. The criminal sells them, and then they catch them. And they say, "It was a setup from the beginning", and the police go, "Yeah, and you fell for it." When you "fall" for something, you believe it's true even though it's not, okay? So "set up" here means two things: to arrange a system; that's one thing, and that's what we did with my computer system. It's not an awkward situation. We've arranged and built a system, right? So let's set up. Let's go back. Mr. E helped me to set up my new computer. That means we put it on a table, got the speakers, plugged it in, made it work. Cool, right? Next, "It w___ o___ well and we finished early." "W___ o___ well" -- what could that be? W-o, w-o. Well, look. See this other arrow comes down here. What does that mean? Well, it means fix a problem -- or couples fix a relationship -- and come to a successful end. Well, what we're talking about is work because when you have a problem you must work, right? To come to a successful end means you must do some work first to come to the end. Running a race; making dinner; fixing a problem. Fixing a problem requires work. Couples have to work on a relationship. And we also have this "this worked out". And if you're like Arnold Schwarzenegger, you have big muscles because you work out. That's my best Arnold impersonation. Okay, so Arnold works out, but that's different. So we also say -- and I should've put it here -- "go to gym", right? Because a lot of times I hear foreign students say, "Teacher, we go exercising now." And I always go, "[laugh] You go exercise. Right." North Americans, English speakers, they "work out". That's what we do when we go to the gym. It is exercising, but that's our word. Be here we say, "It worked out well".
Reading skills that work - for tests and in class
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Do you run out of time when reading in class? Have trouble remembering or understanding what you read? Then put down that book and press play to learn how to improve your reading speed and comprehension today. http://www.engvid.com/reading-skills-that-work/
Instantly improve your English with 3 easy words!
 
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Improve how you sound in English by mastering when these three words are used! I've met thousands of English learners at all levels. Most of them, even the advanced students, make mistakes with the words "a", "the", and "to". These are some of the most common words we use, so in this lesson I'm going to teach you how we use these words. I don't want to look just at grammar; I want you to understand these words and why we use them. If you're an advanced English student, this will be a great review for you. If you're a beginner, try to understand this and save yourself years of English mistakes. TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/instantly-improve-your-english-with-3-easy-words/ TRANSCRIPT Doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo. The things I do for love. There's not a thing... Hi. James from engVid. Today's lesson is about instantly improving. Now, I know... "Instant", what does that mean? People say it all the time. I want to show you a little trick that will make your English sound better instantly, and I will give you a technique that you can use after to help practice this. What I have found are students have a mistake or make a mistake when they drop these three words, and because of that I know you're not a native speaker. But today I'm going to address that, show you the three words... Okay? Explain why, and then I will give you a technique that you can use at home soon as you go back over this video or any video to practice it, and you will get instantly better. 10-20%. Okay? Want to know what I'm talking about? Let's go to the board and look at something you've learned, but today you're going to understand. You ready? So, Mr. E said: "Which three words can help you sound like a native speaker?" I'm going to help you a little bit by doing this, and then we're going to go to the board. The words I'm talking about, and you might not consider them words but they are words are: "a" or "an"... Okay, and I consider that one word because it's modified. Right? "The" and "to". Of course you're going to say: "Yeah, James, we know all these. We learned this at beginner, so how does that instantly help me improve my English?" The problem is this: When a person knows something they will talk, when they understand they will change their behaviour or they will use the information. Many students know about articles and the preposition "to", but they actually don't use them in sentences. Many times I've heard students go... Say: "I need to go work tonight." Soon as you say that I know you're not a native speaker. Or if they say: "I bought car yesterday" or "I bought food..." Not "some food". "I bought apple yesterday at the store." I'm like: "A-... You mean an apple, right?" They don't think to say it, because they know: "Teacher, you know what I'm saying." And I go: "Yeah, I know what you're saying, but the way you said it I know English is not your first language." So what I want to do is get you to come back to understanding, not just knowing why these words are important, the fact that, especially with the articles we're going to talk about, they are in most of the sentences. You can almost not get by a sentence without using them. So let's go to the board and take a look. First, what is an article? Well, you'll see an article is the letter "a" or "an". Quickly on that one, "an" is used when we have a vowel sound, sound... Not a... Not just a vowel. So when you say: "A apple", we know "a" and "a" make it difficult for us to actually get it out and for you to understand, so we add: "an" to put a consonant to make it easier for the listener. "I want an apple." Oh, okay, cool. How about "hour"? Teacher, that has an "h" in front of it. I'm like: "Enh?" But we say: "hour", we don't say: "h-our", because with "a" we have to say: "an hour", and that once again tells me one hour. You keep noticing I keep saying "one". I'll explain in a second. Now, this is what we call and indefinite article. I.e. it's not special. When I say to you: "I want a marker", a marker. All right? I'm talking about this. See this? They're all basically the same. I don't care what type of marker. "A" just means generally speaking marker. That's why it's indefinite; it's not special. When we look at the word "the", "the" is special. In this case, when I say to you: "I want the marker", which one do you think I'm talking about? Can you see the difference? Clearly. Even if you don't know, you would look and see four, and see this and go: "He's probably talking about this one." So with a definite article what's happening is someone is being very specific. Well, there are two things. They could say something is special or something is specific. Okay? And here we have definite article is "the". "Tell the man I like him." Okay? "Tell the man", in this case both of us have to know what you're talking about, because if there are 10 men you'll go: "Which man?"
Assume or Presume?
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Many times students "presume" that their bad grammar in English is correct because they base it on false "assumptions". If you never want to be so "presumptuous", WATCH THIS VOCABULARY LESSON! Then TAKE THE QUIZ: http://www.engvid.com/assume-or-presume/
Get Fluent With 1 Trick - Become A Confident English Speaker With This Simple Practice Trick
 
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Start speaking fluent English confidently - http://www.bit.ly/2gupuGO Did you know that there’s just 1 simple trick to becoming a fluent English speaker? Just 1 thing you must change about the way you learn to… Have your words came out naturally and automatically – without hesitation – as if English were your first language, every time you speak… Express your exact thoughts spontaneously, continuously and in detail, without being forced to change what you want to say – or only speak in simple sentences – because you can’t find the right words… Understand everything you hear in English movies, TV shows, music and conversations, and finally speak confidently – without ever feeling nervous or worried about mistakes – with the smooth pronunciation of a native speaker… And best of all, this 1 easy change in the way you learn will help you experience immediate improvement in your spoken English so you’ll finally be certain that you’re learning the right way. But before I reveal this trick, I’d like you to know why so many English learners have problems with their English and struggle to become fluent Speakers… Why do so many English learners often use words that sound unnatural in conversations? What’s the reason they often have to think about what grammar rules to use before speaking? What stops them from speaking smoothly and clearly? The answer to all of these questions is, in 3 words… How They Learn You see, traditional language learning methods only give English learners part of the fluency puzzle… Lessons teach them grammar rules, but not how to use grammar without thinking when they speak. Students learn English through their own language, so they’re trained to hesitate and translate in their heads during conversations. They learn to read and write the formal English of textbooks, but get very little training listening to – and speaking – casual, conversational, spoken English. So, what is the 1 simple trick to becoming a successful English speaker? It’s to learn English like native speakers. Fluency is nothing more than a collection of habits, like using grammar without thinking, or pronouncing words correctly. So, all you need to do to develop the same habits native speakers have is to learn the same way native speakers learn… When you learn English like native speakers, you master grammar automatically – without grammar tables and boring drills – through visual examples and stories. Building fluency like a native speaker means you also learn slang, idioms, phrasal verbs and other conversational, spoken English expressions, in addition to what’s appropriate for writing. Learning English the native way means you learn to speak fluent English naturally, actually practicing with native English speakers and building speaking confidence in the real world. When you learn this way, it’s easy, fun, fast and doesn’t feel like studying at all, just like how you learned your own native language… Now that you know that you must change the way you learn if you want to get fluent – because the traditional methods you’ve been using until now have not helped you become a confident speaker – how can you start developing the habits of a native English speaker so you can start speaking fluent English confidently? With EnglishAnyone.com's English Fluency Training Video Course: Master English Conversation 2.0. Master English Conversation 2.0 was designed by learners for learners with everything you need to finally… Master even complicated grammar points without confusing grammar tables or boring drills so you can use grammar without hesitation when you speak… Understand everything native speakers say and build a vocabulary of real, conversational words and expressions to start speaking naturally and correctly… Improve your pronunciation and sound like a native speaker… Develop the habit of speaking and responding spontaneously in real situations… Overcome shyness, meet native English speakers online and in the real world to practice speaking with, and build speaking confidence… Click on the link below to begin getting fluent the simple, easy way, just like native speakers, with a 100% guaranteed English conversation and fluency course – including 5 valuable, exclusive bonuses to help you get fluent even faster – available now for over 60% off. You can begin learning immediately… today… with this fully-downloadable program, and start experiencing immediate improvement in your understanding, speaking and fluency. Click on the link below now to get started. I look forward to seeing you in Master English Conversation 2.0! Start speaking fluent English confidently - http://www.englishanyone.com/speak-fluent-english-confidently-in-6-months-ea9/
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Fix Your Bad English
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Read this: After watching this video you will make less mistakes, learn farther and be the best between all your friends in English. The lesson will have a great affect on you. If you think these statements are correct, PRESS PLAY NOW and learn to fix six common mistakes in English. http://www.engvid.com/6-ways-to-fix-your-bad-english/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. James, from EngVid. Today's video is on, well, "The Book of Bad English". There are mistakes that native speakers make that ESL people pick up -- and "ESL" is "English as a Second Language". People learning English, they pick up because native speakers don't even know they're making this mistake. So I want to teach you six common ones that come regularly or happen regularly in conversation. And I want you to learn them and make your English perfect. Let's go to the board. Now, let's start with No. 1, one of my favorite ones: "amount" and "number". "Amount" is, sort of, like, "how much". A "number" is, you know, "thing". When we look at "amount", you can think of you can't count it, all right? A lot of times, when we say "amount" -- like, "I have a large amount of water in my house" -- you can't count water. But you can count a number, so: "The number of people who come to the city is in the thousands", so you can count them. Here's an example. Tell me if this is right or wrong. "The amount of students who are late is growing every day" or "the number of students who are late is growing every day." You should say "number" because you can count students. You can't count amount. That rhymes. Maybe that'll help, right? You can't count amount. You can't count amount. So when we want to talk about a number of something or a body of something, "amount" is for things you cannot count, and "number" is for things you can count. English people make this mistake a lot. Next: "among" and "between". When I used to teach "among" and "between", I would say, "'Among' is 'with'. So there're five chairs, and you're 'with' another. And 'between' is you're in the middle." That's it. Because I was so smart. And then I found out it's just this: two. More than two. That's it. Nothing special. When you talk about "between", except -- and this is a major exception -- when you're talking about differences. Differences you have to use "between". But generally speaking, "among" is more than two. "I was sitting among my friends at the bar." You can know there're probably four or five, not two. But "let's keep this between you and me"? A lot of times, Canadians say, "Let's keep this among us." And it's like, "Among who?" "The rest of those guys, you know. The Americans. They don't need to know this." Okay. So "between us" -- usually two, right? It could be two groups. "There was a fight between this country and that country." Right? Because it's two groups. But "among" is for more than two, cool? All right. So "among" -- more than two; "between" -- two. What about "bring" and "take"? This is something that a lot of students make a mistake on. So you say, "Bring this to me" or "take this to him." It's very easy. "Bring" is "to the speaker", okay? And "take" is "away from the speaker". Now, if you're born in England, that's easy because they always talk about "I want takeaway." Takeaway. Because they take the food away from the restaurant, right? So one of my favorite sayings that we say in England -- not England -- that we say here is, like -- watch every space movie: "Take me to your leader." You'll never see a space movie, unless it's made by me -- and it would say, "Bring me to your leader." We don't do that. You say, "Take them to the leader" because you're taking them away from this spot where the speaker is to a new location or spot. So "take" and "bring" are easy because it's "bring -- come towards". Here's a mistake -- not Canadians -- English speakers make that you should be aware of. They'll say something like, "Don't forget to bring your bag with you" instead of, "Don't forget to take your bag." Do you know what the difference is? Well, you're leaving, right? So you need to take it away. Remember I said "away from"? Take the bag away from you. When you say, "Bring the bag with you", the speaker's speaking, you're still moving away from the speaker, right? So you've got to use this. But Canadians and Americans and Brits say it a lot. They'll say, "Bring it with you." No. "Take" it with you. You know the difference now because you're smart. And you're studying from The Book of Bad English. Good for you. There's a worm in that book. Watch it. Okay. "Fewer" or "less". I'm going to make a statement, and think which one is correct. "'Fewer' than a million people have watched the videos on EngVid. 'Less' than a million people have watched the videos on EngVid." Which one would be correct? Yeah. If you said "less than", no. "Less" is similar to "amount". You say "fewer" for things you can count.
Learn English Grammar: Modals - "could" or "should"?
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Expectation is what we think could or should happen. But COULD and SHOULD are not the same! This important grammar lesson will teach you how to use these modals correctly, like a native English speaker. You SHOULD take the quiz to test yourself! http://www.engvid.com/learn-english-grammar-modals-could-or-should/ TRANSCRIPT What's up, Mr. E? We could be finished in 20 minutes, is that right? Oh, hi. James, from EngVid. Mr. E and I were talking about something. We're having a little disagreement. Well, not a disagreement, but a conversation. I think this lesson could be about five, ten minutes. He said it should be 15. That's a standard lesson length. What's the difference? I don't know. Why don't we go to the board and find out? If this looks familiar, it should be. This is the -- "it should be". See? This is the second lesson of modals that we're doing. The first one we did was excuses. Yeah? You could've taken that lesson. If you haven't, close this one down; watch that; and come back to this one. This one is actually on expectation. You know? Sometimes, people make excuses for not doing stuff. And other times, our expectations are what we think should happen in the future or could happen. This lesson will help you find out how native speakers use modals in a little different way than you're used to or in the usual grammar setting. Okay? So let's go to the board. Once again, quickly we'll go over it. What do modals do? Well, modals talk about obligations or possibilities, right? Possibility indicates future. Future. When we talk about what's possible. An obligation is what you should do. So if you mix those together, that's what an expectation is -- is what is possible and what we think people or things should do or happen. Right? Your obligation or the obligation. But let's take a look at this here. Let's go to the board, okay? First of all, when we talk about modals, which I've just done -- you know, they express future possibility or obligations. Let's look at the verb "to be" or the Be verb. The Be verb is about relative truth. And you're probably going to say to me, "What the hell is relative truth?" Well, relative truth is somebody believes it's true, and it depends where you sit. Right now, you're looking at me, and I'm a tall guy. I'm skyscraper tall. I'm a giant. But only if you're this tall. If you can't see me, it's because I'm a very tiny little man looking up at Big James. Understand? So relatively speaking, if you're this big, anything this big is big. But anything this big, big, big, big, big, big is bigger than this. Understand? "Relative" means it depends on who is looking at it, right? If you're 60, 40 is young. If you're 40 years old, 20 is young. And if you're 10, they're all old, okay? Relative truth. Where do you sit? So that's what the Be verb means. So once we put a modal, okay, with the Be verb, it changes it. It gives it a different meaning. And what we want to look at now is what does that mean, this change, or how does it change it? And the video before, I mentioned, we noticed how we use it for excuses. In this one, we're going to see how we think the future should be or could be, all right? Let's go. So what is -- the modal should mean? Well, "should" is what we usually think -- "should" is what is right, okay? We think it is right or probable, most likely to happen, or the correct or right thing to do. That's why we use it as an advice modal. "You should go to school. You should eat your dinner. You should shut up." Okay? We use it as advice. The last one is strong advice. Okay? And "could" is possible. What's possible? You could be talking to me live if you come to Canada. Or you could be dreaming this whole thing. Press reset and see if that's the case. But no. "Could" is what's possible -- possible to happen, okay? Now, if you add this Be verb to "should", we get this particular thing. See, here's the Be verb because Be is believe, remember? Your perspective; what you believe. "I should + be -- I believe this is right or probable." "You should be a better student. I believe this. And I think it's possible -- probable or right. If you studied harder" -- by saying "studied harder", I think this is what is probable or the correct thing. Right? But "possible", which is similar, but not the same -- let's not forget -- it's what's possible. "I believe this is possible." "I believe we could be the greatest nation on Earth", says Obama. He should've said something else. Notice I didn't say "should be"; I said "shoulda". Different. Anyway. So here, we've got what is possible versus what is probable. It seems simple and easy, and it is. So why don't we just use one? And there's a reason for it. Remember, I said this one has "probable" and "right"? And that's with "should"? Well, when people say "should" in English -- like, "you should be" versus "could be" -- what is actually we think is more accurate or more likely to happen.
English Vocabulary Pyramid - VENT - adventure, convenient, eventually...
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Learning English can be really conVENIent, and I want you to study this lesson so that eVENTually you will master English vocabulary... and have a great adVENTure at the same time! VENTure to take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/vocabulary-pyramid-vent/
Learn English: MAKE or DO?
 
