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How To Catch Breast Cancer Early: Stanford Doctors Explain Mammography Options
 
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There are several breast cancer detection options, and it is recommended that all women over age 40 get their mammograms. It has been shown that regular screening can catch breast cancer early and save lives. Stanford radiologists Drs. Debra Ikeda and Jafi Lipson explain the different types of imaging available and also explain the newest technology, tomosynthesis, or 3D mammography. Visit: http://stanfordhealthcare.org/bcaware
Views: 40490 Stanford Health Care
Can Mammogram Radiation Cause Breast Cancer?
 
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What is the risk-benefit ratio of the cancers picked up by mammograms and the cancers caused by mammograms? Subscribe to Dr. Greger’s free nutrition newsletter at https://www.nutritionfacts.org/subscribe and get a free recipe from his new HOW NOT TO DIE COOKBOOK. (All proceeds Dr. Greger receives from his books, DVDs, and speaking directly support NutritionFacts.org). Here’s some of my videos on radiation exposure from other sources: • Cancer Risk from CT Scan Radiation (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/cancer-risk-from-ct-scan-radiation/) • Does Cell Phone Radiation Cause Cancer? (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/does-cell-phone-radiation-cause-cancer/) • Fukushima & Radioactivity in Seafood (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/fukushima-and-radioactivity-in-seafood/) • Do Dental X-Rays Cause Brain Tumors? (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/do-dental-x-rays-cause-brain-tumors/) We’re halfway through my 14-part series on mammograms. If you missed any previous videos, here they are: • 9 out of 10 Women Misinformed about Mammograms ((http://nutritionfacts.org/video/9-out-of-10-Women-misinformed-about-Mammograms) • Mammogram Recommendations - Why the Conflicting Guidelines (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Mammogram-Recommendations-Why-the-Conflicting-Guidelines) • Should Women Get Mammograms Starting at Age 40? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Should-Women-Get-Mammograms-Starting-at-Age-40) • Do Mammograms Save Lives? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Do-Mammograms-Save-Lives) • Consequences of False-Positive Mammogram Results (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Consequences-of-False-Positive-Mammogram-Results) • Do Mammograms Hurt? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/do-mammograms-hurt) The greatest radiation risk from mammograms is the exposure to radiation treatments for overdiagnosed pseudodisease. I explore that more in my next video. Stay tuned for: • Understanding the Mammogram Paradox (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Understanding-the-Mammogram-Paradox) • Overtreatment of Stage 0 Breast Cancer DCIS (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Overtreatment-of-Stage-0-Breast-Cancer-DCIS) • Women Deserve to Know the Truth About Mammograms (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Women-Deserve-to-Know-the-Truth-About-Mammograms) • Breast Cancer and the 5-Year Survival Rate Myth (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/breast-Cancer-and-the-5-Year-Survival-Rate-Myth) • Why Mammograms Don’t Appear to Save Lives (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Why-Mammograms-Don) • Why Patients Aren’t Informed About Mammograms (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Why-Patients-Arent-Informed-About-Mammograms) • The Pros and Cons of Mammograms (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/The-Pros-and-Cons-of-Mammograms) Have a question about this video? Leave it in the comment section at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/can-mammogram-radiation-cause-breast-cancer and someone on the NutritionFacts.org team will try to answer it. Want to get a list of links to all the scientific sources used in this video? Click on Sources Cited at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/can-mammogram-radiation-cause-breast-cancer. You’ll also find a transcript and acknowledgments for the video, my blog and speaking tour schedule, and an easy way to search (by translated language even) through our videos spanning more than 2,000 health topics. If you’d rather watch these videos on YouTube, subscribe to my YouTube Channel here: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=nutritionfactsorg Thanks for watching. I hope you’ll join in the evidence-based nutrition revolution! -Michael Greger, MD FACLM Captions for this video are available in several languages. To find yours, click on the settings wheel on the lower-right of the video and then "Subtitles/CC." http://www.NutritionFacts.org • Subscribe: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/subscribe • Donate: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/donate • HOW NOT TO DIE: http://nutritionfacts.org/book • Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NutritionFacts.org • Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nutrition_facts • Instagram: http://instagram.com/nutrition_facts_org/ • Google+: https://plus.google.com/+NutritionfactsOrgMD • Podcast : http://nutritionfacts.org/audio/
Views: 24236 NutritionFacts.org
A Year of Breast Cancer
 
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More detailed information at Anncredible.com about the natural treatments also used to treat cancer. A journey through the first year of breast cancer... from Mammogram to Diagnosis, Seven rounds of dose dense Chemotherapy to Mastectomy and finally Reconstruction. More treatments still to go. Please share to show your support!! You can also check out my blog for natural cancer treatments at ConnectingHealthyDots.com.
Views: 686829 TheAnncredible
Mammograms Cause Breast Cancer - Dr. Ben Johnson
 
