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How to speak naturally in English: Reduction Mistakes
 
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Have you heard how native speakers shorten their words when they speak with each other? This is called "reduction", and you may have already started using this in your own English. If so, watch out for some common mistakes when reducing words. The expressions "I havta", "I wanna", and "I'm gonna" are examples of reductions. If you have never learned about reduction, now is your chance to understand native speakers better, and to become more fluent in English yourself! Test yourself with the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-speak-naturally-in-english-reduction-mistakes/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. Do you have problems understanding when native English people talk to you? Yes? If your answer is yes, this lesson is for you. Second question. Do you know how to reduce words in English so that you sound more fluent? Maybe? Maybe you're not sure. Okay. Perfect. We're going to do three things in this lesson. The very, very first thing that we're going to do is I'm going to teach you why you don't understand when native people speak to you. Two, I'm going to teach you how to reduce words in English to make you sound more fluent or to help you sound more natural. And three, I'm going to help you with some mistakes that you maybe will make when you are reducing these words. Some of you have already learned how to do the reductions in English. Hold on. You still have to watch this lesson because unfortunately, you're making mistakes when you do this. So three things; one lesson. Let's hit it. Reduction mistakes. Good. The first thing we have to know is regularly how we say these words. So for example, if we have "it", "she", "he", in English, we have "wants to". If we have "I ", "you", "we", and "they", we have "want to". What's the difference? One difference makes a world of difference because "he", "she", and "it" have the S, the way that we say this in the reduction is going to be different than if there was no S. So check this out. "I wanna; you wanna; we wanna; they wanna." Perfect. Your turn. "I wanna; you wanna; we wanna; they wanna." This is how we reduce "want to". So the reason why you don't understand native speakers is they will say to you, "Do you wanna beer?" "Giovanna? Who's -- I'm not Giovanna. This is my friend Giovanna. How do you know her name?" We don't say, "Do you want a beer"; we say, "Do you wanna beer?" It's really, really, really fast, and we never divide "want to"; we say "wanna". If we have "it", "she", and "he", we say "wantsta". So "it wantsta; she wantsta; he wantsta". Your turn. "It wantsta." Good. "She wantsta; he wantsta." Good work. Do it again. Okay. You got it. Good. So when you have "he/she/it", you have to say "wantsta". When you have "I/you/we/they", you have to say "wanna". Good. This is a mistake. You cannot say "it", "she", and "he" with "wanna". I hear every day people saying, "She wanna go home." "She wanna go home? No. "She wantsta go home." So you have to be really, really careful with the S. We call this subject and verb agreement. If you have "he", "she", or "it", you have to put the S on the verb. Even when we speak quickly and we reduce things, it's really important that you have to put the S on the verb again. This rule never fails. So "it, she, or he wanna"? Mm-hmm. This is a mistake. Please be careful can your S sound. Are you ready for another one? Are you excited? Again, we're playing with the basic subjects of "I", "you", "we", "they". Okay? The next set of verbs we have is "have to", so "I have to go." So maybe you're at a party, and maybe one of your friends who speaks English says, "I havta go." "I havta? What is 'havta'?" You think about it, and you go, "Ah. 'Have to'. You have to go." "Yeah. I havta go." We don't say "have to"; we say "havta". If we're talking about another person, he, she, or it as a thing, again, because of our subject and verb agreement, we have to change this to "has to". So in the reduced form, we're going to say "hasta" like "pasta". So "I havta", "you havta", "we havta", "they havta". Your turn. Go. Good. "He hasta", "she hasta", "it hasta". Go. He -- she -- it -- you got it. Good. Uh-ho. Mistake. It's the same mistake as here. You can't say "he", "she" or "I havta" because "havta" is only for "I", "you", "we", and "they". This is a really common mistake in written grammar and also in spoken. Even when it's reduced and spoken informally -- or slang if you'd like to -- we have to be very careful, when you're reducing words, that your grammar is still okay. Oh, grammar is always there to haunt you. Okay. The last one. Very, very common, we say "I am going to". We say "I'm gonna". "I'm gonna go home." "Gonna? Who's 'gonna'? Where's 'gonna'?" We don't say, "I'm going to go home." We say, "I'm gonna. I'm gonna go." Your turn. "I'm gonna go." Good.
Learn English - 4 ways to understand what you hear
 
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Learn how to understand almost everything you hear right now in 4 easy steps! If you are an advanced English student, and you already know grammar and can understand what you read, but have trouble understanding when people speak in movies and in real life, watch this lesson to find out HOW to listen and UNDERSTAND! http://www.engvid.com/4-listening-comprehension-tips/
TOP 10 MOVIES FOR LEARNING ENGLISH
 
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What are the top movies for learning English? And how do you choose a good movie to help you improve English skills? Watch this video lesson to find out! When I was learning Spanish, I watched every Spanish movie I could get my hands on, and it helped my listening skills, vocabulary and pronunciation -- a lot! Movies can help you learn fluent English because they show you natural language and real culture. They give you something fun to talk about with an English speaking partner, too! Top 10 Movies for Learning English: 1. Forrest Gump 2. The King's Speech 3. The Break-up 4. The Hangover 5. 500 Days of Summer 6. The Shawshank Redemption 7. Castaway 8. Toy Story 9. The Hunger Games 10. The Social Network Have you seen any of these movies? What do you think of the list? Leave a comment! See all Go Natural English lessons at https://gonaturalenglish.com Follow me on IG: http://instagram.com/gonaturalenglish Twitter: http://twitter.com/gonaturaleng Facebook: http://facebook.com/gonaturalenglish -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- "HOW TO LEARN ENGLISH FLUENTLY, EASILY & FAST BY YOURSELF" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UwJwmrFcwC0 -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
How to understand native English speakers: "Whaddya...?"
 
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Why is it so hard to understand native English speakers? Because we use relaxed speech. Most English speakers will combine words, leave out letters, and even change letters! But you can understand by learning how and why these changes happen. And when you understand, your pronunciation and comprehension will improve. In this lesson, I'll explain some of the most common pronunciation changes that English speakers make, so that you can understand what native speakers are saying. Once you learn these changes, practice listening for them with native speakers, or with your favorite English shows or movies. Find some usages of relaxed speech in a show or movie and tell me in the comments what you found. https://www.engvid.com/understand-native-english-speakers-relaxed-speech/ TRANSCRIPT Doo-doo-doo-doo-doo. What am I going to make for dinner tonight? Hey. James from engVid. Whaddya want to learn today? Excuse me. "Whaddya mean?" Oh, sorry, he's saying: "What do you mean?" What do you want to learn? We're doing two quick pronunciation tricks. When I'm saying that it's a little bit different, when I say two different pronunciation tricks, I'm going to teach you what's called relaxed speech in English or when we make... We blur words together. Sometimes we blur words, we make words, two words into one, sometimes three words become one, so when you hear it you think you're hearing one word, when in reality what you're hearing is three words and sometimes we drop the sound. Today I'm going to give you two very common phrases, that if you learn to say it properly, you'll sound like a native speaker, which is really cool. Right? So let's go to the board and take a look. To start off with, Mr. E... Hey, say: "Hi", E. Okay? Mr. E is saying: "Whaddya mean?" Try it. If you look in your Google Translator or your phone, you'll notice this word doesn't exist, but it does for us English people, and in fact it's for two different things that are not related. I'll show you a trick so you know what it is you're saying; or when someone's speaking to you, what it is they mean. Let's go. First things first, this is real English, relaxed speech. I have two statements. The first statement is: "What are you doing?" Right? "What are you doing?" Pretty clear and understandable. And the second statement is: "What do you want?" They're not the same at all, you can see with your eyes. But when I say it, actually it's going to come out like this: "Wad-da-ya doing? Wad-da-ya doing?" or "Wad-da-ya want? Wad-da-ya want?" The sound... This is phonetic spelling, so I'm just trying to show you the: "Wad-da-ya", "Wad-da-ya", basically sounds like this: "Whaddya", okay? And it's when we've cut sounds, and there's reasons we do it and I'll explain here why. When we speak very fast, especially when there's a "t" or a "d" involved in English, we tend to either change the "t" to a "d"-okay?-or we actually just get rid of it. An example is "often". In English you'll sometimes hear people say: "Often", "I often do this", but more casual is to say: "I ofen", the "t" is just dropped. It's understood to be there. Okay? "Often", but it's just dropped. And a lot of times people have trouble saying the word: "Bottle", you saw my face, like: "I want a bottle of Coke", it's difficult to say, even for us, so we say: "I want a bodle", "bodle", and that double "t" actually becomes almost a "d" sound, so: "bodle". "I want a bottle of Coke or a bottle of beer." We tell you to say "t", but we don't even do it ourselves because we're lazy. And speaking about lazy, I want to talk about the second reason this funny thing occurs here where we have: "Whaddya" instead of the words that are supposed to be there. When we have lazy vowels... Lazy vowels we call the schwa, schwa. I'm exaggerating because I open my mouth too much. When you do the schwa, it's like an "uh", you barely move your mouth. In fact, later on I'm going to show you a test you can do to see the schwa for yourself. Okay? Here's two examples for you because we barely say them, like the word: "problem". It's not "probl-e-m", you don't say the "e" really, you just kind of, like, make it fall with the "m" so it becomes "um": "problum". Right? And when you say: "family", do you say: "fam-i-ly"? No. You say: "Famly". It's "fam-ly", it just blends right in there. Okay? So now we've taken a look at this and "whaddya", and I just want to explain something, how it happened. Remember we said the "t"? The "t" gets dropped here. Okay? We just take it out. And the "r" we don't even say. It goes from here-you see?-there goes the "t" becomes a "d" there. Right? "What are", "What are ya", and we just drop it right off. Here it's even more obvious you can see it because we take the "t", and make that an "a" over here. We do that a lot in English with "o", we change o's to "a". Okay, so here are we. We drop that, we put the "t" to a "d" here, once again that drops off, and we have: "whaddya".
Fix Your Bad English
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Read this: After watching this video you will make less mistakes, learn farther and be the best between all your friends in English. The lesson will have a great affect on you. If you think these statements are correct, PRESS PLAY NOW and learn to fix six common mistakes in English. http://www.engvid.com/6-ways-to-fix-your-bad-english/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. James, from EngVid. Today's video is on, well, "The Book of Bad English". There are mistakes that native speakers make that ESL people pick up -- and "ESL" is "English as a Second Language". People learning English, they pick up because native speakers don't even know they're making this mistake. So I want to teach you six common ones that come regularly or happen regularly in conversation. And I want you to learn them and make your English perfect. Let's go to the board. Now, let's start with No. 1, one of my favorite ones: "amount" and "number". "Amount" is, sort of, like, "how much". A "number" is, you know, "thing". When we look at "amount", you can think of you can't count it, all right? A lot of times, when we say "amount" -- like, "I have a large amount of water in my house" -- you can't count water. But you can count a number, so: "The number of people who come to the city is in the thousands", so you can count them. Here's an example. Tell me if this is right or wrong. "The amount of students who are late is growing every day" or "the number of students who are late is growing every day." You should say "number" because you can count students. You can't count amount. That rhymes. Maybe that'll help, right? You can't count amount. You can't count amount. So when we want to talk about a number of something or a body of something, "amount" is for things you cannot count, and "number" is for things you can count. English people make this mistake a lot. Next: "among" and "between". When I used to teach "among" and "between", I would say, "'Among' is 'with'. So there're five chairs, and you're 'with' another. And 'between' is you're in the middle." That's it. Because I was so smart. And then I found out it's just this: two. More than two. That's it. Nothing special. When you talk about "between", except -- and this is a major exception -- when you're talking about differences. Differences you have to use "between". But generally speaking, "among" is more than two. "I was sitting among my friends at the bar." You can know there're probably four or five, not two. But "let's keep this between you and me"? A lot of times, Canadians say, "Let's keep this among us." And it's like, "Among who?" "The rest of those guys, you know. The Americans. They don't need to know this." Okay. So "between us" -- usually two, right? It could be two groups. "There was a fight between this country and that country." Right? Because it's two groups. But "among" is for more than two, cool? All right. So "among" -- more than two; "between" -- two. What about "bring" and "take"? This is something that a lot of students make a mistake on. So you say, "Bring this to me" or "take this to him." It's very easy. "Bring" is "to the speaker", okay? And "take" is "away from the speaker". Now, if you're born in England, that's easy because they always talk about "I want takeaway." Takeaway. Because they take the food away from the restaurant, right? So one of my favorite sayings that we say in England -- not England -- that we say here is, like -- watch every space movie: "Take me to your leader." You'll never see a space movie, unless it's made by me -- and it would say, "Bring me to your leader." We don't do that. You say, "Take them to the leader" because you're taking them away from this spot where the speaker is to a new location or spot. So "take" and "bring" are easy because it's "bring -- come towards". Here's a mistake -- not Canadians -- English speakers make that you should be aware of. They'll say something like, "Don't forget to bring your bag with you" instead of, "Don't forget to take your bag." Do you know what the difference is? Well, you're leaving, right? So you need to take it away. Remember I said "away from"? Take the bag away from you. When you say, "Bring the bag with you", the speaker's speaking, you're still moving away from the speaker, right? So you've got to use this. But Canadians and Americans and Brits say it a lot. They'll say, "Bring it with you." No. "Take" it with you. You know the difference now because you're smart. And you're studying from The Book of Bad English. Good for you. There's a worm in that book. Watch it. Okay. "Fewer" or "less". I'm going to make a statement, and think which one is correct. "'Fewer' than a million people have watched the videos on EngVid. 'Less' than a million people have watched the videos on EngVid." Which one would be correct? Yeah. If you said "less than", no. "Less" is similar to "amount". You say "fewer" for things you can count.
Learn English: How to understand native speakers
 