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"Stop making mistakes" or "stop doing mistakes? "Do" and "make" are some of the most used verbs in English, but they are regularly confused by English learners. I'm going to teach you the logic of when to use "make" and when to use "do". Watch this lesson and you'll understand how to use these verbs correctly. You'll also learn collocations: words that often go with "make" and "do", like "do the dishes", "do your homework", "make dinner", "make a call", and many more. Learning to use these two simple words correctly will make you sound much more fluent to native English speakers, so don't miss out! https://www.engvid.com/make-or-do/ TRANSCRIPT "To be or not to be?" that is the qu-... No, it's not the question. You are here to learn a lesson. Hi. I'm James from engVid, and today's lesson is going to be on "do" or "make". Well, why am I doing this lesson? Many students make a mistake with these two verbs. Okay? And the problem is native speakers almost never make this mistake, and as soon as you make this mistake we will know that you are just learning English or low-level English. So this lesson will help you fully understand how to use it so that you can start speaking like a native speaker right away. Now, in order to do that we have to clearly know what the difference is between "do" and "make", and then give examples of how we use them. I'll also give you collocations. Collocations are words that go with "do" and "make" regularly so you know even if you're having a difficult time, when you say something like: "cake", you're going to say "do" or "make". Let's find out in five seconds, shall we? Let's go to the board where I'll break down what "do" is and give you examples; what "make" is, give you examples; then I'll give you those collocations and a short quiz. All right. E, what is it, "do" or "make"? When I makes me a cake, do I do me a cake or make me a cake? Well, let's find out. If an action is repetitive, something you do on a regular basis, we're going to use the verb "do". Now, I should note very quickly here I am not going to talk on the auxiliary, like: "Do you like that?" I'm not going to ask these questions. We have other videos, so please go to engVid, go check them out, and they'll clearly do... Do, [laughs]. Show you the uses of "do" as the auxiliary. Okay? This is specifically how you understand it. If something is done repetitively, we use "do", which is true for most simple present verbs. When we talk in the simple present it's about repeated actions. So, "do" is no different from that. Okay? Obligation. An obligation might be something like I do homework every night. It's a thing I must do. Okay? So we use it for obligation. Multiple actions. Now, listen to me carefully. "I do the dishes." I'll give you a visual representation or a visual picture of it in a second, but I want you to understand the concept. A lot of times in English we use what's called "shorthand". Instead of saying every verb that I'm going to do, what I do is I use... Or I even said it here, replacing verbs. We put the verb "do" in and it talks about several actions in one go. Here's an example for you: When I do the dishes, I wash them, I dry them, I put them away. Notice there are three verbs. I don't want to say when someone says, like E goes: "Did you do the dishes?" Go: "Yes, I wash the dishes, I dry the dishes, I put the dishes away." They'll go: -"You new to Canada, correct?" -"Yes, very correct." Okay, so I said: "I'll do the dishes" or "I do the dishes". So, even under obligation I said: "I do the dishes every night", that's my obligation. And it's these actions I'm talking about. Repetitive because I do it every night, I repeat it. Okay? Multiple actions, so I've just went through, and replacement of verbs. This is similar to multiple actions, but you can use the verb "to do" to replace one verb, like: "Hey, man. I got to do my hair tonight." That means "fix", that might be cut my hair, it might be wash my hair, but when I got to do my hair, I got to do my hair, and do my nails. That means cut and clean. It's not saying multiple verbs. It's just replacing one verb, but we can put "do" in there and it replaces that verb, and we understand what it means. Is there something you have to do? Okay, I've killed that. Right? So why don't we go to "make"? "Make". "Make" is create, when you create something. Creation comes from it didn't exist and now it does. You create. That's making. And when I say "create", there's a big difference between the two. Okay? Notice when we talked about "do" we talked about repetitive, obligation, multiple actions, dah-dah-dah-dah. It's a verb of action and so is "make", but the difference is this: When I talk about "do", you can't see it. Sorry, you can see it, but you can't touch it. You can see me washing, but you can't touch me washing the dishes. It doesn't make sense.
Present Perfect Continuous Tense VS Past Perfect Continuous Tense ( English Grammar Lesson)
 
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Present Perfect Continuous Tense VS Past Perfect Continuous Tense ( English Grammar Lesson) Present perfect continuous: is used to speak about an action that started in the past and is still on in the present. The action is not completed. Example: I have been working at ABC for 5 years. (I started working 5 years ago, and I am still working currently) Example: I am angry. I have been waiting for you for two hours. (from 2 pm-4 pm I have been waiting) Example: It has been raining since last night. (last night, it started raining at 10 pm and it is still raining this morning) Past perfect continuous: to show that something started in the past and continued until another time in the past. The action is not on in the present. Example: I had been working at ABC for 5 years. (I started working in 2009 and resigned in Dec’14. Now, I am not working at ABC company. So, we use the past perfect continuous) Example: I was angry. I had been waiting for John for two hours. (yesterday, the action of waiting was on for 2 hours) Example: The road was wet. It had been raining for many hours yesterday. (yesterday, the action of raining started and went on for a couple of hours and then stopped. It is not raining in the present)
11 PHRASAL VERBS for talking about MONEY in English
 
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Today I'm going to show you the money! You're going to learn useful phrasal verbs we use in English to talk about money. Most of us love having money and hate spending it. Regardless of how you feel, money plays an important role in all our lives. I chose to teach you some of the most common phrasal verbs we use to talk about saving money, spending money, paying off debt, and using your savings. You'll learn how to speak naturally about money by using these expressions. Know it all? Test yourself with the quiz at: http://www.engvid.com/11-phrasal-verbs-for-talking-about-money-in-english/ TRANSCRIPT Money, money, money is so funny in a rich man's world. Vanity Fair. I'm not a rich man, so I can't afford half of the things in here. Speaking of which, we're talking about money, and in this lesson what I want to do is teach you a bunch of phrasal verbs that we use to talk about spending money, saving money, and paying back debts that we use quite commonly. And I'm going to teach you how to use them, and what they are, and have some fun with you. Are you ready? Let's go to the board. Okay? E, it's not funny, I got no money. E is all, see? Got dollar signs for eyes. You might see that. If you're having a problem, take your screen and enlarge it to full screen, there's a little button. And we actually have a video on that, go check that out if you don't know how to use your YouTube. Okay? Anyway, E's got his eyes... He's got dollar signs for eyes, because he's got money in his hand. And if you're lucky, you have money, too; but when you don't have money, well, it's time to learn some phrases to help you with that. Okay? So, here's our dollar sign, here, and let's start with having money or saving it. Okay? If you're lucky... Well, let's start with just having enough. A lot of people just have enough money. And how do we talk about that in English? Well, what you can say is this: "I'm getting by". "Getting by" means I don't have a lot of money, and I'm surviving. So I can't go on big trips or do anything, but I'm not poor and I don't have zero money, but I have enough to get my food, and pay my rent or my homestay, and pay some other things for me, maybe my cellphone and my internet, but nothing special; no car, no fancy trips, no bling, bling, bling or great jewellery. You know what I mean? So, that's "getting by". It's kind of positive because it means I'm not bad, but it's not fantastic, like: "I'm rich!" Okay? Let's talk about "scrape by", because this is have just enough. When you're scraping by, imagine you have this thing here-okay?-and this thing. And there's gum on here, and you want to get the gum off, you're going to... That's called scraping. And when you scrape, sometimes you'll take a little bit of the paper off with it, just a little bit, when you scrape. In Canada, we have winter, and when we have ice on our windows, we scrape the ice to get rid of it. It's a lot of work, it's not lots of fun. You probably understand the phrasal verb now, right? When you're scraping by, you just have enough money. But unlike "getting by", because notice how we have "get", we have you're getting something, you're given something, which is good, you're getting money, that's why you get by; 'scraping" by means just a little bit. Just enough. And you feel negative. You don't feel good when you're scraping by. Every day is heavy and hard, because you almost don't have enough money to pay for everything. Sorry. You need a job or a better one. Okay. So, what happens? How do we change this, "scraping by"? Why don't we do something like this, why don't we save some money? In English, we have two phrasal verbs you can use for saving money. Notice the up sign: "to save up". When you save up money... Think of it this way: Doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo. You increase your money. You usually save your money up for something big, like a car, a vacation, retirement. And retirement is when you stop working forever. You're older, 65-70, you finish work and you don't want to work again, you want to play golf, or go baseball, go sailing. You retire. So, you save up. These are for big purchases. So, it won't be $100. It'll be $1,000, $10,000, a million dollars. A million dollars. [Laughs] Okay. We have another one for saving, though, and we call it: "put aside". You might have difficulty because probably you've never heard of "aside". This is my side, this is on the other side. Okay? So when we say "aside", it's like here, on the side. On the side is "aside". Okay? Sometimes we speak and say: "I want to make an aside", which means I'm going to give you a direct conversation, but I want to say something a little off to the side.
3 tips for sounding like a native speaker
 