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Do you find it hard to understand casual English conversations? It's not your fault! Native speakers don't speak clearly, but you still need to understand them. In daily conversation, we take shortcuts in our speech. This is usually done by "dropping" consonant sounds. In today's video I'll explain why this happens, and how you can improve your understanding of native speaker pronunciation. You'll get to hear some of the most common words and expressions that English speakers drop consonants from so you'll be prepared when you hear them. I'll also teach you strategies to improve your English listening skills and recommend some listening exercises you can do while listening to music and watching movies. http://www.engvid.com/learn-english-how-to-understand-native-speakers/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today's lesson is a little bit tricky because I want to help you understand native speakers. I want you to understand how they speak. So, for example, if you hear somebody say: "What did you do that for?" You should be able to understand what the person said. Now, whether you understood what I just said or not, not important yet; we're going to get to that. So "Native Speaker Pronunciation". Now, before I get into this lesson, I want you to understand: I don't want to teach you how to speak like this. Okay? I don't want you to speak like this. I want you to speak good, clear, strong English, just like I'm speaking to you now. But I also want you to understand that when I am with my Canadian friends, for example, I speak a little bit more like this. It's just natural, it's habit. It's not a good habit, but it's habit. Okay? Now, I had a few comments on www.engvid.com, quite a few people asking me: Why do I understand you? Like why do you understand me, Adam, but when I watch a TV show or when I watch a movie, I don't know what they're saying? Why? Why such a big difference? Well, first of all, let me say that I am speaking to you, knowing what you can and cannot understand, for the most part. So I don't speak to you like I... Like I would with my Canadian friends who are native English speakers. I don't speak to you like Hollywood actors speak on the movie. Okay? I'm speaking to an audience. I know that they need to listen to me, that you need to understand everything I say, so I enunciate, I speak very clearly. I stress each syllable so that you can catch every word I say. But I'm going to talk about when and where to speak like this in a minute. So, I did actually do a lesson about how to speak like a native speaker before. You can learn how to make elisions, how to connect sounds, how to... When you have two sounds that are the same, to drop one of them. This is a little bit different. We're going to look at dropped sounds inside words. Now, these words, for example: "listen", no "t"; "plumber", no "b"; "dumb", no "b". These words are not dropped sounds words. These are just the way these words are constructed; we are supposed to make the "t" silent, we are supposed to make the "b" silent. That's just how the word is built. But native speakers, native English speakers... And I'm sure this is the same in your native language if you pay attention carefully to how you speak and how your friends speak, we like to take shortcuts. Okay? We don't like too many syllables. We like to have fewer and fewer syllables to make the speech go faster. We don't want to think too much about what we're saying. So, for example, here are a few words. Now, I'm looking at consonant clusters. Does everybody remember what a consonant is? B, c, d, f, g, etc. Vowels: a, e, i, o, u. All the other letters, consonants. So when we have consonant clusters, these are groups when you have consonants bunched together; you have a few of them together. When we have words with this situation, we tend to drop one, maybe two of those consonants. So, for example, the word "probably". Pro-bab-ly, pro-bab-ly-. I have three syllables in this word, but when I'm speaking in natural speed, I say: "Probly". -"Are you coming to the party tomorrow night?" -"Yeah, probly." Now you're watching me on a TV or you're watching me in a movie, and you're thinking: -"What?" -"Probly." -"What?" -"Probly." Okay? All I'm saying is "probably", but what I'm doing, because I have "b, b, l", I have a little cluster of consonant sounds, I'll just drop this one; I don't need it. You'll understand me without it, right? I think with another native speaker. "Probly". "Good bye", even two consonants, ah, too much. "Gobye. Gobye". I barely even say the o's, I just say like: "Gobye". Okay? "Old friend". Now, in the other video, I told you if the letters... The very last letter and the first letter are the same, you can drop one, but we do it anyway, even if they're not the same. "I have an ol' friend. Ol' friend who I met for dinner last night. Oh, I met an ol' friend from high school."
How to improve your listening in English
 
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http://www.engvid.com Do you have trouble understanding what native speakers say? What to improve your English listening and comprehension skills? I'll give you some great tips that will help you to listen and understand! http://www.engvid.com/improve-your-listening-in-english/
Learn English in 24 Hours with EnglishClass101 TV
 
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Learn English with the best FREE online resources. Click here: https://goo.gl/R5QgnT ↓ Check How Below ↓ Step 1: Go to https://goo.gl/R5QgnT Step 2: Sign up for a Free Lifetime Account - No money, No credit card required Step 3: Learn with the best online resources and quickly become conversational. Click here to get started with English: https://goo.gl/R5QgnT You are a beginner in English and want to get started with English language? This is the perfect place for you! With this 24h lessons stream, you’ll be able to start learning the best way. From English vocabulary to pronunciation, going through grammar or learning tips...and much more, your English level will never be the same again! ■ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/englishclass101 ■ Twitter: https://twitter.com/EnglishClass101 Also, please LIKE, SHARE and COMMENT on our videos! We really appreciate it. Thanks!
English Grammar: The Prepositions ON, AT, IN, BY
 
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English for Beginners: Prepositions are short words that help us express location, time, and other relationships between people and things. Some examples of prepositions are: on, at, in, and by. Do you know how to use them? For example, do we say, "I am on a taxi" or "in a taxi"? Do you like to travel "in a plane" or "by plane"? After watching this simple but useful lesson, you will know exactly which preposition to use in any situation. Test yourself with our quiz: http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-the-prepositions-on-at-in-by/ TRANSCRIPT I'm having a hard time reading on the train right now. Unh. Hold on. I'll start the lesson. Hi. James from engVid. Sorry, I was on the train. I want to teach you a lesson about four basic prepositions that we use in English that sometimes get confused, and I understand why, so I'll keep it basic. But because it's basic, it's going to be 80% correct. That's a good thing, that means you can go to the website and learn more from other lessons we have. But just know that sometimes there'll be exceptions, and I may not cover it here today. I'll even give you two exceptions to help you, but why waste time? Let's go to the board. Here's Mr. E. You'll notice he has a calendar, he has a clock, and: "You are here"? Oh, here. "Here" is a location. We're here right now, doing a lesson. That's the location: engVid. Let's go to the board and do the rest of the lesson, shall we? Here's: "at", "on", "in", and "by". "At". I love it because it's very specific, so you always know where you are, exactly. Problem: For transportation, "at" doesn't have anything. Hmm. So let's go to the next one. Let's go to "on". On. "On" is used for, let's say, large vehicles or large ways of travelling, such as buses... Sorry. Trains, buses, planes, and boats. I'll come back to boat in a second; it's an exception. On the train, on the bus, and on the plane, unless you're Bill Gates, Donald Trump, or me-I'm not in that list-you don't have your own train, plane, or bus, so you usually share it with a bunch of people or a few people. It's large. So we say: "You're on the bus", because it covers a big area, so there are many people sitting in that area. When I get to location, you'll see what I mean. Boat is a small exception. For many people in the world, they have their own boats because maybe they do fishing, or rowing, which is a type of boat that you go by yourself. In that situation, you can use "in". So, if the boat is small enough, say: "in": "I'm in a boat right now." But if it's a big boat, you have to say: "I'm on a boat." Another exception for the "on" rule is bicycle. You're always "on" a bicycle. I know, I said big vehicles, but remember: a bicycle is small, and it doesn't really have a motor or an engine, so we kind of give it its own thing, because you have to sit on the bicycle, and you can never really be in a bicycle. Is that good? Now, let's go to "in". "In" is funny because there are only two things for "in". "In" we use for car and taxi. The easy way to think about it is usually you own your own car; it doesn't belong to a group of people. People just don't get on your car every time you stop it, they go in and say: "Take me somewhere." And a taxi, well, when you're in a taxi, it is kind of your car. You pay the driver and you keep the car. So, this is one of those few cases where, because it belongs to me, I am in my car or I am in the taxi, because the taxi belongs to me as long as I pay the money. It's one of these funny exceptions. I don't know why, because you can put more people in a car, but I guess because you can actually own this transportation, it's yours. Think of it like the small boat. The small boat, one person is in it, you can be inside of it. All right? Cool. The last one we're going to do is "by". This is how you get there. So, "by" is different. When we talk about "in" and "on", you are... We are talking about how you are in the vehicle. Are you sitting on the bicycle? I can see you on it? You know, a boat is on water. But "by" just means: How did you get here? So, when someone responds to you with: "By car", "by plane", they're telling you how they got here. Not if they're in the plane, or on the plane. They are just... That's how they got there. So, how did I get here to do this video? Wouldn't you like to know. I'm kidding. I came here by car. So, yes, I was in my car and drove here, but I would tell somebody: "I got here by car, not by bus", and that would tell them the difference in the transportation I took. "How did you get here?" You like that? Good, so that's "by", this is how you did it; and the way you travelled is here, "in" and "on". Remember there is a small exception for small vehicles, so a small boat you can be in. Remember small. And a bicycle, you're always on the bicycle, because people see you sitting on it. We good? Excellent. Now, that is the lesson for transportation.
Learn 10 times more vocabulary by using Word Webs!
 
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By using this system, you will learn 10–15 times more vocabulary every time you look up the meaning of a word! You'll also remember more of what you study, because you'll be making mental connections and learning in an interesting way. The secret is using 'word webs'. This powerful learning tool will change the way you learn vocabulary and idioms. In this video, I'll explain what a word web is, how to use it to learn English, and finally I'll do an example word web with you. TAKE THE QUIZ: http://www.engvid.com/learn-10-times-more-vocabulary-by-using-word-webs/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. James from engVid. I would like to help you with your vocabulary. I'm sure that you've looked at engVid and seen many lessons on vocabulary, from drinking, vacationing, weddings, all sorts of things. But when you finish the video, how much do you remember? And how much do you really understand? I'm going to teach you today something I call the... A word web to help you not just remember the words, but truly understand them, and expand or go bigger than that. I did a lesson earlier on, on mind maps where I kind of introduced the idea of mind map, but I didn't really... I don't think I got into it as much that would actually show you how to use it so that you can get better with it. So, I'm going to fix that today. All right? So what we're looking at is called a word web. And if you notice, poor Mr. E is caught up in the web. Nooooo! And I'm going to do the same with you. I'm going to get you... Because this is a spider, and the spider lives in a web, it catches things and those things can never escape. I want to do that with your memory and your vocabulary, teach you in a way that you're going to catch the words and you won't forget. Okay? So I'm going to explain the method here. So we're going to be clear on the method, then we're going to take a word and use it, and show you how it works. Ready? Let's go to the board. All right, so, word web. This is a specific form of mind map which means it's one type. There are many types. Okay? And what they... What they do is they're based on the idea that your brain works a certain way with pictures and colours. So, why don't we use these to help you? And I'm going to do that now. What you will need, you will need a ax... You will need an English to English dictionary. If you really need to get, you know, your language to English, that's fine if you really need it, but English to English dictionary will be preferable because we want to get the definition of the word from an English source, not a translated source. Okay? So maybe we should start with your translating dictionary, and then after take the English word and get an English to English. The translating dictionary will help you understand the ideas, and then the English to English. And sometimes you might notice they don't exactly say the same thing. That'll be interesting for you. Next, you're going to need access to the internet or an idioms dictionary. The idioms dictionary will be for later on, and they have them and you can even go online and look for idioms. But the joke of it is I said access to the internet. Well, my friend, if you're not on the internet, you're not watching this video, so I'm assuming you've got access to the internet. Okay. The next four steps will be this: We're going to take a word... So, we're going to take one word, whatever the word is, we're going to write out the definition from the dictionary. What the dictionary says, not what you think, not an interpretation or somebody giving you sort of their idea of it. From that, we're going to follow... Okay? We're going to write out the words you think of when you see this word. This is called association. I think: "Cat", I say: "Dog". You say: "Milk", I say: "Cow". I associate. This is the words that come to me. I want you to do that because that is part of a natural human process. You think of something, you think of something else. You think of: "Mother", you think: "Love". You think: "Money", "McDonald's"? Probably not. But you get the idea. Okay? So we're going to start with the dictionary definition, then we're going to work with how your brain works. I want to have your mind incorporated or use your way of thinking in this. So you're going to put down your words. So if it was: "Cow", you might put: "Milk, cheese, and steak". Mmm, steak. Then we're going to go out... Back to our dictionary, we're going to look for synonyms. If you open any dictionary usually it will say: "This is the word", and then it will have after it: "Here's a synonym for this word. Here's another one." Synonyms, you know, words that are similar. For instance, height and tall. How tall is the building? What is the building's height? They're not exactly the same, but they can be used in a similar or same fashion sometimes. Okay?
How to Pronounce 100 Most Important Words in English
 
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🙂Download my free e-book: "5 Steps To Becoming A Confident English Speaker" http://www.speakenglishwithvanessa.com/free-ebook --------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe and follow on social media! I'd love to meet you! YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=theteachervanessa Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/speakenglishwithvanessa Send us a postcard from your country: Vanessa Prothe PO Box 104 Asheville, NC 28802 USA --------------------------------------------------------------------- Speak English With Vanessa helps English learners to speak American English fluently, naturally, and confidently. To become a fluent English speaker and have English conversations with a native English speaker, go to http://www.speakenglishwithvanessa.com
How to start a conversation: 5 things to say after "hello"
 
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Don't know what to say? Don't worry! In this video, you'll learn easy ways to start a good, useful conversation. You'll learn how to choose topics for conversation, and I'll teach you the questions you should ask to start enjoyable and meaningful conversations! You're going to have fun, improve your English, and make friends! What could be better? Test your understanding of the lesson with the quiz! http://www.engvid.com/how-to-start-a-conversation-5-things-to-say-after-hello/ TRANSCRIPT God, I love your lips, Angelina. Hi. James from engVid. I was just thinking to myself: Well, I know it's very difficult to practice English because you don't get a lot of practice with English speakers, but if there were a way I could teach you how to get past "Hello" to make the conversation grow and perhaps have the other person come back and talk to you, that would be of great value. So this lesson is about how to get past "Hello" and make a beautiful conversation flow. All right? I'm going to use Angelina to help me later on when I do an example, but for now I will tell you more. See? He's like: "Tell me more. Hmm. I'm interested." And so am I. All right, so let's go to the board, shall we? I'm going to give you five conversation openers. You've said: "Hello", where do you go? Personally I hate this because I teach and I hear people say: "Hello. My name is James. I am from Japan, Tokyo." The conversation is essentially dead. Dunh-dunh-dunh-dunh. Don't know if that's the wedding theme or the theme from Star Wars. Doesn't matter. You understand. It's killed. Nobody cares. You've said everything that they need to know and then they're done. So why don't we do something that actually gets them to open up and want to tell you information? Okay? So the first one we're going to do is this one. I like this one. It's so easy, it's so true. Look for something that someone is wearing or has that you actually like. You're not going to steal it, so don't think about that. But what I mean is you like. You like the t-shirt, you like the jeans, the ear rings or something, you're like: "Cool", because that will be sincere. "Sincere" means that you really mean it and the person can feel that from you, so they'll want to share with you because you're being honest with them. All right? So we look here, number one, walk up and say... So it's like: "Hello. Love your __________ (jacket, t-shirt). That is so cool." Yeah? "Where did you get them?" or "Where did you get it?" Notice I didn't say: "Where did you buy it?" because some of the coolest things someone's going to be wearing won't be from this country. It might be: "Hey. I was in India and I picked up these beads. Yeah, it was really cool. I was outside this ashram and..." And now you've got a conversation you didn't even know. Or it might be: "Oh, I was downtown in the hippie section, you know, and it was really cool, there was all this art." You've started a conversation. If you say: -"...buy them?" -"At the gap." Finished. So: "Hey. Where did you get them?" Let them say "buy". Don't bring that up. Okay? Follow that up with right away... As soon as you say: "Where did you buy them...?" It's true... It might not be true right now, but it could be true, you say: "Because I really have to get a cool present", or: "...an interesting gift for my nephew/my brother/my sister/my friend." Right? Or girlfriend, whatever, or your wife. By saying that you're saying, well, one thing, you have other friends. But number two, you're giving them: "Cool". You're saying whatever they're wearing is interesting, cool, different enough that it stopped you to talk to them. By example or by extension, that means added on you're saying: "You're kind of cool, too, because you're wearing it and I think it's cool, so it's got to be cool and only a cool person would buy it." Right? This is why it works, you've given them two compliments. Who doesn't want to be complimented? First you're saying I'm wearing something cool, then you're saying: "I need to get something cool, and clearly what you have is cool." I'm probably going to talk to you and go: "Well, you know, thanks for saying that. I liked it because..." And conversation started, and now you have an opportunity to maybe later on talk more, and that's how you get your practice. Number two, how about this one? "Wow, you are __________ (tall)" or: "You have __________ (really bright eyes)", or something that has to do with the physical body. The first one was about things. Physical. Now we want to talk about physical. And you followed that up with: "What do you do?" Huh? Example, you see someone, you go: "Wow, you have amazing skin. What do you do to make it so clear?" Okay? Hmm. Or: "Wow, you're tall. What do you do? Do you play sports or anything like that?" Okay? You follow it up. This is the follow up, as I said: "What do you do?" But why does this work? Now, notice this is green and I have green up here.
Understand FAST English Conversations [Advanced Listening Practice]
 
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Join the "30 Day English Listening Challenge" today: https://www.speakenglishwithvanessa.com/listening/ Download my free e-book: "5 Steps To Becoming A Confident English Speaker" http://www.speakenglishwithvanessa.com/free-ebook --------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe and follow on social media! I'd love to meet you! YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=theteachervanessa Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/speakenglishwithvanessa Google+: https://plus.google.com/+TeacherVanessa/ Send us a postcard from your country: Vanessa Prothe PO Box 104 Asheville, NC 28802 USA --------------------------------------------------------------------- Speak English With Vanessa helps English learners to speak American English fluently, naturally, and confidently. To become a fluent English speaker and have English conversations with a native English speaker, go to http://www.speakenglishwithvanessa.com
Steps to Learning English: Where should you start?
 
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So you want to learn or improve your English. But where should you start? When you learn a new language, there is so much material to cover: vocabulary, grammar, syntax, slang, pronunciation... With so many topics to study, you may not know where to focus your attention. In this video, I will give you some tips to organize your schedule and decide what you should work on. Whether you are a beginner, intermediate, or advanced speaker, you can always find something to improve on, and I will give you the tools you need to devise a good plan. Hint: it's more simple than you think! http://www.engvid.com/steps-to-learning-english-where-to-begin/ TRANSCRIPT [Singing] Hi. James. Greer. James Greer. From engVid. [Laughs]. Not Bond, and I know you think I was going to say Bond. I know. But listen, Bond always has an important mission he's got to do, right? 007. And so do I. Today we have a mission. We're going to learn how to study English. I know in many places, many websites, they tell you, and to teach you grammar and idioms and phrasal verbs. But then, there's the big question of you, and: How do you study, and how do you choose what is important for you at this moment? Maybe you're advanced. Maybe you're a beginner. Maybe you know this, and maybe you don't. After today's lesson and we do our mission, you'll know exactly what you have to do. Okay? So, we're going to go to the board in a second, and take a look. What steps should we take in order to learn? By the time you're done this video, you'll know exactly... Or you should know where you are, where you need to go, and when you're going to be done. Ready? Let's go. E. E is standing here saying: "Where do I start? Grammar, vocabulary, or speaking?" Common, and seems to make sense, I mean, you go to learn a language-right?-you go on a website, they start throwing things at you. You go to a school, they say you need this, this, and this. But you don't really know. So, I'm going to give you the tools to decide that. First thing we're going to do is: What's the first thing you need? Grammar? No. What? Conversation? No. Vocabulary. What? Well, look. If you can't say: "bathroom" when you go to a country, you're going to pee yourself. Okay? "Hungry", you won't get food. You don't need to know everything to get basic information done. And that's what we should look at first. Basic information for a beginner really is vocabulary. And instead of all the fancy stuff you need, you don't need much. You need you, and a little bit of time, and to have some fun. Why? I'm going to suggest: For basic communication, get vocabulary. I'm telling you right now if I see you or any English-speaking person sees you, and you see... You say: "Drink. Thirsty." There's no grammar, but they'll go: "Oh, the bar is over there." If you say: "Washroom. Please", they'll go: "Oh, toilet is over there." They use sentence, you use words. Sometimes you just touch your belly and go: "Ahh!" They'll go: "Oh, you want food." You don't need all that stuff. People will tell you you need to learn grammar, and this and that. You don't. And here's how you get your first vocabulary. Do what you love to do. Play video games. I've had... I don't know how many students play video games, say they learned how to fire, duck, words that we wouldn't teach them for a while, because they were playing games. Other people come in: "Dah-dah-dah-dah-dah, [sings]", singing. I go: -"What the hell?" -"I love to sing", and they sing a song, they sound like they're just, you know, from this country. Then they speak very terrible accent. You know what I'm saying, right? [Laughs] But when they sing, it's like the gods have come down. I mean, literally, you go: "Are you...? You were born here, right?" Cool slang. You know? YOLO, you only live once. Right? ASAP, as soon as possible. When you do these things, you're learning because you want to learn. You're not even realising you're learning, and it's going to make you want to learn more because... You know, we'll get to the second one and you'll understand. But you want to communicate in a much better way. Okay? So, get the meaning of basic words. "Hungry", "food", "toilet", "money". You know that one, right? You need those things. If you have those things, you can start your adventure in learning English. Okay? And you're going to do it by doing things you love. Video games, music, cool slang. Right? Come on. Now we're making language fun and easy for you, and that's what we should do, because you'll learn it faster. All right? And then here's the bad news: Hard work is on its way, so let's move over to the intermediate.
Why some people learn Fluent English fast, and how you can too
 
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Hey awesome English learner! Get the Go Natural English ebook: http://gonaturalenglish.com/ebook WATCH MY LAST VIDEO: http://bit.ly/2gi5q9L SUBSCRIBE TO FLUENCY: http://bit.ly/2fsolgT BUT WAIT! There's more to watch: 5 Secrets to Improve Your English Listening Skills: http://bit.ly/2fpJsxd 3 Big Mistakes in Your English Listening: http://bit.ly/2fsm7y6 Why You Can't Understand Some Native English Speakers: http://bit.ly/2f7KFxM MORE HAPPINESS: FACEBOOK: http://facebook.com/gonaturalenglish TWITTER: http://twitter.com/gonaturaleng IG: http://instagram.com/GoNaturalEnglish BUSINESS INQUIRIES: info@GoNaturalEnglish.com That's it for now! Have an awesome day. Keep smiling! :-D -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- "HOW TO LEARN ENGLISH FLUENTLY, EASILY & FAST BY YOURSELF" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UwJwmrFcwC0 -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Learn English Vocabulary: 12 ways to use body parts as verbs
 
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In this lesson, I will teach you twelve ways that we use body parts as verbs in English. Does that sound strange? Well, maybe it is, but these are verbs you will hear pretty often, so you should learn them. We will look at expressions like "necking", "shoulder a burden", "mouth off", "to eyeball someone", "skinned alive", and more. These expressions are commonly used by native English speakers and are useful in everyday life. When you're finished watching, head over to the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/12-ways-to-use-body-parts-as-verbs/ to test yourself! TRANSCRIPT Hi. James from engVid. I was going to try to... A shoe and a book joke, but I didn't think it would go well. But Mr. E is saying to me: "I gotta hand it to you." Right? "You tried." Yeah, I did try. Unfortunately I failed. Today I want to teach you about body parts as verbs, and how certain parts of our body, from our hands to our mouths, to our heads can be used as verbs and have a meaning. Now, before I go any further, I want to say two things. Thank you to Baz and Tomo. Thanks, guys, you made this lesson possible with some of your suggestions. And if you guys have suggestions for me at all for lessons, please, don't hesitate. Go to engVid, www.engvid.com, and just say, you know: "Can you teach this, this, and this?" or "Could you help us with...?" and you might get your name on the board. Now, I'm going to move on to our lesson, but just to point out because you grammar heads out there will say: "He wrote 'gotta', and that's not a word in English." You're right, this is slang. But I'm saying: "You gotta hand it to me", because I'm using one of these body parts as a verb right there: "hand it", it means have got to. "I have got to hand it to you." But in English, we say: "gotta" because it's faster and simpler. Right? So: "I have got to hand it to you" is very formal, "I gotta hand it to you" is very natural. Keep that in mind. If you're writing, write: "I have got to", but if you're speaking, you could say to a Canadian: "I gotta get going now", and they'll understand you have to go. Cool? All right. Moving on. First things we want to talk about, and I tried to do this in order with your body so you will remember the order. "Head", I have a head. I cannot walk like this, it doesn't make sense. I turn my head in the direction I'm going. So, when somebody says: "Where are you heading?" they're saying: "I see your head is going in this direction. To where are you going?" So: "heading" means direction. "He was heading to his house", that means the direction he was going of his house. "She was heading to the store", she was going in the direction of the store. Number one: "heading". Number two: "eyeball". "To eyeball somebody" is to look at them. Usually used in a negative sense. If someone says to you: "Are you eyeballing me?" It means: "Are you staring at me or looking at me? Because I don't like how you look at me, okay? Stop doing it." Okay? So: "to eyeball someone". Maybe you, you know... Sometimes you've seen women look at other women, and they look them up and down, like: "Look at her." They're eyeballing, because you can see their eyes moving and checking them out. Or guys eyeball each other, like: "Yeah, he thinks he's tough", and they eyeball you. Okay? Number two: "to eyeball". Number three: "neck". I'm not a vampire, I don't... I don't want to bite you and get your blood, but "necking" isn't when two people put their necks together, but "necking" is kissing, but long-time kissing, so it's like you're with your partner: "[Kisses]". "Necking", okay? So that's why I have two lips, because they're kissing and that's why the two people are happy because messing... Messing. [Laughs] Kissing means... "Necking" means long-term kissing or long-time kissing and passionate kissing. Okay? Number four: "mouth off". You can see the mouth is jumping off of a box. Let me finish that box, it doesn't look like a full box, there. So it's jumping off a box. "Mouth off" is to say things, like: "Get out of here. I don't care." It's being rude. Being rude, maybe sometimes using slang towards someone. So, for example, if your dad were to say: "Hey, could you pick up the box?" And you go: "Yo, old man, why don't you pick up the box? You're bigger than me, you should pick up..." You're mouthing off. I would say: "Stop mouthing off. Stop being rude." Okay? Or: "...talking back to me like that". "Mouthing off". "Shoulder", "shoulder a burden", that's just one example, but when you shoulder something, like a responsibility, it means you carry it with you. You carry it with you. So if you're shouldering many responsibilities, maybe you are a student, maybe you're trying to learn English, maybe you have a job, maybe you have a fam-... That's a lot of things to put on your shoulders. Because shoulders are used to carry, so you're carrying a lot of these things on your shoulder. Okay? […]
Learn English With Movies Using This Movie Technique
 
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http://EffortlessEnglishClub.com/show Speak English like a native by learning with movies. Movies can teach you to speak real English naturally. However, to learn with movies you must use the correct technique. Many teachers and students try to learn by simply watching movies and TV shows. Just watching movies is ineffective because you won't understand most of what you hear and you will not learn deeply. The Effortless English movie technique, as described in AJ's book, is a powerful method for completely mastering the vocabulary, phrases, grammar, and pronunciation you hear in movies. Using this method, you study and practice each scene of a movie-- learning it deeply before moving on to the next scene. The goal of the movie technique is to learn deeply, so you never forget what you have learned. In this show, AJ explains the movie technique step by step. Use this technique with all of your favorite movies and TV shows.
Views: 4729736 A.J. Hoge
Improve Your Vocabulary: KNOW, MEET, MEET WITH, or MEET UP?
 
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Do you know the difference between "know" and "meet"? We use these verbs in almost every conversation, so let's make sure you use them correctly! I'll teach you the meaning of "know" and "meet" as well as expressions like "meet with" and "meet up with". Sometimes the difference is between formal and informal English. In other cases, these words and expressions have very different meanings. Try the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/improve-your-vocabulary-know-meet-meet-with-or-meet-up/ to practice what you've learned. TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to teach you about the difference between "know" and "meet". This is a very common mistake I hear many, many students making. Okay. I'm also going to teach you about the difference between "meet", "meet with", or "meet up with". Okay? And this, in case you're wondering, is the past tense of "meet". Okay? So in this video we're going to talk about: "know", "meet", "meet up with", and "meet with", and: What are the differences between those different words? So let's get started. So I have here four sentences. "I knew Chelsea last week." And "knew" is the past of "know". "I met Chelsea last week." "Met" is the past of "meet". "I met with Chelsea last week." and: "I met up with Chelsea last week." Do you know what the difference between these sentences are? Are there any ones that have a mistake in them or all these all good sentences? Okay, so take a moment and think about it. Okay. So, let's first look at the difference between these two: "I knew Chelsea last week." and "I met Chelsea last week." So I have here some pictures. Pictures can really help you remember things, and they can really, you know, help make a point... A stronger point. So, let's get started over here. We have "meet", which is now and the past, which is "met". I have here two people. These people do not know each other. It's the first time that they are talking. Okay? They don't know each other. So what do they say? They say: "Nice to meet you!" We use "meet" when we're meeting somebody for the first time. We use "meet" with strangers. Okay? So these guys, they don't know each other and now they are meeting for the first time. Okay, so these two, we could say: "They met last week." Meaning: The first time they shook hands: "Hi. Nice to meet you." was last week. Now, compare this to "know" or "knew", which again, is the past tense. We have here two friends. Okay? We can call them David and Ken. They're friends forever. Okay? They've been friends for a very long time. In this case they know each other. They have history. It's not they're meeting for the first time. No. They met a long time ago. So if there's history between two people, they know each other. If there is no history between two people and, you know, it's their first time shaking hands, saying: "Nice to meet you", they meet each other. Okay? So this one we would never say... This is a mistake I hear a lot. A lot of people say: "Oh. It's nice to know you." We don't say that. Okay? Because "know" means you met the person a long time ago and you've... You know, you have a history together. For this, this is the first time, we would use "meet" not "know". Okay? So another thing I wanted to say on this is a lot of the times you want to... You know, you want to talk about how long has somebody been friends with somebody or how long has somebody had this person for their teacher. So the... What we usually use is the present perfect, so we often say how long we've known someone. Okay? So "known" is the past participle of "know". So what you can say if somebody says: -"Oh. How long have you known your husband for?" -"I've known my husband for 10 years." -"How long has Dave known Ken for?" -"Dave has known Ken for five years." Okay? So, again, this is asking about: How long is your history? How long have you known each other for? Again, this is key English. It comes up a lot in conversation. When you meet somebody, you know, and there's like a couple, you often say: "Oh. How long have you known Bob for? How long have you known Jennifer for?" Okay? So now let's look at some of the differences with "met", or, sorry. "Meet", "meet with", and "meet up with". Okay, so quick question to you. We've just gone over the difference between "know" and "met". For these two: "I knew Chelsea last week.", "I met Chelsea last week." which one do you think is correct? Well, if you said number two: "I met Chelsea last week." that's right. Oh, okay. "I met Chelsea last week." This one is correct, because usually you know somebody for a long time and we usually don't use "knew" because it makes it sound like the person has died or that you don't know them anymore. So we usually use "know" or we use "have known".
How to learn English if you are shy
 