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"That'll be 66 cents please." "Sikysi... what?" Having a hard time understanding native speed English? This lesson will give you some tips on how to sound like a native speaker as well as how to understand what you hear by breaking down expressions into their individual word and sounds. https://www.engvid.com/3-tips-for-sounding-like-a-native-speaker/ TRANSCRIPT Hi again, welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today, I'm going to help you sound a little bit more like a native speaker, hopefully. Students ask me all the time: "How can I sound like a native speaker?" Well, before I say anything, let me just tell you that it will take time and a lot, a lot, a lot of practice. The best way is to live in an English-speaking country, of course, but of course you can do it anywhere, but it takes time; be patient, practice, practice, practice. So we're looking at pronunciation. Let me start with this word: "pronunciation". Not: "pronounciation". It is not a pronoun. A pronoun is: "I", "me", "my", "mine". Pronunciation is how we speak English. So I'm going to give you three tips that will help you sound a little bit more like a native speaker. We're going to start with connecting words. Now, think about your own language, whether you're speaking Spanish or Polish or Chinese, you do this in your language as well. When you're speaking fast, you're taking words and you're squeezing them together; you're connecting them, so one word flows into the next word. That's what we're going to do here. You can connect consonants to consonants. What this means: when a word ends in a consonant... A consonant is "b", "c", "d", "f", "g", etc. A vowel is "a", "e", "i", "o", "u". When a word ends in a consonant and the next word begins with the same consonant, drop the first one. So for example: we do not say: "black coffee", we don't say: "ke, ke". There's only one "k": "bla coffee", "bla coffee." Okay? Practice that. Now, "t" and "d", these are two different consonants, but according to the tongue and the mouth, they almost sound the same so we do the same thing. "Wha do you do?", "Wha do you do?" But again, another thing you have to keep in mind is when we say it fast, we also don't really say "e", we say like a... Sort of like a small... We don't say "o" - sorry -, we say sort of a small "e". "Wha do ye do?" Practice that. "Wha do ye do?" Strange, huh? No "t", "wha", "de ye do?", "Wha de ye do?" That's how a native speaker would say it naturally. Now, another thing is when a word ends in a consonant and the next word begins in a vowel, make sure you roll it in. Right? Roll the consonant into the vowel and separate the syllable before. A syllable is the vowel sounds in a word. Okay? So nobody, like native speakers don't say: "Not at all. Oh no, not at all." We don't say it like that. We say: "Oh, not-at-all.", "Not-at-all.", "Not-at-all." Right? The "t", so this becomes: "No-ta-tall", "No-ta-tall", "Not at all". Okay? Say it quickly, blend the letters one into the next. But again, practice it. Now, for those of you who are going to be taking a test, an English test that involves listening; IELTS, TOEFL, TOEIC, if you're in Canada you're maybe doing a CELPIP test. Okay? This is going to help you on the listening section as well. This is one of the things they're testing. Somebody on the recording will say: "Not-at-all", and you need to cut: "Not at all", you need to understand the separate words, that's part of the test. So practice speaking it, practice listening to it. Another thing we do is we squeeze some words. Okay? Certain words, we don't say all the syllables, we don't even say all the letters. I've heard many students say: "Com-fort-able", "com-fort-able", but native speakers, we don't say this part, we don't say the "or". We say: "Comf-ta-bil", and notice the last sound is like a small tiny, tiny little "i" in there. "Comftabil", "comf-ta-bil", "comftabil". Okay? We don't pronounce the "or": "Comfortable". Nope, don't do that. Another word like that: "Interesting". "In-chre-sting". Find out what the syllables are so: "In-ter" - sorry, my mistake -, "In-ter-rest-ing". If you want to emphasize something, we have a word called: "enunciate". When someone wants to emphasize a word, then they enunciate each syllable; they say each syllable separately. "Oh, that is very in-ter-est-ing." Right? Because I want you to understand that the word is interesting, but in every day speech: "Intresting", "in-tre-sting". "In-ter-est-ing", I have four syllables, when I actually say it naturally, it becomes three syllables and the "t" and the "r" become like a "ch", but that's... We'll talk about that next. Another word: "every". "E-vry". I don't say: "Ev-er-y", I don't say this letter "e", "ev-er-y". "E-vry", "evryone", "evrything", "evry".
Learn English: 3 easy ways to get better at speaking English
 
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There are easy ways to learn English, and here are 3 methods NOT taught in language schools or textbooks. These methods are fun, fast, and easy to learn! You will learn how to make studying English easier, and learn how to spend less time studying. Take this lesson and learn the secrets to getting better in English right now. "The Prosperity Plan." It's empty. Why? Well, hi. James, from EngVid. I have a book, and it says "Prosperity Plan". I know you're here to learn English. This is a book full of secrets on how to make millions of dollars. Empty. That's because when people tell you there's a secret, there's not really a secret; there's a method behind something, and you may not know it, so to you it's a secret, but you know, just like that book, there are no secrets. The only one is hard work. Let's look at the three methods I have for you today in order to learn English, okay? Call them the "Secrets you need to know" because most people don't know them because the funny thing is, although they're not secret -- I said it again -- they're not methods that are usually taught in ESL books. The Kaizen Method, the Process Method, and the Writing Method are actually books I read on something completely different. But what I found was they were very, very handy for learning English. Personally, I'm trying to learn Spanish, and when I apply these different methods, I found my learning going faster and faster, and I actually enjoyed it. So I called them "secret" for you because I'm quite sure that your teachers haven't sat down and gone, "Today, we're going to learn the Kaizen Method of English. Then, we'll do the Process Method, and then we'll do the Writing Method." No. Because they're actually three different books, all right? So I'm just going to give you a part of each book, and if I come across to the end, I'll give you another lesson on it, all right? But these are three things I liked out of these books. All right. Let's start from the first one, the Process Method. I know -- and it's in red, and I start here why? Most of the times people are learning a language, they want to -- and this is what the Process Method is about. People start with "product", "product". What is a "product"? A "product" is something you can touch or hold. This marker is a product. But this isn't how the marker started. I'm sorry. Okay, the marker started a little differently. I mean, that's an alcohol base that I'm sniffing. When I go [inhales], there's liquid in here. This is plastic -- came from oil. So why I'm telling you all these things -- you're going, "Why are you telling me?" Well, things start in a certain way, but they end up like this. In fact, you can think of the Process Method versus product as being a tree and being a seed. And a seed, you know, little thing, you put it in the ground, and it grows into a tree. Well, when you have a seed, the seed has no idea that it's going to be a tree and a big tree -- how long it will take. But humans are funny. They want to start a language, and they think right away, "I'm going to learn English." And then, they sit down; they open the book; they open the book; "I'm going to learn English. I'm learning English. I'm learning English." And then they get upset one hour later. "I don't know any English. I don't speak English." Well, it's like being a human. You start as a baby, you grow to an adult. When we talk about the Process Method, what you want to do is don't think about you want to speak English. Yes, I know. That's why you're watching this video and why you're studying. Think more about what you're doing while you're studying English. And this is called the "process". Go into the step. Concentrate on what you're doing. You'll find a couple of things happen: Sometimes you'll say English is hard or it's boring. If you do this method, you'll actually stop finding it hard or boring, and you'll enjoy it because you'll be working on something specific, mastering that, and then you're going to start noticing that the final product -- English -- is coming to you. And it will come faster than you think. Why? Well, if you're thinking, "I don't understand this English", you're focusing, really, on you don't understand English or you don't know English. You're not focusing on what you're doing. If you take a breath [inhales] and go [exhales], "Okay. I'm just watching this video of this crazy guy who speaks very quickly in English, and just now, he told me to take a breath. Oh, okay. I understand." And you're ahead. That's the Process Method. Take time to actually go back -- when you're thinking about it's hard; it's difficult or boring -- and say to yourself, "What am I doing now?" And then look at that. Each time you do that, you get further in the process and you will end up with a product before you know it. Okay? Sounds simple, but try it. You can even do this on a date. That's another story.
How to improve your English conversation skills
 
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How to start conversations with native speakers and improve your ability to speak English fluently. http://www.engvid.com/
3 common conversation mistakes
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ One of the best ways to improve your conversation skills in English is to avoid mistakes that lead to confusion. This lesson will explain three common conversation mistakes and teach you how you can avoid making them. http://www.engvid.com/3-common-conversation-mistakes/
Confusing English: LIE or LAY? RAISE, RISE, or ARISE?
 
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Today, you'll learn two sets of confusing vocabulary! Do you RAISE your hand, or RISE it? Do you LAY down, or LIE down? "Who is LAYING in my bed?" Or is that "Who is LYING in my bed?" This lesson will teach you the meaning of each of these words, and how each of them is used differently. Many native English speakers make mistakes with 'lay' and 'lie', but by the end of this lesson you will understand the grammatical reason why we use each of them in different situations. This is a part of the language that can be challenging for English learners because it has irregular verbs. But don't be scared! Mr. E and I will explain it and make it clear. So have a seat and let's learn some English! Afterwards, test your vocabulary knowledge with the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/confusing-english-lie-lay-raise-rise-arise/ TRANSCRIPT Good morning. Hmm. Sorry. James from engVid. That probably raises a few questions for you. "Why did he say: 'Good morning', when it could be any time in the world?" Yeah. Well, I'm going to help you today, because that is a common word that we use in English, but there are some other words that are similar that many people make a mistake with. And I'm going to help you learn them today. That's "raise", "rise", "arise", "lay", and "lie". Now, quick story: When I first heard this 10 years ago, I was teaching and a teacher asked me: "James, why do we raise or why do we rise?" And I didn't know. I honestly didn't know. Of course I know what... When to use them, but my problem was we just know because we've been taught, but no one actually sits you down and said: "The exact difference is this." So I had to study it. And today I'm going to help you not make the mistake I made, by knowing what it is and how to use it, or use them, because we have five words. Let's go to the board. Do I raise my hand or rise my hand? Tough question if you don't know the differences between them. And I'm hoping this lesson will help you. In fact, by the time we're done, you should master this and be more fluent in your English use. First one: "arise". If you ever watched any sci-... Scientific movie, sci-fi movie, there is some dead creature and some crazy magician or scientist goes: "Arise!" Well, we don't quite use it like that in English; we use it a little differently. When we talk about "arise", we mean something has occurred or something has happened. "A few things arose when you were away on vacation." That means things happened or occurred. Another way of saying it is: "come up". If you look at Mr. E at the bottom of the stairs, Mr. E 2 says: "Hey, come here." And he goes up the stairs, so something has come up. Hey, listen, there's a couple of things that I said arose or have arisen, things have come up or occurred that have happened and I want to talk about them. Okay? Cool. That's "arise". Now, one other thing about "arise"... Let's just talk about it for a second. "Arise" is an irregular verb. Irregular verb? Well, most verbs follow a simple pattern; you add "ed" or add "d" to the end is past tense, there's a base form, and then there's the past participle form. And, you know, looks like "ed", "ed", and regular form. Easy. Irregular verbs means they don't follow that rule, so you have to change it. And unfortunately, there's no way for me to teach you and say: "With every irregular verb, you must do this." They're irregular because different ones look different ways. Sorry. But I'm going to help you by putting it here, and you can also go and study the charts for irregular verbs. Okay? I believe we have some on our engVid tools you can use or resources. So, "arise", as I said, "come up", is an irregular verb; it doesn't follow the regular rules. So you're going to have to pay attention when I show you how it's spelt. The second thing I have here is intransitive. I spelt it over here for you, but intransitive. "Intransitive", well, "trans" in English... Or, sorry. Latin means across. It means it goes from one place to another. An intransitive verb means it doesn't take a direct object. Huh? Well, here's the example of transitive verb: "I love". If you're sitting there, you're probably thinking to yourself: "You love what? Ice cream? Football? Your mother? Your shoes?" Well, with a transitive verb, it takes an object or a direct object, meaning it has an effect on something else. "I love you." Yeah, I do, engVid watcher, I love you. You are my object, my love goes to you. That's what a transitive verb means, so the verb has to carry across to an object. While, an interested verb... Intransitive verb doesn't need that. All right? Well, I'll give you an example in a second because we have a few on the board. But in this case, "arise" is an intransitive verb. All right? You don't need to have an object with it. Okay? Here, I'm going to give you the forms. "Arise" is present tense, "arose" is past tense, and when you use the past perfect or present perfect, use "arisen".
English Grammar - How to ask questions
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Do you have trouble being understood when you ask for information or help in English? Take this lesson and get what you need the first time you ask for it! http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-how-to-ask/
Fix Your English Grammar Mistakes: Talking about People
 
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Should you say "most of people" or "most people"? "Brazilian people" or "Brazilians"? "Every people" or "everybody"? If you're not 100% sure, this lesson is for you. In this lesson you'll learn how to talk about people correctly in English. This is an important subject because, in conversation, we often talk about things people do. I'll teach you the grammar behind common sentences and statements. You'll learn to use these sentence structures correctly and to avoid mistakes that many English learners make. Then take the quiz here: http://www.engvid.com/fix-your-english-grammar-mistakes-talking-about-people/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you about some mistakes a lot of students make. So, I've been teaching English for about five years now, and the mistakes I'm going to teach you today, I've seen students make many times in both their speaking, as well as their writing. Okay? So these mistakes are mistakes students make when they're talking about people. So, I'm going to give you some examples of some of these mistakes. The first one I want to show you: "Some Canadian people hate winter." It's true, I'm one of those people; I hate winter. So, "Some Canadian people hate winter." There's a mistake, here. I want you to take a moment to look, and think: What could the mistake be? "Some Canadian people hate winter." I'll give you a hint: The mistake is somewhere here. If you thought "people" is the mistake, you're correct. "Canadian people", it's redundant. We don't need the word "people", because "Canadian"... If we add an "s" here, this means "Canadian people". Okay? So, instead of saying "Canadian people", we would say "Canadians". "Some Canadians hate winter." It's the same if we wanted to talk about Americans. We would not say: "Some American people hate winter." We would prefer to say: "Some Americans"-with an "s"-"hate winter". So, let's look at another example. "Many Brazilian people are learning English." So, there's a mistake, here. What's the mistake? "Many Brazilian people are learning English." If you said the mistake was "people", you're correct. When we're talking about nationalities, we do not use the word "people". So, what can we do to fix this? We can get rid of the word "people", and what can we do to the word "Brazilian", because there's more than one? We can add an "s". So, now it's: "Many Brazilians are learning English." Okay? So, I'm going to give you another example, this time not on the board, but I'm just going to say it. "Many Asian people like spicy food.", "Many Asian people like spicy food." Now, how would you fix this sentence? If you said: "Many Asians like spicy food." you'd be correct. So, when we talk about nationalities, we do not need this word; this word is a waste of space. We just need the nationality with an "s". So, I have another common mistake students make over here: "Muslim people". So, Muslim is a religion. Okay? "Muslim people fast"-"fast" means they don't eat-"during Ramadan". "Muslim people fast during Ramadan." It means Muslim people do not eat during their holy month, their religious month of Ramadan. So, there's a mistake, here. What do you think the mistake is? If you said, just like this, "people" is the mistake - you're correct. When we talk about religion and we're talking about Muslims, Christians, Jews, Hindus - you don't need the word "people". We could just change this to: "Muslims". So, "Muslim" here means a whole... All Muslims, it's like Muslim people, but we don't need the word "people". Here's another example: "Christian people celebrate Easter.", "Christian people celebrate Easter." How can we fix this sentence? We can get rid of the word "people", and just add an "s". We can do the same thing for Hindus. "Hindus are often vegetarian", we could say. "Many Jews live in Israel.", "Many Buddhists live in Asia." Okay? So, instead of saying: "Jewish people", "Hindu people", it's easier just to say "Hindu" with an "s" or "Jews" with an "s". All right, so let's look at some other common mistakes students make. Okay, so another mistake I often see students make in their writing especially, and also sometimes in their speaking is with "most", "some", and "a lot" when they're using these words with "people". Okay? So, the first example: "Most of people have cell phones these days." I see students use: "Most of people" a lot in their essays. So, what's the mistake, here? I'll give you a minute to think about it. "Most of people". The problem here is "of". Okay? We don't need "of"; "of" is incorrect here. We would just say: "Most people". "Most people have cell phones these days." Okay? "Most people love Chinese food.", "Most people like to play sports." You don't need "of". If you had: "Most of the people", that would be okay, but you need "the" here, although that's not as common.
5 common mistakes in spoken English
 
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http://www.engvid.com Other or another? Make or do? Fun or funny? In this lesson, I'm going to teach you how to avoid FIVE very common mistakes in spoken English. I'll go over five confusing pairs of words, and tell you when each word should be used. Take ten minutes to watch this class and improve your spoken English immediately. Then take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/5-common-spoken-english-mistakes/ !
Advanced English Phrases 2 - Pronunciation - English Fluency Bits - Master English Conversation 2.0
 
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http://www.englishanyone.com/speak-fluent-english-confidently-in-6-months-ea7/ Start expressing yourself clearly and confidently in English today with our complete 6 month fluency training video course! :) The Master Class video lesson in the Master English Conversation 2.0 program helps you: See actual native speakers speaking at native speed Learn To Think, Act And Speak natively See how all of the English words, phrases, expressions and culture come together in fluent, blended English Discover my best techniques for developing leadership skills, building speaking confidence, thinking in English, speaking under pressure and much more Get simple, clear explanations of complex -- and often confusing -- English language topics and grammar Steal the fluency shortcuts of native speakers that will have you learning expressions 2 -- 3 times faster See clear examples of how to move and behave so you're prepared for meeting native speakers in real life Master words and expressions visually so they become unforgettable *** FULL TRANSCRIPTS AND AUDIO VERSIONS ARE INCLUDED WITH ALL LESSONS! :) *** Keep reading to learn more about how you can become a great speaker... Even after years of studying, are you disappointed with your English level? Can you read and write English well, but still not speak confidently? Do you have trouble thinking of the right words to use in conversations? Are you nervous, self-conscious and afraid around native speakers? Is it hard for you to understand the idioms, slang and expressions they use? Do you worry that you'll make mistakes, or that you won't be able to respond to native speakers in conversations? Imagine what your life would be like if you could: Communicate powerfully and confidently in English, on the phone and in person, without hesitation... Feel EXCITED when talking with native speakers, instead of shy, embarrassed and fearful... Express the REAL YOU, and demonstrate your value and skills in English, without translating... Speak fluent English confidently without getting stuck thinking and translating in conversations... Sound like a native English speaker with clear and smooth pronunciation... Understand different English accents, and use slang, idioms and real English expressions... Speak grammatically correct English without having to think of confusing grammar rules... Meet native English speakers to practice speaking with no matter where you live in the world... And achieve the level of English fluency you've been working so hard for (finally!!!) To understand why you're struggling to learn click on the link below and start seeing the success in your English speaking you deserve! http://www.englishanyone.com/speak-fluent-english-confidently-in-6-months-ea7/ Cải thiện nói tiếng Anh Mỹ / 미국 영어 발음 향상 / 話されているアメリカ英語を向上させる / Улучши разговорный американский английский / Meningkatkan berbicara bahasa Inggris Amerika / Melhore sua pronúncia do inglês americano / Mejora tu pronunciación en Inglés Americano / 美語 / बात अमेरिकी अंग्रेजी में सुधार / تحسين لهجتك الأمريكية الإنجليزية / שפר את המבטא האמריקאי שלך
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"DOWN" Phrasal Verbs in English: close down, bring down, break down...
 
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You've never learned phrasal verbs like this before! In this video, you'll learn the ideas behind phrasal verbs with the word "down" in them. You'll learn "close down", "bring down", "shout down", and many more. Most importantly, I always want you to learn the hidden meanings of words so that you can understand them when you hear them out of context, in a way you haven't seen them before. I'll go over examples for how these phrasal verbs are used in conversation and we'll practice using them together on the whiteboard. Then test your understanding with the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/down-phrasal-verbs-in-english/
How to have a conversation about RELIGION in English
 
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Religion and beliefs are an important part of our lives, but talking about them can be difficult. If you're not careful, you might offend someone or even get into trouble. In this video, I'll teach you how to discuss religion politely so you can have respectful conversations in English and learn about other cultures. You'll learn vocabulary related to major religions and beliefs so you can discuss popular faiths intelligently. Most importantly, I'll teach you how to use open-ended questions that will help you develop conversations with people who have different beliefs. I'll talk about Judaism, Christianity, Buddhism, Islam, and others while discussing how people can identify as being religious, spiritual, orthodox, or non-practicing. I'll also explain the difference between of atheists and agnostics. The world is full of many cultures and beliefs. We all have so much to learn from each other, so take your English conversations to the next level by learning to discuss religion. Test your understanding of the lesson by taking the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-have-a-conversation-about-religion-in-english/ TRANSCRIPT You are healed. You are...Hi, James from engVid. When I'm not actually teaching English, sometimes I do religious services. I'm joking, but this is a serious matter. By the end of this video, I would like to make sure that when you speak to people of different religious faiths or backgrounds, you will be able to, when you will remember that...Well, how to talk about religion, or faith, or belief. Okay? Sometimes we talk about religion, and sometimes we can say "faith" or "belief" and it means to believe in a higher power; it could be God, it could be a Spirit, whatever moves you. I think it's kind of a serious lesson, because religion is a very powerful force in our lives, and we should be respectful of one another or to each other when we discuss it. You can't have an open dialogue if you have a closed mind. "Dialogue" means to talk, okay? So, this lesson is to help you be able to speak to someone else who doesn't believe the same way you do, so at least you understand each other. Listen to me carefully: You don't have to always agree or like, but you can respect and understand, and that's today's lesson. So, ready to get serious? Let's go to the board, shall we? Okay. So, you'll notice I have different symbols up here. I am a terrible drawer. I can't do anything. The worm is as good... Sorry, E. Mr. E is as good as I get, so this is as good as you're going to get. So if you go: "My faith is not there. I'm Bahai." I'm like: "You're behind me, because I don't know how to draw it. Sorry." So, here are some of the world's major religions that have billions of people that follow, or hundreds of millions. So I tried my best. Forgiveness if I didn't get it quite right. Okay? Nobody get upset. I did a bad drawing for all of you. Let's go to the board. One of the most common questions people say when they talk about religion, they meet you and go: "Hi. My name is James. I'm from Canada. I teach English. Do you believe in God?" And that's the problem right there. "Do you believe in God?" You're going: "What's the problem? It's a question." Yeah, but it's a yes/no question. Please check out the other videos I have on making interesting conversation, because especially in this one, when you say yes or no, you really limit the person, or we say put them in a corner. You put me in a place where I'm with you or against you. Already we have division or friction. So why don't we ask a question that lets them speak to us, and explain to them where we're coming from so that we can get a mutual understanding? Now we understand together. And I think I've got two questions that can help you make friends from different faiths, so you understand each other and start that dialogue. Remember? Talking. If you say: "Are you a person of faith?" you're not... They can say yes or no, but you're actually not saying "God". Remember I said "faith" or "belief"? "Belief" means to think something is real. "Faith" means to believe something... Believe in something. And when you're thinking of that, I don't necessarily have to think of God. I could think of a force that makes the world go around. Gaia. Some people believe in Gaia. Life... The Earth is alive and we're part of the Earth. That's a belief, it's a faith. Some people believe... Have... Well, you don't have a belief in science. You could say it's a belief, but they believe in science. Right? And that has nothing to do with God. So when people say: "Do you believe in God?" They're really saying: "There are those who believe in God, and the blasphemers and the heathens", and it doesn't have to be like that. Some people don't believe in the book, but they actually believe in the same God you do. So, give them a break. Okay? And ask: "Hey, are you a person of faith?" And they might say: "Yes, I do believe in a higher power." Okay?
Vocabulary for EATING and DRINKING
 
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Eating and drinking are things we do every single day, but the vocabulary available to talk about them is much richer than the obvious words we use on a regular basis. In this English vocabulary lesson, you will learn different ways to express eating and drinking in creative ways. How would you tell someone you wanted more than a snack but less than a meal? Do you know the difference between "wolfing down", "devouring", and "scarfing down" food? Watch the video to find out, and make sure to do the quiz afterwards to practice what you learned! http://www.engvid.com/vocabulary-for-eating-and-drinking/ TRANSCRIPT Mm, mm, eating. New Orleans is a gourmand's dream. Oh, and I'm so hungr-... Hi. James from engVid. I'm hungry, and I'm thinking about eating, and I'm sure you do, too. After all, eating is a natural thing. But in your experience of what you've been taught, I'm sure you've been told words like: "delicious", "eating", and that's about it. Hey, the world's a big place and a rich place, so why don't we give you a rich vocabulary and give you, you know, some native-speaker speak on eating. Are you ready? Let's go to the board. So, I'm looking at a book. I'll say... Oh, what's this? "Time to pig out, Mr. E? It's not time to scarf down pizza and beer. We've got work to do." I'm sure you're going: "Scarf? Why 'scarf'?" We'll find out. On the board, we have: "How to talk about eating". Simple enough. Chew, swallow. No, not so simple. Like, in every country, there's a way to speak about things, and I want to give you a good... Good introduction to our eating lexicon, which is dictionary. We're going to go from a little to a lot. And I'll give you the words that we might use, and explain each one, and you'll notice there are some pictures here, so I will give you the number with each picture. Some won't have pictures, but hey, that's life. Suck it up, baby. So the first one: "nibble". I want you to imagine a mouse. [Nibbles] Do mice eat a lot? No. They eat a little bit, just a little food. Okay? Now, "nibble" can be a noun as in the amount of food you eat, or verb, and it means to eat just a little bit. Okay? And that's our first one. "Nibble". Think of a mouse. A mouse nibbles its food; has a little bit of food. "Graze" is number two. "Grazing" is funny. You kind of eat a lot, but you don't. Huh? Well, when you graze, think of cows. You see the cow: "Moo", it's moving through, [eating noises]; moves over here, [eating noises] moves over here. It eats a little bit of everything, or as I like to say, when I go to people's houses and I don't know if the food is good, I just graze. I try a little, [eating noises], and I move on. Try a little, I move on. I might stay in a place where I like that. Okay? Cows graze. Funny enough, men don't really graze. Women graze more than men. They do it because they eat, they go: "I'm having fun, I'm enjoying myself. I'm going to try this, this, this, this, this." Men just want to, boom, gulp it down. So, to graze is to move and eat a little bit of food at a time. We usually do this at buffets or with foods we're not sure of, like, I'm just going to graze a bit. Okay? You see the cow? That's Bessie, graze. So, when you see people eating a little bit of food, and moving around, and keep coming back to the same food - they're grazing. Not really eating. Numero uno. Uno? Did I say "uno"? See, I don't speak Spanish. That's why I shouldn't. Number three: "bite". You know a bite as, here? Yeah. Easy. Right. Oh, sorry, I should say "graze" is a verb before I forget, there. "Graze", a verb. "Bite", a bite. Now, notice a bite is singular in this case. "A bite" is interesting because it's a medium amount of food, and it's a noun. When you go for a bite, you want some food. When we talk about "nibble", I said cheese, I should have actually said: "Think nibbling as on peanuts, chips maybe, a cookie or two". I just want to nibble; not a lot of food. Remember the noun? When you go for a bite to eat, you want something like a hot dog. You go: "Okay, I get it." No, no, you don't get it. I want just a hot dog, or I want a slice of pizza, or I want a hamburger, but I don't want a salad, I don't want dessert, I just want something more than a nibble, more than chips, but not a full meal. I'm not... I don't have the time or I'm not that hungry. So when you go for a bite, some people might go... They won't even go for a doughnut, like a doughnut would be something to nibble on or just eat, but a bite would be a hamburger, hot dog, something like that. Big, but not too big, because it's a medium amount of food. All right? So, I'm going to go for a bite. And look here, there's a mouth. There you go. "Bite". Don't forget to get a bite. Okay? I might even say as an idiom: "I'm going out for a bite. Do you want something?" If you go: "Yeah, give me a salad, plus this", I go: "Dude, I'm going for a bite. You want a meal, go by yourself. That's way too much food."
Talk like a native speaker - GONNA, HAVETA, WANNA
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Native English speakers talk very fast -- so fast that they change words! Improve your listening comprehension and learn the correct pronunciation of "gonna", "haveta", and "wanna". You'll also learn when to use these slang pronunciations. After you watch, take the quiz to test yourself at http://www.engvid.com/gonna-haveta-wanna/
Writing - Transitions - THEREFORE, THUS, CONSEQUENTLY
 