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Are you shy? Do you feel uncomfortable or embarrassed when speaking English? Are you envious when your classmates, coworkers, or friends seem so comfortable speaking English to each other or in front of groups? In this video, I will give you advice to overcome your shyness. If you are shy, don't be discouraged, because you can learn English just as well as talkative, social people, but you need to use different strategies. Today, I will share my tips and tricks with you to help you break out of your shell! Did you understand the video? Take the quiz to find out: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-learn-english-if-you-are-shy/ TRANSCRIPT Hi there. My name is Emma, and in today's video I am going to help you become a better speaker, especially if you are shy. Okay? So, a lot of people when they learn new languages, they're very embarrassed and they're too shy to speak. This video will help you with good tips and strategies on how to become more confident in your speaking. So let's get started. Okay, so the first thing I like to tell shy people, so people who are afraid to speak, is: You need to find your strengths. You need to ask yourself: "What am I good at?" Because a lot of the times, shy people, they think: "Oh my goodness, I'm not good at speaking, I'm terrible at English, I'll never learn this language", and they feel really sad. But that's not usually true. Usually shy people are good at many different things, they just don't realize it. So remember: English is not only speaking. Speaking is part of it, but there are other skills, too. Maybe you're a great listener. Okay? Maybe you're good at grammar. Maybe you're not good at all grammar, but you're amazing at the present perfect or the simple past. You know, maybe you're good at reading or writing. So it's good to recognize what you're good at so you don't feel so sad when you're learning English, because you might be good at a lot of different things. So, you can always write down on a piece of paper: "I am able to", you know, listen very well, or: "I am able to do well on my grammar test." Okay? So think about: What are your strengths? My next tip is probably one of the most important tips. When you're trying to learn a language, especially when you're shy, it's good to make goals and to write them down. Okay? So what do I mean by goals? Well, for example, I have three goals here and I'm going to talk about each of them. Somebody's goal might be: "I will be a better speaker." Or they might say: "I will say two things in class today." Or: "I will ask two people: 'How is your day going?'" So these are all goals, but these goals are not all great goals. What do I mean by that? Well, this first goal: "I will be a better speaker", you will not know if you've become a better speaker or not. This goal, it's too big so I would not use this goal. Okay? When you make a goal it's good to make something where you have a number in it, and you can tell very easily: Did you do it or didn't you do it? So, for example: "I will say two things in class today", this is a great goal because you know: "Okay, I said two things in class, I met my goal for the day." This will really help you with speaking, especially if you're shy. Maybe you're too shy even to say two things in class, so maybe you can say one thing in class or maybe for the first class you can just listen and try for the next class to say one thing. Okay? Another example of a great goal is: "I will ask two", and again, this can be any number. "I will ask two people: 'How is your day going today?'" So just by making goals, it can really encourage you to speak and practice your English, and you will improve this way because it is important to speak as much as you can. This way, you know, it's not too difficult, it's something you can do. The other key point here is: Write down your goals. I think it's great to have a journal or a diary where you write down your daily goal, and then at the end of the week you can check it off and see: Did I meet this goal? Hopefully you did, and that way you can actually monitor your English progress. So now let's look at some more tips. Okay, so my next tip is very important, too: Don't compare yourself to extroverts. So, what is an extrovert? It's the opposite of a shy person. So, an extrovert is somebody who everybody pays attention to because they love to talk, they're great in social situations, they're usually with friends or out with people. So, an extrovert is somebody who's not really shy. So, what a lot of shy people do is they compare themselves. They see the extrovert, and they think: "Wow, I wish I was just like that person. That person's speaking is so good. Why can't I speak like that?" It's very common to compare yourself, but it's not a good idea, because number one, it's possible that person is making a lot of mistakes.
REMEMBER ANYTHING with the Memory Palace Method
 
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There is a lot of memorization that goes into learning a new skill, and learning English is no exception. In this lesson, I will teach you a useful strategy that will help you memorize and remember almost anything. It's called the "memory palace", and you can start using it today. I will show you the three keys to making the memory palace work for you. You will learn how to make associations to help your brain remember not only words, but also their specific order. The memory palace will help you remember all sorts of material in any subject. Make the memory palace a regular part of your study routine, and see how much your memory improves. I will give you exercises to challenge your memory in the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/remember-anything-with-the-memory-palace-method/ WATCH NEXT: 1. How to use MIND MAPS to REMEMBER everything you read: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k1rwf370z5E&list=PL1MxVBsQo85qbTHKgEgpCh7ytX9uyIsYY&index=39 2. How to use your dictionary to improve your VOCABULARY: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RyxtYRkzqcg&t=0s&list=PL1MxVBsQo85qbTHKgEgpCh7ytX9uyIsYY&index=1 TRANSCRIPT Silicon Valley, security of the internet, aerospace, holter, capital inflation, ambitious... Oh, how am I going to remember all this vocabulary? This is so much to... I have an idea. Hold on a second. Excuse me, guys, I have to get a book. Where did I put...? Ah, there it is. A long time ago-hey, E, we're going to get to you in a second-I had a trouble remembering vocabulary for something I was studying, and it was so difficult, and I thought: "I know, my favourite hero is, like, Sherlock Holmes, and he has what's called a memory palace, and I think that's why E did this. He said: "I'm a king. Where is my palace?" Today we're going to work on a memory palace. For you it might be more, like, a memory house or a memory room, but as your memory gets better and better, we can make it from a room to a house to a palace. A palace is a house where a king lives or a queen lives, and is huge with many, many rooms and you can do many, many things. And after I show you this method, you will figure out that you might want to start with just a room, but from there you can go from a room to a house to a workspace, like your business place or workplace, to a palace because as long as you can remember the room, you can remember vocabulary. And today we're going to have some fun because I'm going to do... Well, we're going to go step by step and do this together. I'm going to ask you to do a couple of things, you'll do them and you're going to find that your memory has increased incredibly. And we can do it for many, many things. So you guys ready? I'll take a look here. Let's get started. What do you need? Okay, you just need to right now sit down. I'm going to ask you to focus in a second or two, and then you just need to laugh. So if something's funny, laugh, have fun with it, and then we're going to see how much vocabulary you have. So the first thing I'm going to do is give you eight words. Number one: "bacon". Number two: "ball". Number three: "banana". Number four: "fish". Number five: "monkey". Number six: "Mr. E". All right, Mr. E. Number seven: "rat". And number eight: "dog". Got it? Cool. Now, what I want you to do is tell me all eight of those words. I'm waiting. I'm listening. Go. Go for it. In order. In order. Did you get all of the words? If so, good for you, you have a remarkable memory. You don't need me, turn off the video, go somewhere else. No, you better stay, because still can help you with more words than this. I'm just showing you eight because we have a limited time. Now, some people if they've done that exercise before, they'll go: "Oh, I recognize this", but don't worry about it. So, if you didn't do well, maybe you got four words or five words, but they weren't in order, you got them all over... Let me give you the words again, but this time I'm going to ask you to join me and do something, and I bet you can know all the words and you can even tell me the words out of order. Okay? So, let's do this again. But this time... And here's the trick: You have to really put the idea in your head when I give it to you. Okay? You can't just go: "Okay, okay." You have to actually see it. Okay? And when I say laugh, I mean if it's funny make it crazy as heck, make it crazy, crazy, crazy, crazy in your head. All right? So let's do the first one. I want you to imagine you're coming to a door. Okay? You come to a door, you open the door, and just before you open the door you see a piece of bacon, and the bacon's running from the bottom of the door, going: "Oh my god! Help me! Help me!" It's running out the door as fast as it can. It goes in fast motion, it runs out the door, and you're like: "Whoa! Look at that bacon run out the door. […]
How to use Mind Maps to understand and remember what you read!
 
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Do you have a hard time remembering what you read? Do you need to read things many times before you understand? Reading books can be discouraging because of the large amount of information on each page. To help you make sense of all that information, I will show you how to create a mind map. A mind map is a graphic that shows categories containing quick reference points from your book. By taking short notes and organizing them in a specific way, you will have all the information you need to quickly and easily remember the important points of a book. Just the process of thinking about and creating this mind map will help your brain to understand and remember the material. Try it! It really works and it is free. Mind maps are especially useful when it's time to write an assignment or study for an exam! Watch the video to learn how to create your own mind map. Watch my first mind map lesson: https://www.engvid.com/mind-maps-how-to-learn-vocabulary/ Take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-use-mind-maps-to-understand-and-remember-what-you-read/ TRANSCRIPT How to submit. We want to hear from all artists and makers who have a passion for creating. That's cool. Hi. James from engVid. You notice? I was reading. It's not a special skill. Most of us learn it, but the problem is when you go to another language it's difficult sometimes to understand what's on the paper and be able to use that. So today's lesson is about mind maps. Mind maps? Yeah. Wait a second, mind maps and reading. I did a general lesson earlier on. Somewhere in the link you can look down and you can find it, go back, you can watch it. But in that lesson I didn't give any specific examples on mind maps. I'm doing this particular lesson to address that. So, if you're here going: "Yeah, I want to learn about mind maps and reading", this is your lesson. Hold on two seconds. We're going to discuss what the benefits are, what the benefits of reading are, then I'm going to give you a very detailed mind map explaining what parts you should do for what, and that'll help you with reading. Are you ready? Let's go to the board. All right, E, what's up? "It's all Greek to me." Omega, it's not the best symbol, you probably can't see it, but Greek. In English we say when something's Greek to me, it means we don't understand it. A lot of times you'll get a big contract when, you know, you have your cellphone and there's a bill and it's: "Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah", and you're like: "I don't understand it. It's all Greek." I know you understand all of the words, it's just they're put together in such a way it's difficult, and that doesn't matter if you're reading your own language or another language. But there are a lot of benefits when you're learning another language that reading gives you. And a lot of people want to talk and listen, but reading has some power. And let's address that now. Okay? So mind maps are reading comprehension. Don't worry if you haven't seen the mind map, it's coming up in a second or two. But the first thing I want to talk to you about is reading helps you understand the way that the language is put together. Most of you will come and... You come to engVid to learn vocabulary and grammar, but that doesn't help you with syntax, that doesn't help you with putting the words together in a logical way. Reading does that because... Well, let's face facts, when you're reading someone is actually speaking to you but they're not in front of you. So the problem is if they're not very clear and they don't use the language well, you won't really understand them. Right? So reading teaches you how to... The language is put together, where the verbs go, and when's a better place to use the verb or a noun, and how you can show expressions. Okay? Reading also teaches you how to speak by showing you the way that the language is used by the native speakers. Huh? Well, if it's a fiction book they actually say: "-'Johnny, are you coming?' -'Yes.' Dah, dah, dah, dah", and they show you how we use the language. So not only do you understand how to put the language together by looking at it and going: "Ah, comma here, period here", but then they say: "Hey, this is how we speak." So if you follow this you can actually use that kind of method or sys-... Not system. You can follow those words and actually speak like we do. All right?
Learn English Vocabulary: Compound Adjectives to describe people
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Do you know what a 'compound adjective' is? In today's lesson, I will teach you some very common compound adjectives to describe people. Native speakers use these expressions a lot in everyday conversation. Knowing these compound adjectives will help you understand spoken English, and will help you to speak English more fluently. Make sure you understood the lesson by taking the quiz. Good luck! http://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-compound-adjectives/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, there. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you some new words. These words are all compound adjectives. So what is a compound adjective? Well, a compound adjective is when you have two different words together with a hyphen. English is full of compound adjectives. I'm going to teach you maybe eight compound adjectives that all have to do with people's personalities. So if you're describing a friend, a roommate, your family, these are the types of words you can use. So let's get started The first word I want to teach you is "open-minded", okay? "Open-minded". Students have a lot of trouble with the pronunciation of this word. Many students say, "I have" or "I am open-mind"; "I am open-mind." No. You need "open-minded", -ED. Students always forget the "-ED" at the end. So be aware. Be careful. What does it mean to be "open-minded"? If you are open-minded, it means you like to try new things. When something happens, when you have an opportunity to try something new, you will do it. You're a "yes person". If somebody says, "Do you want to eat a spider?" Well, this might be extreme. But in some cultures, they eat spiders. They might ask you, "Do you want to eat a spider?" If you're open-minded, you'll say, "Sure. Yeah. Let's try it." You know, that's a little extreme. There are other cases of being open-minded. Here's another example. "I try to eat the local food because I'm open-minded." Okay? So you like to try new things. You are open-minded. Maybe you have never been outside of your country. If you go to a new country, maybe you'll notice there are differences in the culture. If these differences aren't upsetting to you, if you're willing to meet new people, try new things, learn new ways of living, you are "open-minded". The opposite of "open-minded" -- just like you open a door -- "closed", "closed-minded". So be careful with the pronunciation of this. "Closed-minded." So it's not close-ed-minded". "Closed-minded." If you are "closed-minded", you don't like to try new things. Trying new things is very uncomfortable for you. So for example -- or thinking in new ways. You don't want to change the way you live. You don't want to think in new ways. You're very traditional, and you don't like change. You are "closed-minded". "My mother won't try anything new. She is closed-minded." Okay? So if somebody doesn't want to change, is very uncomfortable with other cultures, other ideas, they are "closed-minded". Another "minded" compound adjective, "absent-minded". "Absent" -- you might have heard this word before. If you are not in class, you are "absent"; the teacher will mark you absent. Okay? So when you're absent, you're not there. "Absent-minded" is when your brain is not there. What does this mean? Well, it means you are thinking about something different, so you don't see what's happening. Here's an example to help you understand. I have a friend. My friend, her name is Lara. She is very absent-minded. She's always thinking about boys. Always thinking about her boyfriend, boy troubles. So because of that, sometimes, she forgets to do her homework. She's too busy thinking about one thing. She doesn't realize what's happening around her. She is "absent-minded". So, "Lara is absent-minded. She forgot to do her homework." So you're not thinking about something. You're absent-minded. Your mind is elsewhere. Another expression, very common expression, "laid-back". "Laid-back." What does it mean to be "laid-back"? Well, this is a very positive expression. It's a good expression. And it means you're a very relaxed person; you don't get angry; you don't get annoyed; you're very calm, relaxed, you go with the flow. You're a very happy, laid-back person. For example, I told you my friend Lara, she's very absent-minded. She's always forgetting to do her homework because she thinks too much about boys. Well, her teacher is a very laid-back teacher. When she doesn't do her homework, her teacher does not get angry. He does not yell at her and say, "Lara, why didn't you do your homework?" No. He's laid-back. He says, "Oh, it's okay. That's fine. It's okay that you didn't do your homework." He doesn't the get angry. He is laid-back. So let's look at some more compound adjectives.
"I seen it" and other stupid mistakes
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ I'm sure "you seen" it before, but that doesn't make it right. This lesson will help you understand and correct three very common grammar mistakes that even many native English speakers make every day. Test your understanding of this lesson with the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/i-seen-it-and-other-stupid-mistakes/
Learn English: 3 easy ways to get better at speaking English
 