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http://www.engvid.com Learn how to use "therefore" and "thus" to show you have reached a conclusion. These transitions will improve your writing by helping you link ideas. In this lesson, we will look at transitions of conclusion and consequence to help ideas flow and improve our writing styles. I'll also teach you how you can use words like "so", "then", "hence", and "as a result" for the same purpose. Watch the lesson, then take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/writing-transitions-therefore-thus-consequently/ TRANSCRIPT: Hi, again. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is -- actually, I had a few requests for it. So I'm not going to mention names right now because there are too many to mention. But some people asked me about transitions, again, specifically, "therefore" and "thus". But I figured I would do the whole package because they can all work together. If you're writing essays, you can use more than one of these, more than two of these, especially for longer essays. So first, we're going to look at the differences or similarities -- as the case may be -- of these words and when and how they are used. Okay? So the words we're looking at today are "therefore", "thus", "consequently", "so", "then, "hence", and the expression "as a result". Okay? So again, all of these are transitions. I'll put it here. So a little review. What is a transition? A transition is like a bridge that connects two ideas. Okay? So what are we connecting here? What are the ideas that we want to connect? We want to connect a logical conclusion. Okay? Or we want to connect a consequence. What is a "consequence"? A consequence is, basically, a result. So for example, in life, we make choices, we make decisions, and then, we have to live with the consequences, whatever those choices bring us. Okay? So there's a very, very slight difference in these three words, especially. These are the three that I want you to use most on essays if you're going to be writing essays. Okay? We use "therefore" -- again, it's more of a mathematical word, but we use it, obviously, to write, as well. When we have a premise, from there premise, we generally reach a conclusion. Now, what is a "premise"? A "premise" is an idea that we believe to be true. And because we believe it is true, from that truth we reach a conclusion. Okay? I think everybody knows a very famous "premise + conclusion" sentence. "I think" -- premise -- "I believe that I think, therefore I am." That's the conclusion I reach. Because I think, I am. Okay. Don't be confused. It's not "because". Premise and conclusion, but I'm just trying to simplify it a little bit. "Thus" means "result". Now, it's a little bit different from "consequence". "Result" means a result of the last argument. Okay? And "consequence" is -- again, it's a result, but a consequence. Something's going to happen as a result of the thing before. Now, it's very, very important to remember, something had to be mentioned before you can use any of these words. Okay? All of these words and whatever sentence or clause or whatever comes after it is in relation to what came before. Okay? I said something before; this is my conclusion now. Or this is the result of what happened or this is the consequence. More informally, we can use "so" also to talk about a consequence or a result. We use "then". So, "This happened. Then, I did this." Not "then" like time, like sequence. "Then" means more like, "This happened, so I did this." "This happened. Then, I did that as a result of the first thing." Now, a lot of people ask me about this word, "hence". The first thing I will say is don't use it. One, it's a bit old-fashioned and a bit snobby. And two, most people don't use it correctly anyway. I personally don't like this word, but if you must use it, then, remember it's also like a consequence. Use it instead of "thus" -- probably instead of "therefore". And of course, very casual, "as a result". Okay? So before we look at this -- all of these individually, let's look at some examples. "I am cold." Okay? This is the situation. "I am cold. Therefore, I'll put on a coat." [Coughs] Excuse me. Actually, you know what? Let me change this. Sorry. I'll put a period here. If I were going to use "therefore" with this, I would start a new sentence. All of these words can be used to start a sentence or mid-sentence. But some of them are better used to start. Some of them are better used in the middle. "I'm cold. Therefore, I'll put on a coat."
How to use Mind Maps to understand and remember what you read!
 
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Do you have a hard time remembering what you read? Do you need to read things many times before you understand? Reading books can be discouraging because of the large amount of information on each page. To help you make sense of all that information, I will show you how to create a mind map. A mind map is a graphic that shows categories containing quick reference points from your book. By taking short notes and organizing them in a specific way, you will have all the information you need to quickly and easily remember the important points of a book. Just the process of thinking about and creating this mind map will help your brain to understand and remember the material. Try it! It really works and it is free. Mind maps are especially useful when it's time to write an assignment or study for an exam! Watch the video to learn how to create your own mind map. Watch my first mind map lesson: https://www.engvid.com/mind-maps-how-to-learn-vocabulary/ Take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-use-mind-maps-to-understand-and-remember-what-you-read/ TRANSCRIPT How to submit. We want to hear from all artists and makers who have a passion for creating. That's cool. Hi. James from engVid. You notice? I was reading. It's not a special skill. Most of us learn it, but the problem is when you go to another language it's difficult sometimes to understand what's on the paper and be able to use that. So today's lesson is about mind maps. Mind maps? Yeah. Wait a second, mind maps and reading. I did a general lesson earlier on. Somewhere in the link you can look down and you can find it, go back, you can watch it. But in that lesson I didn't give any specific examples on mind maps. I'm doing this particular lesson to address that. So, if you're here going: "Yeah, I want to learn about mind maps and reading", this is your lesson. Hold on two seconds. We're going to discuss what the benefits are, what the benefits of reading are, then I'm going to give you a very detailed mind map explaining what parts you should do for what, and that'll help you with reading. Are you ready? Let's go to the board. All right, E, what's up? "It's all Greek to me." Omega, it's not the best symbol, you probably can't see it, but Greek. In English we say when something's Greek to me, it means we don't understand it. A lot of times you'll get a big contract when, you know, you have your cellphone and there's a bill and it's: "Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah", and you're like: "I don't understand it. It's all Greek." I know you understand all of the words, it's just they're put together in such a way it's difficult, and that doesn't matter if you're reading your own language or another language. But there are a lot of benefits when you're learning another language that reading gives you. And a lot of people want to talk and listen, but reading has some power. And let's address that now. Okay? So mind maps are reading comprehension. Don't worry if you haven't seen the mind map, it's coming up in a second or two. But the first thing I want to talk to you about is reading helps you understand the way that the language is put together. Most of you will come and... You come to engVid to learn vocabulary and grammar, but that doesn't help you with syntax, that doesn't help you with putting the words together in a logical way. Reading does that because... Well, let's face facts, when you're reading someone is actually speaking to you but they're not in front of you. So the problem is if they're not very clear and they don't use the language well, you won't really understand them. Right? So reading teaches you how to... The language is put together, where the verbs go, and when's a better place to use the verb or a noun, and how you can show expressions. Okay? Reading also teaches you how to speak by showing you the way that the language is used by the native speakers. Huh? Well, if it's a fiction book they actually say: "-'Johnny, are you coming?' -'Yes.' Dah, dah, dah, dah", and they show you how we use the language. So not only do you understand how to put the language together by looking at it and going: "Ah, comma here, period here", but then they say: "Hey, this is how we speak." So if you follow this you can actually use that kind of method or sys-... Not system. You can follow those words and actually speak like we do. All right?
How to MASTER your vocabulary
 
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http://www.engvid.com I am going to show you how to master your vocabulary using four simple steps. This is an important class for anyone learning a language. Learn how to never forget words again. And remember to take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/how-to-master-your-vocabulary/ !
How to improve your English with MUSIC and MOVIES!
 
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You learn the most English if you're having fun doing it. So today, I'm going to teach you how to improve your English by watching movies and by listening to music! Many of you already listen to English music and watch shows and movies that are in English. I'm going to teach you some activities that will make you active with the language you hear. You'll also learn fun games you can play by yourself or with a friend that will help you learn vocabulary, expressions, and pronunciation. By learning English from movies and music, you'll also sound more like a native speaker. http://www.engvid.com/how-to-improve-your-english-with-music-and-movies/ TRANSCRIPT To be, or not to be - that is the... Hi. James from engVid. Just practicing my Shakespeare. Well, not really. I just wanted to show you acting. Acting, being an actor can be a good way to learn English. And today I want to show you two fun ways to practice English doing things you already love to do. Okay? So, let's go to the board. Mr. E is saying: "I sound like Madonna!" That's not here yet, but that'll be the second one, but today or right now this part of the lesson is about movies, acting. What we want you to do or what I want you to do is go find a movie you love in English. I'm sure there's... If you're watching me, I'm sure you've watched some English television program or movie. I mean, I'm speaking a lot of English so I know you're used to it. What I... What I want you to do is pretend you are an actor in a movie, and we're going to take a few steps to get there. So the first thing is: Pick a movie that you love watching, because some of you watch it again and again. Star Wars, yeah, yeah? Or Harry Potter, if that's still out there, or Bond, James Bond. Right? Any of those movies. Okay, so you pick your movie. The second thing I want you to do is go through the movie and watch the scenes you love the best when the actor says something like: "Punk, do you feel lucky, punk? Well, do ya?" And then pick a couple of those scenes. All right? The third thing I want you to do is go to this part, and it's i-m... It's www.imsdb.com. It's where you get scripts. Now, right now you're probably going: "What's a script?" Well, in music the words in the music are called lyrics. Okay? So when you're looking at the words in a song they're called the lyrics. But when you're looking at the words in a movie, it's from a script. And one actor has his part in a script, another actor has her part in a script. And these are the lines they say. This particular website has amazing amount... An amazing amount of movies with scripts, so you can go and find any of the latest ones, like of Jason Bourne, or I'm trying to think of something that came out. I don't know when you're going to see this, so just say Harry Potter, maybe Ironman. Okay? Go check it out, you'll see the scripts, you can go and look at it. The reason why I asked you up here is to pick out scenes is you can go to the scene on the script where it may say: "Car chase scene", "Gun scene", "Kissing scene", and you can look at it, and all of the words the actors say are there. Because I know sometimes you don't know what the actor is actually saying. Sometimes we have what's called relaxed speech. In relaxed speech, they might say: "What do you want?" and it comes out: "Whatda ya want?" And you're like: "What?" It's English. Now, we have a video on relaxed speech, you can go and check it out, and it will explain: "Whatda ya want?" and other ones. Okay? So, the lines that will be there, you might notice a big difference between what the actor says and what is actually written for what you should explain or you should understand. Okay? This is good, it's going to help you with your ears as well. There's a thing you can pick up from listening. Okay? So we want to look at the scripts and then listen. Now, watch the movie at your favourite part. So now you've got the script in your hand, you're going to watch that part. Read. Here's the funny thing, a lot of times people read when they're watching a movie, like they read the subtitles-you know the little words?-and they think: "My listening is good because I understand." No, you're reading, but it does help because it helps you put a picture, a word picture to the words you're hearing. And we're much better with pictures. Think of it this way: Have you ever walked up to someone and said: "I remember your name, but I don't remember your face." No, you don't do that. We always remember faces and we forget names. Those kind of words and sounds are hard to remember, but the picture we always keep.
Phrasal Verbs for TRAVEL: "drop off", "get in", "check out"...
 