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There are easy ways to learn English, and here are 3 methods NOT taught in language schools or textbooks. These methods are fun, fast, and easy to learn! You will learn how to make studying English easier, and learn how to spend less time studying. Take this lesson and learn the secrets to getting better in English right now. "The Prosperity Plan." It's empty. Why? Well, hi. James, from EngVid. I have a book, and it says "Prosperity Plan". I know you're here to learn English. This is a book full of secrets on how to make millions of dollars. Empty. That's because when people tell you there's a secret, there's not really a secret; there's a method behind something, and you may not know it, so to you it's a secret, but you know, just like that book, there are no secrets. The only one is hard work. Let's look at the three methods I have for you today in order to learn English, okay? Call them the "Secrets you need to know" because most people don't know them because the funny thing is, although they're not secret -- I said it again -- they're not methods that are usually taught in ESL books. The Kaizen Method, the Process Method, and the Writing Method are actually books I read on something completely different. But what I found was they were very, very handy for learning English. Personally, I'm trying to learn Spanish, and when I apply these different methods, I found my learning going faster and faster, and I actually enjoyed it. So I called them "secret" for you because I'm quite sure that your teachers haven't sat down and gone, "Today, we're going to learn the Kaizen Method of English. Then, we'll do the Process Method, and then we'll do the Writing Method." No. Because they're actually three different books, all right? So I'm just going to give you a part of each book, and if I come across to the end, I'll give you another lesson on it, all right? But these are three things I liked out of these books. All right. Let's start from the first one, the Process Method. I know -- and it's in red, and I start here why? Most of the times people are learning a language, they want to -- and this is what the Process Method is about. People start with "product", "product". What is a "product"? A "product" is something you can touch or hold. This marker is a product. But this isn't how the marker started. I'm sorry. Okay, the marker started a little differently. I mean, that's an alcohol base that I'm sniffing. When I go [inhales], there's liquid in here. This is plastic -- came from oil. So why I'm telling you all these things -- you're going, "Why are you telling me?" Well, things start in a certain way, but they end up like this. In fact, you can think of the Process Method versus product as being a tree and being a seed. And a seed, you know, little thing, you put it in the ground, and it grows into a tree. Well, when you have a seed, the seed has no idea that it's going to be a tree and a big tree -- how long it will take. But humans are funny. They want to start a language, and they think right away, "I'm going to learn English." And then, they sit down; they open the book; they open the book; "I'm going to learn English. I'm learning English. I'm learning English." And then they get upset one hour later. "I don't know any English. I don't speak English." Well, it's like being a human. You start as a baby, you grow to an adult. When we talk about the Process Method, what you want to do is don't think about you want to speak English. Yes, I know. That's why you're watching this video and why you're studying. Think more about what you're doing while you're studying English. And this is called the "process". Go into the step. Concentrate on what you're doing. You'll find a couple of things happen: Sometimes you'll say English is hard or it's boring. If you do this method, you'll actually stop finding it hard or boring, and you'll enjoy it because you'll be working on something specific, mastering that, and then you're going to start noticing that the final product -- English -- is coming to you. And it will come faster than you think. Why? Well, if you're thinking, "I don't understand this English", you're focusing, really, on you don't understand English or you don't know English. You're not focusing on what you're doing. If you take a breath [inhales] and go [exhales], "Okay. I'm just watching this video of this crazy guy who speaks very quickly in English, and just now, he told me to take a breath. Oh, okay. I understand." And you're ahead. That's the Process Method. Take time to actually go back -- when you're thinking about it's hard; it's difficult or boring -- and say to yourself, "What am I doing now?" And then look at that. Each time you do that, you get further in the process and you will end up with a product before you know it. Okay? Sounds simple, but try it. You can even do this on a date. That's another story.
Polite English: How to ask people to repeat themselves
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Do you often not understand people or fail to hear what they are saying? Native English speakers often speak unclearly or too fast, making it difficult to understand their words. In this lesson, I will teach you some polite ways of asking people to repeat what they said. You will learn expressions such as,"pardon", "I didn't quite hear you", "Could you speak more slowly, please?" and more. Never miss a word again and become an even better English speaker with this useful lesson. And if you need me to repeat anything, just replay the video! http://www.engvid.com/polite-english-how-to-ask-people-to-repeat-themselves/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. This is Gill at www.engvid.com, and today we're going to have a lesson about what to do if someone says something to you and you can't hear them properly, or it's not very clear what they say, and you need to ask them to repeat what it was they said. And this could happen anywhere, anywhere in the world, but especially if you're in maybe a big city where there are people of many different nationalities; cities like London, Toronto, New York, anywhere really in the world. So people with different accents, either because they're from other countries and English is not their first language, or even within one country, like within the UK, we have many different accents from different parts of the country, from different cities, from Scotland, Wales, Ireland. There are all different accents. And if someone has a strong accent, it's more difficult to understand them. So this lesson is about asking people to say again what they said. I have to do it even if someone says something in English, which is my first language, I sometimes have to ask people to say something again. So it happens to everybody. Okay, so let's have a look at some of the words you can use to deal with this situation. All right? So, a very useful single word is just to say: "Sorry?" with a sort of rising in the voice. Question: "Sorry? Sorry?" And also, I've put body language at the bottom here, but it's quite important. You can sort of go like this, and say: "Sorry?" and lean towards them a little bit with your hand by your ear. So especially if they also are not English... If their first language is not English, they will understand from this that you didn't understand what they said. So a little bit of body language helps as well. So: "Sorry?" is very useful and polite, because we need it to be polite as well. So, polite. So: "Sorry?" is a polite way of asking someone to repeat. At one time, there was also the word: "Pardon?" which is a little bit old fashioned now. So, to say: "Pardon?" it's a little... It used to be very polite, and children were taught to say: "Pardon?" but now it's a little bit old fashioned, and people might laugh at you if you use: "Pardon?" So, see what other people say to you, and then you can follow what they say, but "Pardon?" is a little bit old now. Okay, now things not to say which are not polite. You don't just say: "What?" because that is rather rude. So, don't say: "What? What?" Very rude, especially with a loud voice and making a funny face. "What?" Not very nice at all, so don't say: "What?" And don't say things like: "Eh? Eh?" A lot of English people might say: "Eh?" but that's not polite either. So... Or: "Uh?" that's not polite either, just to say: "Uh? Uh?" No. Okay, so the polite way, really, as one word is just to say: "Sorry?" and then the person will probably understand you need them to say it again. But there are longer sentences you can use as well, in addition to: "Sorry?" just to give you a wider range of options. And the three main things about what... The way we all speak is clarity: what we say should be clear. I hope I'm being clear in this lesson. So, that's the adjective "clear", and the noun is "clarity". Clarity of speech. Okay? So it must be clear. The pace or the speed. If people speak very quickly, it's difficult to follow what they're saying; to understand what they're saying. So the pace should be fairly slow and regular. Okay. And the volume, how loud or quiet somebody is. If someone speaks very quietly... You probably can't hear me at the moment. So some people are a bit shy, and they don't speak very loud, loudly. So the volume, how loud people are is important. So sometimes you need to ask somebody to speak more loudly, so we have different sentences for these.
How to improve your English conversation skills
 
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How to start conversations with native speakers and improve your ability to speak English fluently. http://www.engvid.com/
Basic English vocabulary for restaurants
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Eating in a restaurant can be a fun thing to do with friends, but if you are just learning English all the new words can be confusing. Watch and learn what an "appetizer" is and how to change your "order", and before you know it you will be "fine dining" with the best of them. Take the quiz for this lesson here: http://www.engvid.com/basic-english-vocabulary-restaurants/ TRANSCRIPT Party of two, your table is ready, party of two. Okay, and these are your drinks, sir. There you go. Enjoy your meal. Bon appétit! Hi. James, from EngVid. When I'm not making videos, I need to make money, and this lesson, actually, is about restaurants. I used to be a waiter when I was younger, so I've been in many a restaurant, and I know it might be difficult for you when you -- I mean, you're coming to a new country. I'll slow it down for you because this is basic. You're coming to a new country, and you want to enjoy something. You want to have a meal out of your house. You know -- meal, dinner, or lunch or breakfast. And you go to the restaurant and then somebody walks up to you with, "party of", "table of", "And what would you like for appetizers?" "Would you like an app?" "Would you like this?" "Well, how about your main?" "What about this?" No! Please, don't. So let's slow it down. Let's make it basic, so when you enter a restaurant, you can right away know what they're talking about. Now, there're other things -- you know, we don't have everything in here. There are two other videos on restaurants that you can go watch on EngVid, but this is basic. But even if you think, "Oh, I know all this stuff. I'm very good", you might learn a thing or two. Okay? So come watch. So let's start off first. The worm has a drink. One of the first things they're going to come up to you depending -- and see, I don't know if you know this. There's "fine dining", "casual dining", and "fast food". First thing you should know, so where are you going? "Fast food" is like McDonald's, Taco Bell -- [coughs] that's not food -- Taco Bell, Subway -- most of this won't apply, okay? But some of these words, like -- well, we'll get there -- will apply, and I'll let you know. "Casual dining" is like Chili's or Montana's. I mean these are restaurants in the United States and Canada, so don't worry, but it's all similar. It means you can wear something like I'm wearing: jeans -- there you go. I'm getting old. Can't lift that leg up -- or a T-shirt, and it's okay. No one's going to complain, okay? And you can sit down. Not like McDonald's. You can sit down with a knife and fork, and you can eat your dinner. Or -- then you have "fine dining". "Fine dining" is when the people wear what we call "penguin suits". They have a tie and a shirt, and they walk up, and they serve on tables. Okay? But you need a reservation, and it's mucho dinero mis amigos, mucho, mucho dinero. For the rest of you, it's lots of money. "Fine dining" -- "fine" means "expensive", and you usually require a reservation to get a table. So let's just go with casual, because casual is where most can go. Even if you're in a foreign country and there are people who serve tourists, they're going to go mostly to casual, not necessarily fine dining, so I'm sticking with casual, all right? So casual -- McDonald's we know you just walk in. And here's something -- and McDonald people you can thank me. Next time you go, don't watch them and say, "Give me Big Mac. Give me French fries. And that I want." Try to say, "may I" or "can I have". People who work in the service industry -- which is what the restaurant industry is, where they serve you -- they want a little politeness, so try "can I have" and "may I have". You'll be surprised at how much better they serve you or treat you. Now let's go to the board with the worm, who is providing drinks. One of the first things you come in and you come to a restaurant, they might say to you, "party of" or "table for". And you're going to say, "What?" Well, "party of" -- I know you're not like, "Fiesta time, baby! Yeah, we're going to party, going to be drinking" -- no. What they mean is you are a group of people, and how many are in the group. So "party of two" or "party of four" means there are two -- you can say, "There are two in my party" or four. "There are two of us", or "there are four of us", or ten, okay? Then it's a "partay". It's not a "party"; it's a "partay". Now, "table of" means the same thing, or "table for", "table for". And they mean, for -- I did a video where I talked about "for" means "receive". Go look at it. "For" means "to receive", so "table for four people", so "table for four", "table for five" -- this is four. How many people? That's easy. And that's when they're sitting in the front. That's the first thing they will ask you. Then they will bring you to your table. And they're going to give you something called a "menu".
Listening to And Improve English While Sleeping - Listening Exercise Part 1
 
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English Listening Practice Level 1 (115 Topics) https://goo.gl/MZ64jY English Listening Practice Level 2 (105 Topics) https://goo.gl/eVpVUu English Listening Practice Level 3 (100 Topics) https://goo.gl/Tv3J8p English Listening Practice Level 4 (100 Topics) https://goo.gl/r8T7cE Learn English Through Story https://goo.gl/j1mtBh Subscrible to receive free new lesson https://goo.gl/zfrKn9
Views: 908618 Learn English With Calle
10 "TIP" Expressions in English
 
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Learn 10 common English expressions that use the word "tip". You can start using these expressions in your English conversations immediately. We'll go over the different meanings of "tip", and I'll teach you some common collocations with this word. By the end of this English lesson, you will improve your vocabulary, learn useful expressions, and understand how the expressions are most commonly used. I'll teach you the meaning of "tip of the iceberg", "generous tipper", "tip of my tongue", and many more! TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/10-tip-expressions-in-english/ TRANSCRIPT Doo-doo-doo-doo-doo. What's the name of that director? It's just on the tip of my... Oh. Hi. James from engVid. Today I want to teach you about a word "tip". We use this word a lot in English, and I am going to teach you what it means, some collocations-and collocations are words that are found together generally, you know, a lot-and a few idioms. If you're ready, we'll go to the board, visit Mr. E and start our lesson. Let's go. So, E has "tip", he's pointing to his tongue and he's pointing to these icebergs, and he's pointing to the tip. So I've got an idea that "tip" has something to do with the edge or the pointed part of something. Hmm? Well, here's our word: "tip". For pronunciation, you go: "t-ip". Right? "ip", "tip", like: "dip" or "sip". So that's pronunciation. I think it's very important that you not only know what the word means, but how to say it or how to recognize it when you hear it. So that's our lesson for the day. The two basic meanings of "tip" are: A) a gift of money for service. Not everywhere in the world this happens, but in North America and in England, if you go to a restaurant, when you... Oh, sorry. Not England. [Laughs] In North America, which is Canada, the United States, not including Mexico, but in these two countries after you finish a meal you are kind of obligated to leave a little extra money if the service is good. So if you liked the waiter or waitress, they do a good service, you leave money and it's called a tip. It's a gift for good service, like: "Thank you. I really appreciate it. Here you go." We also do this for taxis. All right? Now, the pointed end of something... Here's my tongue and the tip, the tip of my tongue. That's the tip of my tongue, ah. But also with this marker, that's the tip of the marker. It's pointed and it's the very end. And that should help you understand why E was pointing to the tip of the iceberg which is pointed and the tip of his tongue. With these two ideas we're going to now move into how we can use "tip" like a native speaker, and some idioms as well. Okay? To make English fun and understandable. The first one we talked about, "tip" at a restaurant. Money. But do you know "tip" is also for information? Remember we said it's the tip or the pointed end? Well, it's the beginning of something. When someone gives you a tip, they might come to you close and go: "Hey. I've got a hot tip." So, "tip" here could also be hot, and that means like it's special information, important information. Something they want to tell you that's going to benefit you. "Hey, I got a hot tip about a car selling for a really cheap price and it's in really good condition." It's special and it's for you. It's pointed to you. All right? This one's a funny one. If you... [Laughs] Another meaning for "tip" is to make something... If it tips it will fall over. So it means on an angle to fall. Right? It tipped over it went: "Wuh, boom". It tipped. "Tip" means to fall over, but in North America there's a little habit people have of cow tipping. I don't suggest that you do it, it's not funny because the poor cows, they sleep standing up. And some people will go to farms and they will push the cow, and the cow will fall over, wake up. "Moo. Who mooved me?" It's not nice. Don't do it. All right? That's number three. So, "tip" here also means to make fall over. So these are three basic pieces of information about "tip". One is tip given for service; two is for information that you give to someone, especially a hot tip; and three if something's tipping over like a book or a glass, it's going to fall. All right? And we did talk about the pointed end of something, and that's where we lead to here. "Tip of the iceberg". See how big icebergs are? Okay? Well, they're very tall. If you look here you see this part here, yeah? Well, that's a smaller part of something larger. So if someone tells you something, like: "And then he did that, and that's just the tip of the iceberg", that means that small part is nothing compared to how much more is coming. There's an enormous or a great amount of information, or other things about to happen. Right? So: "We went to the party, and we got shrimp to eat. But that was the tip of the iceberg. Then there was lobster, there was a pasta dish. It just went on and on." And you're like: "Wow! That's a lot!"
Listening Skills | Why You Don’t Understand Movies, TV Shows, & Native English Speakers
 
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FREE DOWNLOAD A Simple Guide To Practicing English With Native Speakers https://englishfulltime.com/free-guide ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••­­­••••••••••• Hey! Want to improve your English faster and easier than ever? Check out our private membership program today! 😎👉🏼 https://members.englishfulltime.com/p/english-24-7 ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••­­­••••••••••• ABOUT THIS VIDEO The #1 question people ask me is, "Stefanie, I understand everything you say! So why don't I understand movies, TV shows and other native speakers in English?" In this video I attempt to answer that question. Here are some of the reasons... Lots of native English speakers mumble, they don't project their voice, and they use an outrageous amount of idioms. All of this makes it more difficult for you to understand them. I have good speaking habits and I speak to be understood. This is probably why you understand me so well. Also, in case you are wondering.... no, I don't slow down or change the way I speak so that you can understand me better. This really is the way that I talk. However, in my YouTube videos, I am presenting information... and anytime we do a presentation, we automatically speak a little more clearly. Next... I'm from California, so I speak with an English accent that you are probably very familiar with-- especially if you watch lots of TV shows and movies with American actors. Remember, people speak English differently all over the world. So, you may understand me but struggle to understand an Irish news reporter. That's normal. (By the way, when I went to Ireland in 2015, I barely understood people there! There accent and vocabulary was so different from mine.) At the end of the day, improving your listening skills is like anything else... it takes time, effort, study, and practice. You need to listen to LOTS of English for many hours, day after day, year after year. That's what it takes to finally understand movies, TV shows, and native English speakers easily. Most English learners that struggle with this simply haven't been exposed to English long enough. Anyhow, there's a there's a lot more I could say about this... so I might have to make another video :) Please let us know your thoughts in the comments. ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••­­­••••••••••• HANG OUT WITH ME HERE 🙋🏼‍♀️ → Website: https://www.englishfulltime.com/ → Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stefanietheenglishcoach/ → Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theenglishcoach/ → Blog: https://www.englishfulltime.com/blog/ → Business Inquiries: stefanie@englishfulltime.com ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••­­­••••••••••• SOME OF MY FAVORITE THINGS 🤗 The Book That Changed My Life: http://amzn.to/2GjHgGx Best Headphones Ever (super expensive, but 100% worth it!): http://amzn.to/2GjIMZa Awesome Travel-Sized Mic: http://amzn.to/2FCZ4eN My Favorite Backpacking Pack (super durable, I love it!): http://amzn.to/2FOasrs Every Woman Needs This: http://amzn.to/2FtaeXn If you travel with electronics, you need this: http://amzn.to/2Fw0Geh Luggage Organizers (so simple, yet so useful!): http://amzn.to/2Fw4oEJ Best Webcam (still PERFECT after 5+ years!): http://amzn.to/2HsF5Qv Improve Your Writing & Master Punctuation (not for beginners): http://amzn.to/2tBUn3i Learn The Secrets Of Good Writing (not for beginners): http://amzn.to/2Fwp4MR (NOTE: These are affiliate links) ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••­­­••••••••••• FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQ's) 🌎 Where are you from? -California 🗣 Do you speak another language? -Yes, I learned Spanish and speak fluently. ✈️ What countries have you traveled to? -Mexico, Argentina, Ireland, UK, Denmark, Switzerland, Italy 🇦🇷 Have you ever lived abroad? -Yes, I have lived in Argentina since January 2013 🤷🏼‍♀️ You speak too fast. Can you slow down? -No. I work with advanced English learners, and they don't need or want me to slow down. You can slow down my videos with this chrome extension: http://bit.ly/2twblvb 🤓 I want to improve my English. Can you help me? -Sure. Sign up on my website to learn more about my online courses, classes, and offers. Here is the link: https://www.englishfulltime.com
Views: 123525 The English Coach
Learn English - Travel Vocabulary
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Learn important, basic words you will need when you travel. Knowing a little English vocabulary can help a lot when you are travelling. Whever you are going in the world, you can almost always find someone who speaks some English. I'll teach you how a "tourist attraction" is different from a "tourist trap". What about "sight seeing"? Do you know what an "itinerary" is? Do you have your travel documents? Get ready for your English to take flight! http://www.engvid.com/travel-vocabulary/ Hi. James, from EngVid. I was just about to plan my vacation. I'm going to take a long flight to Europe. I'm trying to remember luggage and baggage things, you know? It's kind of hard to do. But this is a lesson for you if you've been working a lot, you need some time off. Now, there's a video I would like you to go check out. That's on time off. It goes with this one. You might want to go away somewhere and not just stay home, right? So this video is for you. This is basic vocabulary on vacation. When you leave and maybe you go to an English speaking country and you want to practice your English, this stuff will be good for you to enjoy your time there, also to make it easy for you when you arrive. Are you ready? Let's go to the board. Mr. E, Mr. E! It's a mystery where he is. It's no mystery. And you thought I forgot. Mr. E has been on vacation with me, and he's enjoying this particular attraction. So let's go to the board. Now, if you're going to go on vacation, one of the first things you will have to do if you're leaving your country is you're going to need some travel documents. What are those? Documents. A "document" is a paper or something with information that tells you something is okay or outlines it for you. For example, your passport is a document given by the government with your picture on it that says you are a citizen of this country, and you are legal. You are a good person. Okay? Now, when you're leaving for a flight, or you want to go to another country, you're going to need travel documents first. Trust me; show up at the airport and go, "I leave now. I go to Canada." They will go, "And the car is that way. Go home, crazy man. Okay?" So we need travel documents. So what are "travel documents"? Well, "travel documents" would be your passport, government identification, usually needed at most places the travel. Inside of a country, not necessary for most places. But leaving the country, you have to have it. Okay? So if you're in the European Union, no problem. If you're in Canada and the United States, you don't need one. But as soon as you leave these countries, you need a passport. What's another thing you need? Well, you need what's called a "boarding pass". If you play soccer, you kick the ball; the other guy, he catches it; you "pass" right? The ball goes from one player to another. A "boarding pass" is what allows you to go from one country to another country. You show the person on the airplane this piece of paper with your passport, and they say, "You know what? You can come on the plane and fly, like the pass." Kick, catch, other country. Cool? All right. So these are your travel documents. You need those. Now, I should have started with you need to make a plan because you want to go visit some place. You want to go on vacation, right? And if you want to go on vacation, well, going to have to -- I said "vacation". A "vacation" is a holiday, another word for saying "time off from work". All right? So you want to go on vacation. Sometimes, we say, "We're going to vacation in Italy." Or "on my vacation, I want to visit Italy." Or "I'm taking a holiday in Italy." Okay? So all these words, when people say, "Well, what are you doing on your time off?" You might go, "I'm going on vacation." Then they know you're leaving. If you just say, "I'm taking time off from work", you could be home cleaning. But no. You're saying, "I'm going on vacation." They're going to go, "Where are you going to visit? Italy, perhaps? Sicily? Is it going to be a good holiday?" And you go, "Yes. I earned my time." "Earned" means to work for something. "I earned my time off. I'm going on vacation."
How Can You Learn English Alone? Self-Study Plan! Ask Alisha
 
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You've got questions about life in the United States, American culture, or any English related questions you don’t want to sift through textbooks for the answer? https://goo.gl/vJX2vW Ask Alisha now! ↓Check how below↓ To send your question to Alisha it’s simple and will take you less than 30 seconds. Step 1: Go to https://goo.gl/vJX2vW Step 2: Sign up for a Free Lifetime Account Step 3: Ask any question to Alisha and get your question answered in a video! In this video, Alisha answers 14 questions. - How do native speakers use "to have"? I have seen, I've, I have got. Formal and informal? - Can you explain "through," "thorough," "though," and "thought"? They sound similar. - What does "love to hate" mean? When can I use it? - When can I use "ever" in a present perect sentence? (Like "I have ever") - What does "dash" mean and when can we use it? - What's the difference between "several," "sundry," and "various"? - How do we use "well" before someone starts speaking, and "though" after they speak? - I want to study at home (self study). What should I do? - What does "uncountable" mean? - What's the difference between "look into my eyes" and "look me in the eye." - I like to take naps. I like to go for walks/I like to take a nap. I like to go for a walk. Difference? - How do we write a good paragraph? - Why is it called the present perfect tense if it refers to the past? - I would like to know how to use "down," "up," "off," "in," "on," and "out" after a verb and why it's necessary. Your favourite English teacher Alisha takes the questions you've been asking and lay them out in an easy-to-follow format. Turn those question marks into exclamation points and get on with your English study. Interact with Alisha to clear up any confusion you have or just satisfy your curiosity. Not only you’ll be able to send questions but also power up your language with your free lifetime account. Learning English is made easy for you. Follow and write to us for more free content: ■ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnglishClass101 ■ Twitter: https://twitter.com/EnglishClass101
English Vocabulary for difficult situations: confess, regret, condolences...
 
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Imagine you said or did something that hurt your closest friend. You feel terrible, and you want to ask for forgiveness. How should you express yourself? What words should you use? It's not always easy to say the right thing in difficult situations. I am here to help. In this lesson, I will teach you vocabulary that will allow you to express yourself in conversations of an awkward or upsetting nature. We will look at words like "regret", "empathize", acknowledge", "mend", and more. I will also give you a few examples, and we will practice together to help you sound genuine during a difficult conversation. You might even be able to fix the situation if you use the right words. So watch the lesson, do the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-apologies-condolences/ and good luck. NEXT, watch these videos for more vocabulary: 1. How to talk about religion: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HMrfHk5Y7Iw&index=10&list=PL1MxVBsQo85q6Yb2v9hLIurN6nm7vTBMi& 2. Don't care about religion? Maybe you want to talk about DRINKING! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_52p4x0ugI&index=9&list=PL1MxVBsQo85q6Yb2v9hLIurN6nm7vTBMi TRANSCRIPT I'm dreaming of a white Christmas. Hi. James from engVid. Dreaming, what am I dreaming about? Well, this lesson, to be honest. I'm trying to find a way that would be easier to have difficult conversations. It's a dream, but it's a dream I'm going to help you turn into a reality. Today what we're going to look at is nine words... ten words to give you to use in conversations that you might find difficult in English that no one else has given you. I will give you some situations that you could use these words in, and then we're going to play, have a little bit of fun. Okay? It's something you can do by yourself, you can do it with a friend, or a group, and it will help you become more creative and a lot better with English, more like a native speaker because you'll understand what these words are and how to use them appropriately. Are you ready? Let's go to the board. As E says, these are difficult conversations. There are many different types, from relationship and work, so we're going to have a bit of fun. And I'll start off with the words first. Let's look at the word "confess". When you confess something it means you must give the truth or tell the truth about something, something that someone hasn't known, you will have to tell them. Right? I have to confess that I like yellow and I'm wearing yellow underwear. You didn't know, it's hidden, but now you know. "Resolve", it means to find a way. If you resolve to do something, you want to resolve, you have decided to do something and you've got a strong... A strong desire to do it. A resolve to lose 15 pounds means I've made a promise to myself to work towards that to do that. "Regret". Regret, you say you're sorry, and it means I feel bad about it. When you regret you wish you didn't do it. I regret breaking off with a girlfriend five years ago because she would have made the perfect wife. I regret. "Condolences", use this one what we call sparingly, which means don't use it a lot. Condolences... Or the word "condolence" is usually reserved for death. Okay? So, when you say "condolence", if you say: "I give my condolences", you wouldn't say that if someone lost their job. "Oh, you lost your job? My condolences." They're not dying. They just don't have work. Okay? They have a future. But if you hear someone is really sick, they have cancer, serious cancer or their parent or someone that they know has died, then you would say: "I offer my condolences." You can even use it for a pet, if their dog that they've had for ten years has died, offer condolences. It means I'm extremely, extremely sorry that this has happened to you. Okay? "Empathize". "Empathy" is to feel like someone else. "Empathize" is to... We can understand and have... Share the emotion with you. We have that empathy. And I say, I see a poor person on the street, and someone says: "Look, they're lazy." I go: "Can't you empathize? Imagine what it would be like. Feel what they feel." "Mend". "Mend" means to fix, fix something. You want to mend it. You can mend a relationship. If you're fighting: We need to mend this relationship. All right? We need to make it better, fix it. If you break your arm and it's fixed, the arm is mended, you go your arm will mend; fix. I like "disillusion". "An illusion" is something you think is true, but it's not. It's an illusion. Magic tricks. Here you go, here it's gone. Whenever I go like this, there's the illusion that I've been standing here waiting for you to come back. Right? It's all cameras. To be disillusioned is to believe something was true and you find out it's not true anymore. You think your mother or father is the greatest person on the planet, and then you find out, just like you, they have flaws or weaknesses, and they make mistakes. […]
10 Common English Grammar Mistakes : Improve your Grammar Fast!
 
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In this video we look at common grammar mistakes you may be making. These could include mistakes with irregular plural nouns, mistakes with the present simple third person, mistakes with adjectives and English articles, as well as many more. Improving your grammar should be easy with Love English! You can also practice your grammar by using the link below. https://www.englishgrammar.org/exercises/ Follow us on social media : Facebook: www.facebook.com/LoveEnglishwithLeilaandSabrah/ Instagram: Love_English_UK
Learn English Grammar: The Sentence
 
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http://www.engvid.com Do you know how to build a sentence in English? In this lesson, you will learn the basic parts of a simple sentence, or independent clause. Knowing this will make it easier to understand any sentence in written English. Understanding how these different parts of a sentence work together to form meaning will help you write better in English. The knowledge in this lesson is essential for any 'Independent User' or 'Proficient User' of English. Quiz yourself here: http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-the-sentence/ TRANSCRIPT Hi again. I'm Adam. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. Today I have a very important lesson, I think, for all of you that will help you very much with your reading, but especially your writing skills. Okay? Today we're going to look at the sentence. What is a sentence? Now, I know that all of you are saying: "Well, we know what a sentence is. We've learned this a thousand times before." Right? I know what you've learned and I know what you haven't learned, many of you; some of you have, of course. The sentence has a very basic structure, there's a very basic component that must be involved or included in a sentence, and a lot of grammar teachers, a lot of English teachers don't teach this. Okay? All of you, I'm sure have by now heard of "SVO", but have you heard of "SVsC"? Have you heard of "SVC"? Maybe yes, maybe no. But I'm sure a lot of you are going: "What? I've never heard of these things before." Well, we're going to talk about this in one second. Before we talk about a sentence, we have to talk about a clause. Now, what is a clause? I'm sure you've heard this word before as well, but just in case, a clause is any subject, verb combination. It's a group of words that must include a subject and a verb. Now, also very important to remember: it must be a tense verb, meaning that it must take a time; past, present, future. Okay? No base verb, no infinitive verb. So that is a clause. Now, there are two types of clauses. Okay? We have independent clauses and we have dependent clauses. The... These are sometimes called subordinate clauses. Now, every sentence in English to be a grammatically correct sentence must have an independent clause. It doesn't need a dependent clause, but it could have one. The independent clause could include a dependent clause as the subject or object. We'll talk about that after. So an independent clause has a subject and a verb, and it can stand by itself. It can contain a complete idea by itself. Okay? So, technically, the shortest sentence you can have in English will be a... Will be an independent clause with a subject and verb. What is the absolute shortest sentence that you can think of? Think of a sentence, the shortest you can possibly make it. Okay? Here's an example: "Go!" Is this a complete English sentence? Yes. Why? Because it contains an independent clause. Where? We have the implied subject: "you" and the tense verb: "go", the imperative tense "go". So this your basic English sentence. Now, we have three other types, three basic types and we can of course play with these after. Subject, verb, object. Some independent clauses must have an object, we'll talk about that in a second. Excuse me. Subject, verb, subject complement. Some sentences must have a subject complement. Subject, verb, complement. Okay? We're going to talk about each of these in a moment. I have the "A" here because quite often, this complement is actually an adverb phrase or an adverbial. We'll talk about that in a second. So your basic sentence can be any one of these three. Now, the reason we're looking at this... All these structures is because once you understand what must be contained in a sentence, then you can read any English sentence out there that is grammatically correct and be able to understand the main idea of that sentence. Okay? So let's start with "SVO". Okay, let's look at our "SVO" type of independent clause: subject, verb, object. Now, first, what is an object? Well, we have two types of objects to talk about. We have the direct object, we have the indirect object. Now, the thing to understand is that the object always answers a question about the verb, it completes the meaning of the verb by asking the questions: "What?" or: "Who?" Now, keep in mind that technically, it's: "Whom?" But if you say: "Who?" I'll let it go this time. Okay? Formal academic writing, "Whom?", "Whom?", "Whom?" IELTS, TOEFL, SAT, all that - "Whom?" not: "Who?" In the object position. But the direct object answers: "What?" or: "Who?" about the verb. Okay? We'll get back to that.
Instantly improve your English with 3 easy words!
 