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Want to learn some extremely common verbs for traveling? You've come to the right place. They say traveling is the school of life. It is also a great opportunity to improve your English! In this video, I will teach you common phrasal verbs that we use when talking about traveling. But first, I will explain what phrasal verbs are and show you their importance in conversational English. We will look at how to correctly use "drop off", "see off", "take off", "get in", "check in", and more. Join me, and get ready for a big trip to improve both your life and your English! TAKE THE QUIZ: http://www.engvid.com/phrasal-verbs-for-travel-drop-off-get-in-check-out/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I'm going to talk about something I love, and that is travel. So, if you like travelling too, if you're planning on going on a vacation, or if you know somebody who's travelling, this video will be very, very helpful to you. In this video I'm going to teach you some very important verbs. They're all phrasal verbs, and I'll explain what a phrasal verb is in a moment. So, these are all verbs that we use when we're talking about travel. Okay. So, to get started, I wanted to tell you a little bit about phrasal verbs. What is a phrasal verb? One of the difficulties students have with English are verbs where you have a verb and a preposition. So, when you see a verb and a preposition together, that's a phrasal verb. Now, you might be thinking: "What's a preposition?" Good question. I'm going to give you an example. We have here four words, each of these is a phrasal verb. They all have the verb "get": "get in", "get up", "get on", "get over", and there's many more, "get away". There's tons of them. Each of these actually can have multiple meanings, too. So, one of the most difficult parts about English is learning phrasal verbs, because this, the blue part is the preposition, it can change the meaning of the verb. Okay? So, prepositions are words like: "on", "off", "up", "down", "toward", "over", "away", these types of words are prepositions. So, you'll notice with phrasal verbs, they're very, very common in conversation. They're... You can write them down, too, but in general, when people talk they often use phrasal verbs. Okay? So, they're very, very important, especially when you're talking about going on a trip with your friends or family. So let's look at some of the common phrasal verbs we use when we're talking about trips. The first verb I want to teach you: "Drop off". Okay? So: "drop" is the verb, "off" is the preposition, together: "drop off" is a phrasal verb. What does this mean: "drop off"? When you "drop someone off" it means you're taking them to a place and then you leave them there. So, for example, maybe your friend needs to go to the airport, so you drive them to the airport and you drop them off at the airport. This means you take them there and you leave them in that place. Okay? So they don't come home with you; they stay there. So, for example, I have a friend named Frank, and when Frank goes travelling: "We drop Frank off at the airport." So, we drive Frank to the airport, he has all his luggage, his suitcases, and then we say to Frank: "Goodbye, Frank, you know, have a nice trip." We drop Frank off at the airport. You can also use "drop off" in a lot of other situations. For example, when you were a child maybe your parents, your mom or your dad, or maybe your grandparents dropped you off at school. This means that they took you to school, and then once you got to school, they would say goodbye to you and they would leave. So: "drop off" means you take someone to a place, and then you leave them there. You'll also notice... So, I have here the verb and the preposition. "Frank" is a name of a person and it's in the middle of "drop" and "off". Okay? So, these two are not together. We drop somebody off at the airport. Okay? So, sometimes with phrasal verbs... For some phrasal verbs you actually separate them, and you can put the names of somebody between them; for other ones you can't do that. For this one: "drop off", you put the name between the two... Between the verb and the preposition. So, now let's look at another example of a common phrasal verb. "See off". Okay? So, again, we have "off" in both of these. "See off" is when... It's similar to "drop off", but it's a little bit different. Sometimes your family or your friends are going away for a long time, maybe they're going on a vacation or a trip, so you want to "see them off". It means you want to say goodbye to them at the airport, at the train station, maybe at their house. So, it's that goodbye you say before somebody goes off on a vacation. Okay? So, for example: "We see Frank off." Frank is going to Australia, so we go to the airport because we want to say goodbye to Frank, so: "We see Frank off" is another way to say: "We say goodbye to Frank when he goes on his trip."
How to start a conversation: 5 things to say after "hello"
 
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Don't know what to say? Don't worry! In this video, you'll learn easy ways to start a good, useful conversation. You'll learn how to choose topics for conversation, and I'll teach you the questions you should ask to start enjoyable and meaningful conversations! You're going to have fun, improve your English, and make friends! What could be better? Test your understanding of the lesson with the quiz! http://www.engvid.com/how-to-start-a-conversation-5-things-to-say-after-hello/ TRANSCRIPT God, I love your lips, Angelina. Hi. James from engVid. I was just thinking to myself: Well, I know it's very difficult to practice English because you don't get a lot of practice with English speakers, but if there were a way I could teach you how to get past "Hello" to make the conversation grow and perhaps have the other person come back and talk to you, that would be of great value. So this lesson is about how to get past "Hello" and make a beautiful conversation flow. All right? I'm going to use Angelina to help me later on when I do an example, but for now I will tell you more. See? He's like: "Tell me more. Hmm. I'm interested." And so am I. All right, so let's go to the board, shall we? I'm going to give you five conversation openers. You've said: "Hello", where do you go? Personally I hate this because I teach and I hear people say: "Hello. My name is James. I am from Japan, Tokyo." The conversation is essentially dead. Dunh-dunh-dunh-dunh. Don't know if that's the wedding theme or the theme from Star Wars. Doesn't matter. You understand. It's killed. Nobody cares. You've said everything that they need to know and then they're done. So why don't we do something that actually gets them to open up and want to tell you information? Okay? So the first one we're going to do is this one. I like this one. It's so easy, it's so true. Look for something that someone is wearing or has that you actually like. You're not going to steal it, so don't think about that. But what I mean is you like. You like the t-shirt, you like the jeans, the ear rings or something, you're like: "Cool", because that will be sincere. "Sincere" means that you really mean it and the person can feel that from you, so they'll want to share with you because you're being honest with them. All right? So we look here, number one, walk up and say... So it's like: "Hello. Love your __________ (jacket, t-shirt). That is so cool." Yeah? "Where did you get them?" or "Where did you get it?" Notice I didn't say: "Where did you buy it?" because some of the coolest things someone's going to be wearing won't be from this country. It might be: "Hey. I was in India and I picked up these beads. Yeah, it was really cool. I was outside this ashram and..." And now you've got a conversation you didn't even know. Or it might be: "Oh, I was downtown in the hippie section, you know, and it was really cool, there was all this art." You've started a conversation. If you say: -"...buy them?" -"At the gap." Finished. So: "Hey. Where did you get them?" Let them say "buy". Don't bring that up. Okay? Follow that up with right away... As soon as you say: "Where did you buy them...?" It's true... It might not be true right now, but it could be true, you say: "Because I really have to get a cool present", or: "...an interesting gift for my nephew/my brother/my sister/my friend." Right? Or girlfriend, whatever, or your wife. By saying that you're saying, well, one thing, you have other friends. But number two, you're giving them: "Cool". You're saying whatever they're wearing is interesting, cool, different enough that it stopped you to talk to them. By example or by extension, that means added on you're saying: "You're kind of cool, too, because you're wearing it and I think it's cool, so it's got to be cool and only a cool person would buy it." Right? This is why it works, you've given them two compliments. Who doesn't want to be complimented? First you're saying I'm wearing something cool, then you're saying: "I need to get something cool, and clearly what you have is cool." I'm probably going to talk to you and go: "Well, you know, thanks for saying that. I liked it because..." And conversation started, and now you have an opportunity to maybe later on talk more, and that's how you get your practice. Number two, how about this one? "Wow, you are __________ (tall)" or: "You have __________ (really bright eyes)", or something that has to do with the physical body. The first one was about things. Physical. Now we want to talk about physical. And you followed that up with: "What do you do?" Huh? Example, you see someone, you go: "Wow, you have amazing skin. What do you do to make it so clear?" Okay? Hmm. Or: "Wow, you're tall. What do you do? Do you play sports or anything like that?" Okay? You follow it up. This is the follow up, as I said: "What do you do?" But why does this work? Now, notice this is green and I have green up here.
Sound like a native speaker: Delete the 'H'!
 
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Have you noticed that when native speakers talk quickly, they often shorten their words or even completely delete some sounds? This makes it challenging for English learners to understand fast speech, because the words are not pronounced in full. In this lesson, I will teach you about the silent H and how to recognize it to understand fast speech. I will also show you how to cut out the H at the beginning of certain words in order to sound more like a native English speaker. Improve your pronunciation by using the silent H, and see how much of a difference it can make! https://www.engvid.com/sound-like-a-native-speaker-silent-h/ TRANSCRIPT I've 'ad a long time to work on this lesson, and I bet what I just said went right by you. Hi. James from engVid. Today I want to talk about letter deletion. In English we do this a lot, and I don't want you... So I want you to understand: I don't want you to use it, but I'm going to teach you how to hear it, how to understand it, where it is commonly used so you can quickly identify when we're speaking quickly. Like when I said to you: "I ave", I said: "I have", but I dropped the "h" and that's today's lesson. We'll do other ones where I'll drop a "t", but for right now I want you to concentrate on the dropping of the "h", and we call it the "H deletion" or "H deletion" if you're American. All right? Let's go to the board. You'll notice over here, my man, Mr. E, he has: "A, B, C, D, E, F, G, ?, I", the deletion of H. Quick note. Okay? When we want to be clear on what we are saying we say each word exactly and precisely. Okay? However, when we say something regularly-okay? This is the examples of why we delete it-or we speak quickly or fast, we drop sounds. One letter we do this with is the letter "h". Okay? So as you can see, that's going to be my quick explanation on that, but I'm doing this sort of like a warning for you, this little part because you are not allowed to do this because you have an accent and you haven't mastered the English sounds. First you have to master the sounds, so it's better to say: "I have" instead of "ave", "I have", right? Master the sound. The second thing is this lesson's more about helping you to comprehend or listen to English, and understand English quickly. Okay? Are you ready? Time for me to do that magic board thing. [Snaps] So let's talk about where the letter "h" is commonly deleted. We know it's deleted, but I'm going to give you about five examples or six where you can see the letter "h" is deleted often or quite commonly. Okay? Remember I said we do it when we speak quickly or it's something we say regularly? So it won't be a surprise when I show you the examples on the board, why this would happen. The letter "h" is commonly dropped when we use the verb "to have" or when we use pronouns. So, "have" in this case becomes "ave". "Has" becomes "azz", and I'm putting the "z" sound because pronunciation, it's not "a-s". I know you "ass" for some of you, I know people who speak Spanish or have a Latin background will "ass", because they see the "s", but we say the "z" sound: "azz". And "had" becomes "ad". "E 'ad about five minutes before e 'ad to leave." If you're really careful... Well, you have to go over here to hear what I actually said, but I used two of them at the same time and it commonly happens, so much so that we as English speakers don't realize we're not actually speaking the language, but just sounds. All right? Let's go over to the pronoun side of the board. Okay? Well, the pronouns you'll see we have "he" becomes "e". Right? "E's a really good guy", and I'm not talking about Mr. E. "E's a really good guy", instead of: "He is a really good guy." Okay? "Her", I don't know err very well. I don't know err very well. It's not "her". "I don't know her very well.", "I don't know err very well." And "iz". Right? I know it's "iss", it looks like this, "his", but this makes this sound, the "iz" sound. Right? "Iz brother iz a good friend of mine. Iz brother is a good friend of mine." Notice how I'm speaking quickly, and for some of you I always speak quickly. But generally speaking: "I don't know iz schedule. I don't know iz schedule." It's not: "I don't know his schedule." Now, once again, I need to repeat this: You do not use this when you're speaking. I'm giving you this, I'm giving you these examples by saying them so as you hear me say them you're like: "That sounds familiar", and that's why sometimes you think you know what we're saying, but you're not too sure. It's because we delete these sounds. Now, if you saw what I did here I actually at the beginning played with you by I said: "E ad about five minutes." And I said: "E ad", so instead of: "He had five minutes to talk", "E ad five minutes to talk to us, then E had to go. I don't know if err brother's coming, err brother's coming."
Steps to Learning English: Where should you start?
 
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So you want to learn or improve your English. But where should you start? When you learn a new language, there is so much material to cover: vocabulary, grammar, syntax, slang, pronunciation... With so many topics to study, you may not know where to focus your attention. In this video, I will give you some tips to organize your schedule and decide what you should work on. Whether you are a beginner, intermediate, or advanced speaker, you can always find something to improve on, and I will give you the tools you need to devise a good plan. Hint: it's more simple than you think! http://www.engvid.com/steps-to-learning-english-where-to-begin/ TRANSCRIPT [Singing] Hi. James. Greer. James Greer. From engVid. [Laughs]. Not Bond, and I know you think I was going to say Bond. I know. But listen, Bond always has an important mission he's got to do, right? 007. And so do I. Today we have a mission. We're going to learn how to study English. I know in many places, many websites, they tell you, and to teach you grammar and idioms and phrasal verbs. But then, there's the big question of you, and: How do you study, and how do you choose what is important for you at this moment? Maybe you're advanced. Maybe you're a beginner. Maybe you know this, and maybe you don't. After today's lesson and we do our mission, you'll know exactly what you have to do. Okay? So, we're going to go to the board in a second, and take a look. What steps should we take in order to learn? By the time you're done this video, you'll know exactly... Or you should know where you are, where you need to go, and when you're going to be done. Ready? Let's go. E. E is standing here saying: "Where do I start? Grammar, vocabulary, or speaking?" Common, and seems to make sense, I mean, you go to learn a language-right?-you go on a website, they start throwing things at you. You go to a school, they say you need this, this, and this. But you don't really know. So, I'm going to give you the tools to decide that. First thing we're going to do is: What's the first thing you need? Grammar? No. What? Conversation? No. Vocabulary. What? Well, look. If you can't say: "bathroom" when you go to a country, you're going to pee yourself. Okay? "Hungry", you won't get food. You don't need to know everything to get basic information done. And that's what we should look at first. Basic information for a beginner really is vocabulary. And instead of all the fancy stuff you need, you don't need much. You need you, and a little bit of time, and to have some fun. Why? I'm going to suggest: For basic communication, get vocabulary. I'm telling you right now if I see you or any English-speaking person sees you, and you see... You say: "Drink. Thirsty." There's no grammar, but they'll go: "Oh, the bar is over there." If you say: "Washroom. Please", they'll go: "Oh, toilet is over there." They use sentence, you use words. Sometimes you just touch your belly and go: "Ahh!" They'll go: "Oh, you want food." You don't need all that stuff. People will tell you you need to learn grammar, and this and that. You don't. And here's how you get your first vocabulary. Do what you love to do. Play video games. I've had... I don't know how many students play video games, say they learned how to fire, duck, words that we wouldn't teach them for a while, because they were playing games. Other people come in: "Dah-dah-dah-dah-dah, [sings]", singing. I go: -"What the hell?" -"I love to sing", and they sing a song, they sound like they're just, you know, from this country. Then they speak very terrible accent. You know what I'm saying, right? [Laughs] But when they sing, it's like the gods have come down. I mean, literally, you go: "Are you...? You were born here, right?" Cool slang. You know? YOLO, you only live once. Right? ASAP, as soon as possible. When you do these things, you're learning because you want to learn. You're not even realising you're learning, and it's going to make you want to learn more because... You know, we'll get to the second one and you'll understand. But you want to communicate in a much better way. Okay? So, get the meaning of basic words. "Hungry", "food", "toilet", "money". You know that one, right? You need those things. If you have those things, you can start your adventure in learning English. Okay? And you're going to do it by doing things you love. Video games, music, cool slang. Right? Come on. Now we're making language fun and easy for you, and that's what we should do, because you'll learn it faster. All right? And then here's the bad news: Hard work is on its way, so let's move over to the intermediate.
Prepositions of place - in, on, at | English grammar
 