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Improve how you sound in English by mastering when these three words are used! I've met thousands of English learners at all levels. Most of them, even the advanced students, make mistakes with the words "a", "the", and "to". These are some of the most common words we use, so in this lesson I'm going to teach you how we use these words. I don't want to look just at grammar; I want you to understand these words and why we use them. If you're an advanced English student, this will be a great review for you. If you're a beginner, try to understand this and save yourself years of English mistakes. TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/instantly-improve-your-english-with-3-easy-words/ TRANSCRIPT Doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo. The things I do for love. There's not a thing... Hi. James from engVid. Today's lesson is about instantly improving. Now, I know... "Instant", what does that mean? People say it all the time. I want to show you a little trick that will make your English sound better instantly, and I will give you a technique that you can use after to help practice this. What I have found are students have a mistake or make a mistake when they drop these three words, and because of that I know you're not a native speaker. But today I'm going to address that, show you the three words... Okay? Explain why, and then I will give you a technique that you can use at home soon as you go back over this video or any video to practice it, and you will get instantly better. 10-20%. Okay? Want to know what I'm talking about? Let's go to the board and look at something you've learned, but today you're going to understand. You ready? So, Mr. E said: "Which three words can help you sound like a native speaker?" I'm going to help you a little bit by doing this, and then we're going to go to the board. The words I'm talking about, and you might not consider them words but they are words are: "a" or "an"... Okay, and I consider that one word because it's modified. Right? "The" and "to". Of course you're going to say: "Yeah, James, we know all these. We learned this at beginner, so how does that instantly help me improve my English?" The problem is this: When a person knows something they will talk, when they understand they will change their behaviour or they will use the information. Many students know about articles and the preposition "to", but they actually don't use them in sentences. Many times I've heard students go... Say: "I need to go work tonight." Soon as you say that I know you're not a native speaker. Or if they say: "I bought car yesterday" or "I bought food..." Not "some food". "I bought apple yesterday at the store." I'm like: "A-... You mean an apple, right?" They don't think to say it, because they know: "Teacher, you know what I'm saying." And I go: "Yeah, I know what you're saying, but the way you said it I know English is not your first language." So what I want to do is get you to come back to understanding, not just knowing why these words are important, the fact that, especially with the articles we're going to talk about, they are in most of the sentences. You can almost not get by a sentence without using them. So let's go to the board and take a look. First, what is an article? Well, you'll see an article is the letter "a" or "an". Quickly on that one, "an" is used when we have a vowel sound, sound... Not a... Not just a vowel. So when you say: "A apple", we know "a" and "a" make it difficult for us to actually get it out and for you to understand, so we add: "an" to put a consonant to make it easier for the listener. "I want an apple." Oh, okay, cool. How about "hour"? Teacher, that has an "h" in front of it. I'm like: "Enh?" But we say: "hour", we don't say: "h-our", because with "a" we have to say: "an hour", and that once again tells me one hour. You keep noticing I keep saying "one". I'll explain in a second. Now, this is what we call and indefinite article. I.e. it's not special. When I say to you: "I want a marker", a marker. All right? I'm talking about this. See this? They're all basically the same. I don't care what type of marker. "A" just means generally speaking marker. That's why it's indefinite; it's not special. When we look at the word "the", "the" is special. In this case, when I say to you: "I want the marker", which one do you think I'm talking about? Can you see the difference? Clearly. Even if you don't know, you would look and see four, and see this and go: "He's probably talking about this one." So with a definite article what's happening is someone is being very specific. Well, there are two things. They could say something is special or something is specific. Okay? And here we have definite article is "the". "Tell the man I like him." Okay? "Tell the man", in this case both of us have to know what you're talking about, because if there are 10 men you'll go: "Which man?"
How to Pronounce 10 Difficult Words | British English Pronunciation
 
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Let's learn 10 difficult words and how to pronounce them with a perfect British English accent. Everything I teach in this video is related to the modern British pronunciation we hear in the South of England. My British Pronunciation Course: https://www.etjenglish.com Skype Lessons: https://etjenglish.acuityscheduling.com Instagram: https://instagram.com/etjenglish Facebook: https://facebook.com/etjenglish Twitter: https://twitter.com/etjenglish Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/etjenglish About me: My name is Elliott and I'm an online pronunciation teacher and accent coach from the UK. I teach on YouTube and Skype, helping people improve and learn the British accent, as well as the clarity/accuracy of their pronunciation.
Views: 89088 ETJ English
Fix Your Bad English in 50 minutes!
 
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This is your perfect compilation to get fix your bad English and discover mistakes not to do ! Click here https://goo.gl/2CbtBy to access the best English online resources to master the language! ↓Check how below↓ Step 1: Go to https://goo.gl/2CbtBy Step 2: Sign up for a FREE Lifetime Account - No money, No credit card required Step 3: Achieve Your Learning Goal and master English the fast, fun and easy way! You've decided to start learning English, so let's get you on the path to fluency! In this video, we'll give you many tips to fix your English and avoid mistakes to do. If you are an absolute beginner English learner, this video is made for you. Our host expresses herself in simple English, with English subtitles. This video will challenge your listening comprehension skills and help you progress in your English study. This is THE place to start if you want to start learning English. Follow and write to us using hashtag #EnglishClass101 - Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/EnglishClass101 - Twitter : https://twitter.com/EnglishClass101 Click here to get started with the English language: https://goo.gl/2CbtBy Also, please LIKE, SHARE and COMMENT on our videos! We really appreciate it. Thanks!
15 ways to improve your English pronunciation
 
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Problems with your English pronunciation? In this lesson, I will give you lots of advice, practical tips, and resources to help you improve. After watching this video, you will have a deeper understanding of what is important for proper English pronunciation. I will teach you proven methods to become a better English speaker. https://www.engvid.com/15-ways-to-improve-your-english-pronunciation/
"DOWN" Phrasal Verbs in English: close down, bring down, break down...
 
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You've never learned phrasal verbs like this before! In this video, you'll learn the ideas behind phrasal verbs with the word "down" in them. You'll learn "close down", "bring down", "shout down", and many more. Most importantly, I always want you to learn the hidden meanings of words so that you can understand them when you hear them out of context, in a way you haven't seen them before. I'll go over examples for how these phrasal verbs are used in conversation and we'll practice using them together on the whiteboard. Then test your understanding with the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/down-phrasal-verbs-in-english/
Learn English without teachers and workbooks | Canguro English
 
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A lot of people think that they need courses, products, systems and teachers to learn English. In this class I will show you how you can learn real English on your own using self study, and discover the true meaning of learning. See you in class! ***** Official Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/canguroenglish Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/canguroenglish Podcast: https://www.soundcloud.com/canguroenglish ***** Become a patron and sponsor free English education here: https://www.patreon.com/canguroenglish ***** Buy official Canguro English merchandise here: https://www.redbubble.com/people/canguroenglish
Views: 13141 Canguro English
Fluent English Conversation   - 3 powerful tips to become achieve fluency
 
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Powerful, proven techniques to help you master English conversation based on latest research. Three simple ideas that you can use right away. Learn the Master patterns! Easy to learn and master. It requires effort but you will want to do it! Become the fluent speaker you want to become.
Views: 13492 English Breakthrough
Pronunciation Tricks - The Magic E
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ Is it "fat" or is it "fate"? If you want to know the correct pronunciation, watch this lesson, and learn how "the magic E" in English can tell us how to pronounce other sounds in a word! It sounds complicated, but it's actually really easy once you learn the trick. Watch the lesson, then test your knowledge with the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/pronunciation-tricks-the-magic-e/
Talking about SLEEP in English
 
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Did you "doze off" last night or "pass out"? Learn the difference between these phrasal verbs, as well as lots more sleep-related vocabulary and expressions in this English lesson. You might not realize it, but we talk about sleep a lot! It makes sense if you think about it -- a large portion of our lives are taken up with sleep. In this lesson, you will learn common vocabulary, expressions, and phrasal verbs related to sleep, like "insomnia", "nightmare", "doze off", "pass out", and many more. If your DREAM is to speak English like a native speaker, this lesson will help you get there! Take the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/talking-about-sleep-in-english/ TRANSCRIPT When am I going to have time for sleep? Hi. James from engVid. New Orleans, it's a city of the United States. It's known for Mardi Gras in February. The town never sleeps. People are doing stuff all the time. And today's lesson is on, believe it or not, not New Orleans, but sleep. A lot of you guys, it's something... It's something we do, if you think about it. You're awake and one-third of your life is spent sleeping. And in your own language you have many words for "sleep", and we do, too. And some of these words I don't think you've ever been taught. If so, I'm going to try and help you remember them, and go through a couple phrasal verbs and good and bad words. So let's go to the board, shall we? Sweet dreams are made of these. "Sweet dreams", what does that mean? It means... Depending. If I say to you: "Sweet dreams", I want you to dream, have a good night's sleep and dream or "sweet dreams", I'm having a good one. In this case, look at Mr. E. How are you...? Oh. He's fast asleep, so he can't hear me. But you'll notice he's sleeping, he's got some zzz' up here, and he's sweet dreams. Cake, ice cream, and engVid. Okay? If you think about our site, you'll have good dreams. So let's start on the good side, shall we? Because that's where we should have a good night's sleep. Right? That's easy enough. "Good night's sleep", you sleep all the way through the night and you feel fantastic. If you have a little sleep, let's just say you've had a really busy day and you're a little bit tired. When I was a little boy we used to call it a "nap". So for 20 minutes or maybe 30, 40 minutes you'd go upstairs quietly, go into a little ball and go to sleep for 20 minutes and you'd take a nap. Well, now it's the 21st century and everything's more aggressive, so you don't have a nap, you have a "power nap". 20 minutes, total relaxation, total focus. So today it's gone from "nap" to a "power nap". And when you tell people you're having a power nap, you're going to sleep like a kitten and coming out like Batman. Okay? That's what they say now, so I'm power napping. It's a way of making it sound more important than: "I'm tired. I need to sleep." Okay? Number two: "dream". A dream is basically pleasant thoughts while you're sleeping. That's what it is. You're travelling, having fun with your friends, kissing your favourite person. [Kisses] That's me. And that's a dream. You're having pleasant thoughts as you're sleeping. Okay? What about "bedroom eyes"? If you like those movie stars and that, do you look in their eyes? Yes, and you go: "Oh my gosh, he's so sexy. He's so lovely. I love his eyes." Bedroom eyes are sexy eyes. People have bedroom eyes. Now, there's another one for you: "Catch some zzz'" See up here? Mr. E is going: "[Snores]. Zzzzzz. [Snores] Zzzzzz." Catching zzz' is get some sleep. You'll often hear people say: "Man, I got to catch some zzz' before my airplane. I need to get some sleep." Why we pick "z", I don't know. Maybe it's the last letter of the alphabet and by the time you get there you're tired. And finally let's talk about "pillow talk". What is "pillow talk"? Pillow talk. No, you don't go: "Yo, pillow, you are so sexy. Look at your bedroom eyes. You're beautiful." No. When we talk about "pillow talk" it's actually when you're in bed with your partner or lover, and you talk about things, intimate things like how you like their hair and their eyes, or what a good day you've had, and it's really kind of romantic, and it's quiet and it's nice, and then it ends in cuddling, which is another word for hugging in the bed and mmm. It's not necessarily sex. It's the nice thing after. Right? Sexual talk and cuddling, ladies, holding and touching after the big event. Yeah? Yeah. Tell your husband or your significant other person: "I like a little pillow talk when we're done, and we'll have it more often." Guys, listen carefully when you hear that one. Okay? Because your bedroom eyes won't always get you there. That's the good, and I'm sure you're all smiling, going: "I like these. I get to nap, a little sleep. I get to have pleasant thoughts. I have... Use my eyes to make myself look much more attractive. I get to relax by getting some good sleep in there. And finally, if I talk and cuddle everything's good." Right?
Learn English: MAKE or DO?
 