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An English grammar lesson to explain when we use the prepositions of place (in, on and at) 0:28 Using the preposition "at" to describe a specific point or place 2:07 The "at" preposition to define an exact address. 3:39 Using the "at" preposition of place for events and buildings 5:45 We can also use "at" when talking about somebody's house or a temporary stop during a journey. 7:33 Standard expressions that use "at" - For example at home, at school, at church etc. 9:00 We use the place preposition "on" for surfaces. Example we can say "Something is on the ceiling", on the table, on the floor etc. 10:30 Another use of "on" is when something is "attached" to something else, for example a ring is on a finger etc. 11:40 The "on" preposition can also be used for a town close to a river or the coast. We also use "on" for talking about places along a road. 13:32 Here is a list of expressions using the "on" preposition - Some examples are "on the farm", "on the left" etc 15:12 "in" is often used for enclosed places or places with a boundary. So we would say "in a forest" or "in a garden". 16:50 The most common use of the "in" preposition is for towns and cities. 17:58 There are some expressions with the "in" preposition like "in the newspaper", "in the sky" and many others. If you liked this video lesson and would like more, please subscribe to my channel, click on the "like" icon and leave a comment below :) Other videos: Grammar lessons: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpS4_AM1c0s0ozpROeE2A9ff Countable and uncountable nouns: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpSifmU3OsnQuex9lhBxuuOU Listening exercises: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpRdmnAzmYwdc0Az0ZOG2XNA Vocabulary videos: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6BDo90oiwpTlYAYSitjwWn29BEdCBi9j Andrew, Crown Academy of English Private English lessons & speaking practice: http://goo.gl/NCjX6O http://www.crownacademyenglish.com http://twitter.com/Crown_English http://www.youtube.com/user/CrownAcademyEnglish Photo credits ------------- "Confused Young Woman. Mixed Expression" Image courtesy of stockimages | FreeDigitalPhotos.net "Handsome Male Professional Pointing Away" Image courtesy of stockimages | FreeDigitalPhotos.net
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TO, ON, ABOUT: Prepositions of behavior in English
 
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I know prepositions can be confusing and difficult for people learning English. Even people who have been learning English for many years and who have huge vocabularies and great grammar, still find it difficult to know when to use each preposition. One of the best ways to learn prepositions is to learn them in context. That means you learn the meaning of the preposition when it's used in a particular situation. Today, I am going to teach you about the prepositions "to", "on", and "about". We're going to focus on their usage with adjectives in sentences about behaviour -- that means the way someone acts. First we'll learn what these prepositions mean when talking about behaviour, then I'll teach you some common collocations that use these prepositions, and finally, we will test your understanding with some example sentences. Improve your grammar, comprehension, and English speaking confidence by watching this video. AFTER WATCHING, TAKE THE QUIZ TO TEST YOURSELF: https://www.engvid.com/to-on-about-prepositions-of-behavior/ TRANSCRIPT Doo-doo-doo-doo. I really need to be less hard on myself about sports. Hi. James from engVid. Today's lesson is going to be about prepositions and behaviour. I want to show you how we use prepositions to talk about people's behaviour. Now, behaviour is how someone acts, their actions. You know, are they good to you, nice to you? So what is their behaviour like? Why is this important? Because you know prepositions is being used as one thing. Today I want to show you a lesson how we take the idea from the preposition, we put it with an adjective, and then we can talk about people's behaviour. Are you ready? Let's go to the board. "I need to be less hard on myself." Well, you know "need", you know "hard", but "hard on myself", what does that mean? Well, Mr. E is using a preposition, which is an adjective to talk about something he is doing or some way he is acting. Okay? "Hard" means strong, so he needs to be less strong on himself. In this case he needs to be nicer to himself. I used another one, "nicer to". We're going to work on this now and you're going to figure out how you can start using prepositions with adjectives to describe behaviour. Okay, so, prepositions are most often used for direction, time, and the reason. The reason why. Sorry. The reason why we do something. Right? The reason why we do something. All right? "I'm going to the store", "I'll meet you at 12 o'clock", "I did it for this". Right? "For". But they can also be used to describe people's actions, or behaviour, or what they're doing. Okay? So I'm going to give you three popular prepositions: "to", "on", and "about". I will explain each one, and then give you some collocations which are words that go together, co-location. Right? Collocation, it means they're always generally found together, that will explain behaviour. Okay? Let's go to the first one. "To". Everybody loves "to". Right? "To" means movement: "Go to the store." Right? I'm not going to say two people, because that's not a preposition, that's a number, but "to". But when we add... Use these adjectives before "to", we can say: "cruel to". "He's cruel to you". "Cruel" means not very nice. Cruel is not nice, so he's cruel... But, look. See how we have direction? Remember I said "to" means direction? "He's cruel to you." So the direction of his not-niceness goes to you. On the next one we have "kind to". "Kind" means nice. They are nice or generous. Right? So, when someone's kind to you, they are nice to-you got it, direction again-you. Direction. "Rude". You know when someone's rude they act in a way that's not nice, they show disrespect to you. Right? They say bad words or something. When someone's "rude to", here we go again, "to" means direction and that direction is to whoever they say, rude to them, rude to him, rude to me. Okay? Who is the object? And "helpful to", that's right. Somebody or something was helpful to you, they gave you some help when you need it. Help, and then full of help, they were full of help to you. So we've just discussed "to" and we know it means movement, and in this case direction, and these adjectives help us... Tell us what the behaviour or actions are that they are doing to you. Okay? You like that one? I got another one. It's a three-for-one sale, I'm going to teach you three. Okay? "On". Usually when we say "on" we mean to put on, like on top, like on the surface of something, "on". As direction means... "To" means direction, "on" means on the surface or put it on. And as you can see, I put my hand on me which means something, I bet you're going to understand, is going to come on me. Okay? So we want to use these adjectives before "on". You can see my little picture, "on". "Tough on", you know, Colgate is tough on grease or tough on this. "Tough" means hard or strong.
How To Speak American English Like a Native Speaker
 
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http://www.pronunciationpro.com/youtube-free-trial/ Sign up for a free 7-day trial of our proven 12-week online program when you register for our Basic monthly membership. Only $19.97/month after the 1st free week of accent reduction practice. Cancel Anytime! Want personalized instruction and feedback? Sign up for our PLUS package today with affordable PAYMENT PLANS: http://get.pronunciationpro.com/pluspackage/ If your goal is to learn how to speak American English like a native speaker then I'm glad you found me and my English Pronunciation YouTube Channel!! Hi, my name is Annie Ruden M.S. CCC-SLP and I’ve been teaching people like you from around the world how to speak American English with an American accent for many years now. Learning to speak English with an American accent is possible and it's not as hard as you would think. It’s simply a matter of learning to hear the difference between American English sounds and rhythm and then learning how to reshape your old habits of a foreign accent to new habits of moving your mouth the way native English speakers do. I’ve taught hundreds of students how to speak English fluently and confidently and I know I can help you too. It's important, however, to make sure you have the right American Accent Training Program to help you accomplish your goal. There are plenty of free videos on YouTube that teach American English pronunciation. You might learn a few tips from these free English pronunciation lessons and it might help a little but to fully and permanently reduce your accent and gain confidence in the way you speak American English you’re going to need something more. You need an English pronunciation and fluency course that will show you step by step exactly how to hear the difference between American English sounds and rhythm and the way you are speaking English with an accent. You also need an American accent program that will show you exactly how to move your mouth in a way to pronounce English sounds correctly. You then need an English pronunciation and fluency course that will help you practice and bring all of these English fluency skills together so you can speak English clearly and with confidence. That’s what the Pronunciation Pro online training course will do for you! Go to http://www.pronunciationpro.com/youtube-free-trial/ to learn more about my online program. The right accent reduction training program follows research based strategies that are proven to reduce your accent. I have the highest level of education to provide accent reduction training with these strategies. Combine my education with several years of hands on practice helping students learn how to speak American English like a native speaker and you can be confident you are learning from the best. I can say that with confidence because I see my students succeed through this American English training program. I hear it all the time, “your course has helped me feel way more confident speaking English”. It’s the goal we have for all of our accent reduction students because when you speak English with confidence then you can accomplish amazing things! My English pronunciation program is all available online so you can learn conveniently at your own pace. We have English pronunciation trainers that will help you personally learn how to speak confidently with an American accent. We have our proven, intensive 12 week English pronunciation video program and then an additional 40 weeks of additional English pronunciation lessons and videos to help you practice and refine your American accent. This is how you will learn to speak American English like a native speaker. With time, practice, and the right English pronunciation course you will confidently stand in front of your colleagues, boss, interviewer, or friends and speak English clearly and with great confidence! My goal is to help you accomplish your goals. As you learn to speak American English like a native speaker then you can go on to get a better job, a promotion, make new friends, and fully realize your goals and dreams. I know you can do it and we are here to help! Visit http://www.pronunciationpro.com/youtube-free-trial/ to see how you can get started! Pricing starts at only $19.97 per month.
Views: 3401132 Pronunciation Pro
Speaking English - Clean yourself!!!
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Would you like to brush up on your English and wash away mistakes? Watch this lesson on the vocabulary we use in English to talk about cleaning ourselves! You'll learn when to use verbs like wash, wipe, brush, clean, floss, and more. Wipe away any doubts about this topic with the lesson and free quiz: http://www.engvid.com/speaking-english-clean-yourself/
English Grammar - How to learn tenses - ALL tenses!!
 
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http://www.engvid.com The most effective way to learn English grammar! In this lesson for all levels, I teach you a way to learn all tenses in English without getting complicated. A simple, clear way to learn each tense. You can use this method for other topics, too!
Master Modals with the SEAM method - may, might, could, etc.
 
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http://www.engvid.com Learn how to master the meaning and usage of modals. This grammar lesson will teach you how to express possibility, prohibition, ability, necessity, and more with the appropriate modals.
Modals in English - MUST
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ In this advanced English grammar lesson, you will learn how and when to use the modal "must". Take the free quiz on this lesson at http://www.engvid.com/modals-must/
REMEMBER ANYTHING with the Memory Palace Method
 