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"Stop making mistakes" or "stop doing mistakes? "Do" and "make" are some of the most used verbs in English, but they are regularly confused by English learners. I'm going to teach you the logic of when to use "make" and when to use "do". Watch this lesson and you'll understand how to use these verbs correctly. You'll also learn collocations: words that often go with "make" and "do", like "do the dishes", "do your homework", "make dinner", "make a call", and many more. Learning to use these two simple words correctly will make you sound much more fluent to native English speakers, so don't miss out! https://www.engvid.com/make-or-do/ TRANSCRIPT "To be or not to be?" that is the qu-... No, it's not the question. You are here to learn a lesson. Hi. I'm James from engVid, and today's lesson is going to be on "do" or "make". Well, why am I doing this lesson? Many students make a mistake with these two verbs. Okay? And the problem is native speakers almost never make this mistake, and as soon as you make this mistake we will know that you are just learning English or low-level English. So this lesson will help you fully understand how to use it so that you can start speaking like a native speaker right away. Now, in order to do that we have to clearly know what the difference is between "do" and "make", and then give examples of how we use them. I'll also give you collocations. Collocations are words that go with "do" and "make" regularly so you know even if you're having a difficult time, when you say something like: "cake", you're going to say "do" or "make". Let's find out in five seconds, shall we? Let's go to the board where I'll break down what "do" is and give you examples; what "make" is, give you examples; then I'll give you those collocations and a short quiz. All right. E, what is it, "do" or "make"? When I makes me a cake, do I do me a cake or make me a cake? Well, let's find out. If an action is repetitive, something you do on a regular basis, we're going to use the verb "do". Now, I should note very quickly here I am not going to talk on the auxiliary, like: "Do you like that?" I'm not going to ask these questions. We have other videos, so please go to engVid, go check them out, and they'll clearly do... Do, [laughs]. Show you the uses of "do" as the auxiliary. Okay? This is specifically how you understand it. If something is done repetitively, we use "do", which is true for most simple present verbs. When we talk in the simple present it's about repeated actions. So, "do" is no different from that. Okay? Obligation. An obligation might be something like I do homework every night. It's a thing I must do. Okay? So we use it for obligation. Multiple actions. Now, listen to me carefully. "I do the dishes." I'll give you a visual representation or a visual picture of it in a second, but I want you to understand the concept. A lot of times in English we use what's called "shorthand". Instead of saying every verb that I'm going to do, what I do is I use... Or I even said it here, replacing verbs. We put the verb "do" in and it talks about several actions in one go. Here's an example for you: When I do the dishes, I wash them, I dry them, I put them away. Notice there are three verbs. I don't want to say when someone says, like E goes: "Did you do the dishes?" Go: "Yes, I wash the dishes, I dry the dishes, I put the dishes away." They'll go: -"You new to Canada, correct?" -"Yes, very correct." Okay, so I said: "I'll do the dishes" or "I do the dishes". So, even under obligation I said: "I do the dishes every night", that's my obligation. And it's these actions I'm talking about. Repetitive because I do it every night, I repeat it. Okay? Multiple actions, so I've just went through, and replacement of verbs. This is similar to multiple actions, but you can use the verb "to do" to replace one verb, like: "Hey, man. I got to do my hair tonight." That means "fix", that might be cut my hair, it might be wash my hair, but when I got to do my hair, I got to do my hair, and do my nails. That means cut and clean. It's not saying multiple verbs. It's just replacing one verb, but we can put "do" in there and it replaces that verb, and we understand what it means. Is there something you have to do? Okay, I've killed that. Right? So why don't we go to "make"? "Make". "Make" is create, when you create something. Creation comes from it didn't exist and now it does. You create. That's making. And when I say "create", there's a big difference between the two. Okay? Notice when we talked about "do" we talked about repetitive, obligation, multiple actions, dah-dah-dah-dah. It's a verb of action and so is "make", but the difference is this: When I talk about "do", you can't see it. Sorry, you can see it, but you can't touch it. You can see me washing, but you can't touch me washing the dishes. It doesn't make sense.
Tenses | Basic English Grammar in Hindi (all 12 parts of tenses)explanation in hindi by Sanjeev sir
 
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Basic English Grammar: Parts of Speech – noun, verb, adjective, pronoun, adverb...
 
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In this video, I will go over the different parts of speech in English. We will be looking at the use of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, and adverbs. You will also learn how to arrange them in a grammatically correct sentence. Also, I will teach you in what order to place the adjectives if you have more than one. For example, do you have a "big, white, excitable dog" or a "white, excitable, big dog"? Find out by watching this lesson and doing the quiz afterwards at https://www.engvid.com/basic-english-grammar-parts-of-speech/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. James from engVid. I would like to talk about something that will help you understand English, and it's two things. Number one are parts of speech. What are the parts of speech and how do you use them? The second is called syntax, which is a very complicated word for word order. Where do you put the words in a sentence? In some languages they have a different word order, some languages it doesn't really matter, but what my job today is, is to show you where the words go and: What do they basically mean-okay-in the parts of speech? As E said: "Words. Where do they go?" Now, if you're new to English or even if you're an intermediate student, sometimes this causes you problems. Right? You've heard the terms: "preposition", "determiner", "syntax", and you're like: "Oh, it's so complicated." Today's lesson will be simple. You can go over this again and again. It will help you understand and use English better. So I'm going to start off with the most basic part of parts of speech, and I want to start with the things part. Things. Not actions, but things. I am a person. My watch is a thing. Okay? An animal, a cat or a dog, or an apple, these are things. We call these things nouns, because nouns name people - Hi, I'm James; places - Toronto, Ontario; things - my watch; animals - a cat, meow; and food - an apple. Okay? These are nouns. Example: boy, dog, apple. Okay? Nouns name these things. But sometimes you don't want to keep using the same noun again and again. "James ate the apple and James walked his dog as James talked to his friend, Oliver, and then James..." It gets what we call repetitive and boring, and it also makes the sentences go really slow. And sometimes we want to use the noun in a different way. So in this case we introduce what's called pronouns. Pronouns can replace nouns in a sentence. So now you could say something like this: "James ate the apple and he walked his dog." Instead of: "James ate the apple and James walked his dog", we can use a pronoun to replace it and make it simpler. We still know we're talking about James. Now, we talked about word order or syntax. Let me explain this. In order to use a pronoun first you must use the noun. Okay? You introduce the noun and then you can replace it with a pronoun. That's why you see number one then number two. You cannot just start with a pronoun. If I started a sentence at the beginning: "He went to the store." The very first thing you will say to me is: "Who's he?" I go: "Oh, James went to the store and he bought the apples there." And you go: "Oh, now I know who he is." So, pronouns kind of number two because you have to actually introduce first with a noun, then you can replace it with a pronoun. Now, we have several types of pronouns. I'm just going to go over and show you a couple of them so you get an idea. Pronouns include: "I", "we", which are subject pronouns. Object pronouns when we're talking about something that's not us, but something on the other side that receives action, as a subject pronoun I do things. I run. Right? We eat dinner. We're talking to them. Now, when we say "them", you go: "What?" Well, they are receiving it and we call those object pronouns. Okay? So the most basic ones are subject and object pronouns. One is doing something, one is receiving. There are reflexive pronouns, like: "himself" where somebody is talking about themselves. "He built the house himself." So he's talking about him as an object, but reflecting it back to himself. We call it reflexive pronoun. Okay? There are others, but I'm not going to get into them right now because I want to keep this simple just so you know what the parts of speech are, and you can always come to engVid to come and see other lessons in which we go deeply into reflexive pronouns, object and subject pronouns. Okay? Cool. So we talked about how pronouns can replace nouns, and we're good with that. Yeah? So let's go to stage number three, because once you've replaced them, how do you know the difference between them? Apple, apple. I don't know. That's when we have adjectives. Adjectives. The word itself can be broken into two parts: "ject" and "ad". But remember... Do you remember when I said subject and object, and I gave you the example? I said, for instance: "I" is a subject pronoun. Right? Subject, yeah, I'm good at this.
How to have a conversation about RELIGION in English
 
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Religion and beliefs are an important part of our lives, but talking about them can be difficult. If you're not careful, you might offend someone or even get into trouble. In this video, I'll teach you how to discuss religion politely so you can have respectful conversations in English and learn about other cultures. You'll learn vocabulary related to major religions and beliefs so you can discuss popular faiths intelligently. Most importantly, I'll teach you how to use open-ended questions that will help you develop conversations with people who have different beliefs. I'll talk about Judaism, Christianity, Buddhism, Islam, and others while discussing how people can identify as being religious, spiritual, orthodox, or non-practicing. I'll also explain the difference between of atheists and agnostics. The world is full of many cultures and beliefs. We all have so much to learn from each other, so take your English conversations to the next level by learning to discuss religion. Test your understanding of the lesson by taking the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-have-a-conversation-about-religion-in-english/ TRANSCRIPT You are healed. You are...Hi, James from engVid. When I'm not actually teaching English, sometimes I do religious services. I'm joking, but this is a serious matter. By the end of this video, I would like to make sure that when you speak to people of different religious faiths or backgrounds, you will be able to, when you will remember that...Well, how to talk about religion, or faith, or belief. Okay? Sometimes we talk about religion, and sometimes we can say "faith" or "belief" and it means to believe in a higher power; it could be God, it could be a Spirit, whatever moves you. I think it's kind of a serious lesson, because religion is a very powerful force in our lives, and we should be respectful of one another or to each other when we discuss it. You can't have an open dialogue if you have a closed mind. "Dialogue" means to talk, okay? So, this lesson is to help you be able to speak to someone else who doesn't believe the same way you do, so at least you understand each other. Listen to me carefully: You don't have to always agree or like, but you can respect and understand, and that's today's lesson. So, ready to get serious? Let's go to the board, shall we? Okay. So, you'll notice I have different symbols up here. I am a terrible drawer. I can't do anything. The worm is as good... Sorry, E. Mr. E is as good as I get, so this is as good as you're going to get. So if you go: "My faith is not there. I'm Bahai." I'm like: "You're behind me, because I don't know how to draw it. Sorry." So, here are some of the world's major religions that have billions of people that follow, or hundreds of millions. So I tried my best. Forgiveness if I didn't get it quite right. Okay? Nobody get upset. I did a bad drawing for all of you. Let's go to the board. One of the most common questions people say when they talk about religion, they meet you and go: "Hi. My name is James. I'm from Canada. I teach English. Do you believe in God?" And that's the problem right there. "Do you believe in God?" You're going: "What's the problem? It's a question." Yeah, but it's a yes/no question. Please check out the other videos I have on making interesting conversation, because especially in this one, when you say yes or no, you really limit the person, or we say put them in a corner. You put me in a place where I'm with you or against you. Already we have division or friction. So why don't we ask a question that lets them speak to us, and explain to them where we're coming from so that we can get a mutual understanding? Now we understand together. And I think I've got two questions that can help you make friends from different faiths, so you understand each other and start that dialogue. Remember? Talking. If you say: "Are you a person of faith?" you're not... They can say yes or no, but you're actually not saying "God". Remember I said "faith" or "belief"? "Belief" means to think something is real. "Faith" means to believe something... Believe in something. And when you're thinking of that, I don't necessarily have to think of God. I could think of a force that makes the world go around. Gaia. Some people believe in Gaia. Life... The Earth is alive and we're part of the Earth. That's a belief, it's a faith. Some people believe... Have... Well, you don't have a belief in science. You could say it's a belief, but they believe in science. Right? And that has nothing to do with God. So when people say: "Do you believe in God?" They're really saying: "There are those who believe in God, and the blasphemers and the heathens", and it doesn't have to be like that. Some people don't believe in the book, but they actually believe in the same God you do. So, give them a break. Okay? And ask: "Hey, are you a person of faith?" And they might say: "Yes, I do believe in a higher power." Okay?
Everyday Idioms & Expressions Used in Britain
 
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Join my pronunciation / speaking online course: https://www.etjenglish.com Video: Too many people learn outdated idioms. I'm here to give you idioms, which are actually used in Britain on a daily basis! I hope you learn some new idioms here and also improve your British pronunciation along the way! Join the family: Facebook: https://facebook.com/etjenglish Insta: @etjenglish https://instagram.com/etjenglish Twitter: https://twitter.com/etjenglish Fun Time by Dj Quads: https://soundcloud.com/aka-dj-quads Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/uk0IaUT9niw About me: I am a pronunciation/accent coach who also helps learners with modern, everyday British English speaking. I teach you the English lessons you wish you were taught in school!
Views: 62641 ETJ English
How to understand native English speakers...  and speak like them!
 
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You've been studying English for a long time. You already know that no matter how much you learn, it can be difficult to understand native speakers. They speak quickly, drop entire syllables, and stick words together. They don't speak exactly like the textbooks teach us, and in fact they make a lot of mistakes! In this video, I will explain clearly the "relaxed pronunciation" that native speakers use, and teach you how to listen so that you understand what they are saying. Once you have practiced this and can understand more of what you hear, you can start to speak like this yourself and be more fluent and natural while speaking English. 1000+ MORE ENGLISH LESSONS https://www.engvid.com/understand-native-speakers-relaxed-pronunciation/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. James from engVid. Do you ever notice how you don't always understand what English people are saying? It's like the words are kind of together? Well, I'm going to tell you a secret: You're right. It's called relaxed sple... Spleech? Speech, or blended speech. See, I put spleech together? And it just makes sense. And I'm going to get to that in a second, and I'm going to give you a visual so you can understand where we're going. Notice E is relaxed, he's not really trying hard. When you're speaking your natural language you don't want to try hard all the time. Right? So I actually use another one: "wanna", which I'm not going to talk about today. But we're going to get there. Right? We're going to get to the board and take a look at what I want to teach you. It's how to sound like a native speaker, but also how to understand a native speaker. Okay? Because we do this blending or relaxed speech quite regularly. All right? So it's actually almost more normal... A more normal part of our language. So what is relaxed speech? Well, relaxed speech happens when a native speaker... Speakers-sorry-change sounds or drop letters or syllables when they are speaking fast for things they say a lot. I'll give you an example. Nobody wants to say: "Do you want to go to the movie tonight?" So we say: "Do you wanna go to the movie?" For you, you're like: "What happened?" Well, we dropped the "t"-okay?-and we combined "want" and "to". We even change the "o" to an "a" to make it easier, so: "You wanna go?" For you, you're thinking: "Youwannago", that's a new English word: "youwannago". And it's like: No, it's not. It's "wanna" as in "want to go". Another one is: "See ya". In "see ya" we change and we drop the ending here, we put: "See", and "you" becomes "ya": "See ya later". No one says: "See you later." It sounds weird when I even say it to myself. "See you later. Bye." But: "See ya later" rolls off the mouth. It's because both of these things we say at least 10, 20, 30 times a day, so we change it, we make it relaxed to make it comfortable like E. Okay? Problem for you is you go to school or you're reading a book and it says: "Do you want to", "Did you ever", no one speaks like that but you, so today we're going to change that. Okay? So I'm going to teach you, as I said, how to understand it when it's said to you, but also how to get it out. Warning: Please use the books first or, you know, listen to... We have other videos on pronunciation, use those first. You have to master the base sounds first. You have to be able to say: "Do you want to", because what you don't understand is when I say: "Do you want", when I change it to: "Do you wanna", I almost say that "t", so I have to have practice saying the proper sound before I can drop it. Got it? It's like you got to practice a lot before you can play well. Okay. So, once you've got that down and you start using this, people will go: "Hey, man, where are you from? Because I hear some accent but I really can't tell. Do you want to tell me?" And I say... I did it again. "Do you want to tell me?" You're like: "Woo, no. It's my secret, engVid." Okay, anyway, so today what I want to work on specifically is "do" and "did". Okay? Because there are a few things we say, and there are what I call sound patterns for the relaxed speech that you can learn to identify what people are saying to you. Okay? So I'm going to come over here and I want you to take a look. "Do" or "Did", and here's the relaxed version of it. When we're done this we're going to have a little practice session because with pronunciation it's important you actually practice it, not you take the lesson, you go: "Thanks, James, you taught me and now I know." You actually have to go through it. So the first one we want to do is this one: "Do you want to", easy enough. Right? "Do you want to go to dinner? Do you want to have a friend over? Do you want to have pizza?" When we actually say it, what happens is there are two cases here. In the first case: "do" or "d" changes to a "ja", "ja" sound. And it comes: "Jawanna", so this is gone, the "d" is gone, we changed it to a "j". And remember what we talked about with "wanna"? The t's gone so it becomes: "Jawanna".