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There is a lot of memorization that goes into learning a new skill, and learning English is no exception. In this lesson, I will teach you a useful strategy that will help you memorize and remember almost anything. It's called the "memory palace", and you can start using it today. I will show you the three keys to making the memory palace work for you. You will learn how to make associations to help your brain remember not only words, but also their specific order. The memory palace will help you remember all sorts of material in any subject. Make the memory palace a regular part of your study routine, and see how much your memory improves. I will give you exercises to challenge your memory in the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/remember-anything-with-the-memory-palace-method/ WATCH NEXT: 1. How to use MIND MAPS to REMEMBER everything you read: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k1rwf370z5E&list=PL1MxVBsQo85qbTHKgEgpCh7ytX9uyIsYY&index=39 2. How to use your dictionary to improve your VOCABULARY: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RyxtYRkzqcg&t=0s&list=PL1MxVBsQo85qbTHKgEgpCh7ytX9uyIsYY&index=1 TRANSCRIPT Silicon Valley, security of the internet, aerospace, holter, capital inflation, ambitious... Oh, how am I going to remember all this vocabulary? This is so much to... I have an idea. Hold on a second. Excuse me, guys, I have to get a book. Where did I put...? Ah, there it is. A long time ago-hey, E, we're going to get to you in a second-I had a trouble remembering vocabulary for something I was studying, and it was so difficult, and I thought: "I know, my favourite hero is, like, Sherlock Holmes, and he has what's called a memory palace, and I think that's why E did this. He said: "I'm a king. Where is my palace?" Today we're going to work on a memory palace. For you it might be more, like, a memory house or a memory room, but as your memory gets better and better, we can make it from a room to a house to a palace. A palace is a house where a king lives or a queen lives, and is huge with many, many rooms and you can do many, many things. And after I show you this method, you will figure out that you might want to start with just a room, but from there you can go from a room to a house to a workspace, like your business place or workplace, to a palace because as long as you can remember the room, you can remember vocabulary. And today we're going to have some fun because I'm going to do... Well, we're going to go step by step and do this together. I'm going to ask you to do a couple of things, you'll do them and you're going to find that your memory has increased incredibly. And we can do it for many, many things. So you guys ready? I'll take a look here. Let's get started. What do you need? Okay, you just need to right now sit down. I'm going to ask you to focus in a second or two, and then you just need to laugh. So if something's funny, laugh, have fun with it, and then we're going to see how much vocabulary you have. So the first thing I'm going to do is give you eight words. Number one: "bacon". Number two: "ball". Number three: "banana". Number four: "fish". Number five: "monkey". Number six: "Mr. E". All right, Mr. E. Number seven: "rat". And number eight: "dog". Got it? Cool. Now, what I want you to do is tell me all eight of those words. I'm waiting. I'm listening. Go. Go for it. In order. In order. Did you get all of the words? If so, good for you, you have a remarkable memory. You don't need me, turn off the video, go somewhere else. No, you better stay, because still can help you with more words than this. I'm just showing you eight because we have a limited time. Now, some people if they've done that exercise before, they'll go: "Oh, I recognize this", but don't worry about it. So, if you didn't do well, maybe you got four words or five words, but they weren't in order, you got them all over... Let me give you the words again, but this time I'm going to ask you to join me and do something, and I bet you can know all the words and you can even tell me the words out of order. Okay? So, let's do this again. But this time... And here's the trick: You have to really put the idea in your head when I give it to you. Okay? You can't just go: "Okay, okay." You have to actually see it. Okay? And when I say laugh, I mean if it's funny make it crazy as heck, make it crazy, crazy, crazy, crazy in your head. All right? So let's do the first one. I want you to imagine you're coming to a door. Okay? You come to a door, you open the door, and just before you open the door you see a piece of bacon, and the bacon's running from the bottom of the door, going: "Oh my god! Help me! Help me!" It's running out the door as fast as it can. It goes in fast motion, it runs out the door, and you're like: "Whoa! Look at that bacon run out the door. […]
"OFF" Phrasal Verbs - Business English
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Learn these common business English phrasal verbs with "OFF" that will help you understand business and financial discussions in English. These phrasal verbs might even save you some money! I'll teach you the meaning of phrasal verbs like: lay off, rip off, write off, take off, and more. Take a quiz on this lesson here: http://www.engvid.com/off-phrasal-verbs-business-english/ TRANSCRIPT: London, London, London. Hi. James, from EngVid. Secret London. I was actually born here. Beautiful place. Love it. Now, I want to teach you a lesson today on phrasal verbs. We're going to work on five phrasal verbs. But this is specific. These are business phrasal verbs, so if you're in business or you're learning about business, these terms will come up regularly. Now, phrasal verbs and idioms in English are used, and you're expected to know them like that. So let's go to the board and see where's Mr. E. Mr. E wants to teach us something today about "off". Well, the first thing we have to learn, specifically, "off" has about five meanings. But today, we're going to concentrate on two. And all of these ones here are basically going to, you know, relate to those two meanings. "Off" either means to move away from something or to go down. All right? To make smaller or reduce in size. And these phrasal verbs are used in business quite often. If you know anything about what's happened in the last five years, you're going to go, "Oh, my gosh. That's what they were talking about." So let's talk about the first one, "take off". If you're like me and you work a lot -- I don't work a lot. Okay. I don't work lot. I'm being honest. But sometimes, you need a vacation, and I take vacations. So you need to "take off". But in English, what we say in business, when you go to your boss, and you say, "Boss, I would like some time off." They will say, "Would you like to take some time off?" Or you might say, "I want to take some time off in the summer. I want to take off a month." So you'll hear this phrase "take off" "take off". And it means for vacation. But there's also another meaning, which is really, really good. And this is -- remember; we're talking about "away from" when we're talking about "off" because of "take off". You can see the airplane. The airplane takes off. That's for your vacation because I know you're going somewhere sunny like Canada in January. Anyway. Don't come here in January. It's not sunny; it's cold. But another thing -- see how the airplane is taking off, so it means it's leaving? Airplanes go up. When somebody goes up and things are going really well, they say, "My business is taking off." It means it's doing well. So your boss might say -- or he or she might say, "I really want this idea to take off because it will be good for the company." It means they want the idea to be successful. If something takes off, it's successful. "We started a new water brand, and it's taking off in Italy." They love it. Canadian water. Who knew? Okay? And it "took off". It means it's successful. It's doing really well. Now, let's look at another one. This is close to my heart because recently, I found out there's a company across the sea -- imagine a country called "India" -- where they actually took everything about me except my face and my name, and wrote my bio out. It's called a "rip off". But we'll get to that. If you have a store and you have products --books or markers, okay -- and you see someone come in, and then they take it, and they run out of your store, and they don't pay you, you would say, "I wasn't paid." You can say, "That person ripped me off." That means that person stole from me. And we use that for when someone takes physical objects and takes them without paying from a store. So you can say, "The store was ripped off" because the product was taken and no money was given for it." Okay? That's one form of "to rip off". Another is if you were the customer or client. If you go to my store and I sell this water for five dollars, and then you walk to Mr. E's store and see the exact same water but more water inside going for one dollar, you'll say, "I was ripped off." It's similar to being stolen from because what it means is, "I paid more than the value of the object." The object is only worth a dollar, but these people made me pay five. I feel ripped off. Something was taken from me, and it wasn't fair. I didn't get the value. Rip off. Water is a rip off. It's free, people. Check the clouds. It comes down regularly. Anyway. Next. The next thing for "rip off" is to steal an idea. Told you this was business phrasal verbs. Lots of times, McDonald's says, "Burger King's got a new burger. Let's rip it off." And they make the same product, and they call it the McSomething. Burger King did it first; McDonald's steals it.
Learn English: Expressions that use body parts!
 
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Head, ear, chin, lip, arm, chest, leg, foot, back... These are some of the body parts that are used in many common expressions in English. In this English lesson, I'll teach you the meaning of useful expressions like "You're always on my back", "Keep your chin up", "raises an eyebrow", and even some strange ones such as "makes my blood boil". These sayings bring your English to life by expressing how you feel. From head to toe, all body parts are covered. Watch the lesson to learn more. I know you'll give it a thumbs up! https://www.engvid.com/expressions-body-parts/ TRANSCRIPT E, what did I tell you about leaving your socks on the fl...? Hi. James from engVid. Little upset now. E leaves his socks all over the place. He only has one foot, but he seems to leave them everywhere. I'm always on your back? This lesson is about body parts, like the back, and how we use them to show or express our feelings, emotions, or thoughts on a situation. Stick with me, and we'll take your head out of the clouds and teach you some English. You ready? Let's go to the board. Notice E is saying: "You're always on my back!" Well, I'm going to come over here and I'm going to show you the body parts, and then I'll show you an idiom... Or, sorry, let's say a phrase or an expression that we use to indicate our thoughts or feelings on something, or about someone. Right? So, why don't we start with...? Well, what does it say here? Number one, your head. Okay? Your head. If someone says: "Your head is in the clouds", you're a dreamer, which means you don't really think about real things; work, eating, life. You're thinking: "One day I'm going to fly off and I'm going to visit a country, and I'm going to..." And someone will say: -"Do you have money?" -"No." You're a dreamer. Your head is in the clouds. Right? Get your head out of the clouds. Come back to reality. Come back to the real world. That's number one: "head in the clouds". Let's look at number two: "let your hair down". This is kind of funny because I really don't have any hair. Let's just say I had hair. Okay? And my hair is up, like this. Okay? My hair is up. Okay? If I let my hair down, I'm going to relax. My hair is now relaxed. You like that? Purple. It's cool. "Let your hair down" means have fun, relax, take it easy. Don't be so serious. Okay? And that's our hair there. Just see that? Let it down, relax a bit. How about number three? "Be all ears". Well, clearly I have only two and I cannot be covered with ears, but "be all ears" means I am focused, I am incredibly... I'm listening to you right now, incredibly focused. So when someone is all ears, it means I'm listening, you have my attention, I'm not thinking of anything but what you are saying. "Be all ears", and there are your ears. Okay? How about this one? "Lip service". Those are little lips. Maybe you can't see them. So here are mine. Lips. Lip service is funny. "Service" means to do something for someone. But "lip service", it's actually... Because I have "insincere", but that might be a big word for you. But it means I don't really believe it or I don't really want to do it. So, when you give lip service you say: "Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah", but you really aren't going to do it or you really don't believe in it. Example: Your mother comes home and said: "Okay, you know what? You put the plate over there and the cup over there. Could you do me a favour? Could you pick it up and put it away?" And you're watching or playing video games or soccer, and you're like: "Yeah, yeah, yeah, I'll do it. Uh-huh. Uh-huh." You have no intention or you're not going to do it. You just say: "Yeah, yeah, yeah" to make your mother happy so she thinks you're going to do it, but you're not going to. If your boss or employer gives you lip service, they say: "Sure, we'll give you more money. Everything will be okay. Just go back to work." It's lip service. They're not going to give you any more money, but they expect you to go back to work. Watch out for lip service. Right? Lips. Let's look at number five. Chin, this is your chin right here. If you've ever seen Superman, Superman has a chin of steel. Big chin. Okay? Now, when somebody says: "Keep your chin up", your chin is probably here and you're: "[Whines]". You're upset and they say: "Keep your chin up. Don't be sad. Be happy. Be strong, like Superman." That's your chin right here, right underneath your lips. Chin. Okay? "Be on someone's back", that's what E was saying. Well, if you've ever had to carry something really big, I don't know, like... Hold on a second. I'm still here. This is on my back. It's really heavy and it bothers me. You know? It's a pain. It's upsetting. When something's on your back, it's always... They're always bothering you. "Oh, you're always on my back asking about giving you money" or "You're always on my back asking me to help you.
8 'head' phrasal verbs - head up, head out, head off...
 
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Head to http://www.engvid.com for help with vocabulary! In this lesson we will look at phrasal verbs that use the verb 'head' with different prepositions to mean different things. You'll learn the meaning of head to, head up, head over, and more. Head over to http://www.engvid.com/phrasal-verbs-head/ to take the quiz! TRANSCRIPT Hi again. I'm Adam. In today's lesson we're going to look at phrasal verbs, and today's phrasal verb is -- starts with -- "head": "head up", "head down", "head out", "head over", "head in" or "head inside" - both okay -, "head back", "head off", "head for". Okay? These are the ones we're going to look at and we're going to give examples of each one. First thing to notice: I have... I've grouped these all into one bunch. Basically, these all mean "go". So when we say "head" with any one of these it means "go", but where we go, the direction we go, that changes with each preposition. So let's look at them. When I say: "head up" generally I'm talking about going north. Okay? So if I'm in the US, I'm going to head up to Canada because I'm going north. If I'm in Canada, I'm going to head down to the States. Generally speaking, when we travel or when we go somewhere or drive somewhere especially, we use "head up", "head down". So again, "head up", "head down". If you're going east or west, you basically just "head over" to wherever you're going. Actually let me get to this one: so "head over" means go to a destination or go to a place. So I'm sure some of you have heard the expression "come over". -"Hey, what are you doing?" -"Nothing." -"Well, come over." "Over" means over to my house or over to where I am. So if you're going to head over to somewhere, you're going to go to a specific place. My friend calls me says: "Well, do you want to come over?" And I say: "Yeah, I'll head over right now." Means I'm going to come to your house right now. That goes with "head out". "Head out" basically means "go" but it also means "leave". Okay? So if I'm going to "head out in five minutes" means I'm going to leave here in five minutes; I'm going to go in five minutes. My friend calls me up, says: "Hey, you're late. Where are you?" Say: "Oh, sorry. I got, some things came up. I'm going to head out in five minutes." -- I'm going to leave in five minutes. If you're sitting outside, nice sunny day, drinking with your friends and then you get a little bit tired and you want to go inside your house you say: "I'm going to head in." Okay? "I'm going to head inside." Basically means "go in", "go inside". Usually you would say this when the "in" is understood like if you're outside your house, you're going to head in. If you're in a patio of a restaurant and there's too much sun, "I'm going to head in" or "head inside" -- inside the restaurant. Okay? "Head back" -- go back. We're going for a little trip and I'm getting a little bit tired or a little bit bored and I say: "You know what? Ah, forget it. I'm going to head back." I'm going to turn around, go back where I came from. Okay, all very easy. These two are a little bit different. "Head off" basically means to stop something from happening or to block, and I'll even say here prevent something from happening. Okay? So my girlfriend found out that my ex-girlfriend lives in the same city, and she found out that my ex-girlfriend is going to come over to my house and try to hook up again. So my girlfriend is going to go head her off, she's going to go and block the way; she's not going to let her get to me. Okay? She's going to "head her off at the pass", we say -- it's an expression. Old western movies, you got the cowboys, you got the Indians and the Indians are coming in for attack, and the cowboys, they head them off at the pass. Now, it could also mean to make them change course or make whoever, make something change course. Basically means make it change direction. So I'm going this way, somebody came to head me off and make me go this way instead of this way. Okay, easy. "Head for" also means "go" but it's not so much "go", it's more about move, move towards something specifically or even aim. Okay? So there's an old expression: "Head for the hills." If there's a flood coming, if it's raining very heavily and the water's starting to rise, head for the hills; go toward the hills that are higher, you can keep your feet dry. Okay? So these are all the different uses of "head" with a preposition. Head north: head up; head down: south; head out: leave or go; head over: go to a specific spot or place that you spoke with someone about; head back: go back; head off: stop, block, make change direction; head for a specific place. Now, if you want to get detailed examples, if you want sentences using all of these, go to www.engvid.com. There's a quiz there -- you can try out all these phrasal verbs. Also, check out my YouTube site and subscribe to it. And come back again; visit us, we'll give you another lesson. Thank you.