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Visit our website: http://www.thetruthaboutcancer.com/ Join TTAC's 500K+ FB fans: https://www.facebook.com/thetruthabou... Support our mission by commenting and sharing with your friends and family below. ---------------- Summary ---------------- In this video, Ty Bollinger speaks with Dr. Ben Johnson about why mammograms do not detect breast cancer early and why they actually cause breast cancer. The full interview with Dr. Johnson is part of the "The Quest For The Cures Continues" docu-series. -------------------------------------------------- About The Truth About Cancer -------------------------------------------------- The Truth About Cancer’s mission is to inform, educate, and eradicate the pandemic of cancer in our modern world. Every single day, tens of thousands of people just like you are curing cancer (and/or preventing it) from destroying their bodies. It’s time to take matters into your own hands and educate yourself on real cancer prevention and treatments. It could save your life or the life of someone you love. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Inside The Truth About Cancer Docu-Series --------------------------------------------------------------------- Doctors, researchers, experts, and survivors show you exactly how to prevent and treat cancer in our 3 original docu-series: "The Quest For The Cures”, “The Quest For The Cures Continues”, “The Truth About Cancer: A Global Quest”, and on our website: http://www.thetruthaboutcancer.com In our docu-series you’ll travel with Ty Bollinger who lost both his mother and father to cancer (as well as 5 other family members). Ty travels the country and the globe and sits down with the foremost doctors, researchers, experts, and cancer conquerers to find out their proven methods for preventing and treating cancer. Please join our email list to be notified of all upcoming events (including free airings of our docu-series): http://thetruthaboutcancer.com Learn more about our latest docu-series “The Truth About Cancer: A Global Quest” here: https://go2.thetruthaboutcancer.com/g... ------------- About Ty ------------- Ty Bollinger is a devoted husband, father, a best-selling author, and a Christian. He is also a licensed CPA, health freedom advocate, cancer researcher, former competitive bodybuilder, and author of the best-selling book "Cancer - Step Outside the Box," which has sold over 100,000 copies worldwide. After losing his mother and father and several family members to cancer, Ty’s heartbreak and grief coupled with his firm belief that chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery were the NOT the most effective treatments available for cancer patients led him on a path of discovery. He began a quest to learn everything he possibly could about alternative cancer treatments and the medical industry. What he uncovered was shocking. On his journey, he’s interviewed cutting-edge scientists, leading alternative doctors, and groundbreaking researchers to learn about hidden alternative cancer treatments. What he uncovered help to create The Truth About Cancer and its 3 awe-inspiring docu-series’:”The Quest for The Cures”, “The Quest For The Cures Continues”, and “The Truth About Cancer: A Global Quest.” Ty has touched the hearts and changed the lives of thousands of people around the world. Ty speaks frequently at conferences, local health group meetings, churches, and is a regular guest on multiple radio and TV shows and writes for numerous magazines and websites. ----------------------------------- Dr. Ben Johnson, Ty Bollinger, The Truth About Cancer, The Quest For The Cures, breast cancer, mammograms, mastectomy, mammogram, mammography, lump in breast, breast lumps, breast cyst, breast cancer facts, breast cancer signs, breast biopsy, what is breast cancer, breast exam, breast lump, cyst in breast, breast abscess, what causes breast cancer, lumps in breast, breast ultrasound, mamogram, breast screening, breast cancer in men, painful lump in breast, breast cancer causes, breast examination, breast cysts, breast care, breast cancer news, painful breast lump, dense breast, mammogram screening, breast tissue, abnormal mammogram, mammogram guidelines, mammogram age, mammogram results, 3d mammography, early signs of breast cancer, breast mass, lump on breast, brest cancer, breast mri, breast check, breast cancer screening, diagnostic mammogram, what is a mammogram, breast health, breast disease, breast cancer diagnosis, symptom of breast cancer, breastcancer, digital mammography, facts about breast cancer, cysts in breast, breast tumor
Views: 189096 The Truth About Cancer
MAMMOGRAMS MISS 40% OF CANCER
 
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In part one of this video, I talk to Nancy Cappello, of Are You Dense. She is a cancer survivor who never missed her annual mammogram, and every year for 11 years got the "all clear" after her imaging -- but mammograms are NOT ENOUGH for women with Dense Breasts. Head to https://alivewithjoan.com for Part 2!
Views: 967 JoanLunden
Breast Cancer (Breast Tissue, BRCA genes, Biopsy, Lumpectomy, Mastectomy, Mammogram, & Treatment)
 
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Learn about Breast Cancer, Screening, Mammograms, Biopsy, Lumpectomy, Mastectomy, Diagnosis, BRCA genes, Her2, Treatment, DCIS, LCIS, Ductal Carcinoma, & Lobular Carcinoma. This video was created to promote awareness about breast cancer. However, this information cannot substitute for health care provided for by a physician or other qualified medical professional. Some of the content used in this video was obtained from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). http://www.cancer.gov/ For more information: http://www.cancer.org/acs/groups/cid/documents/webcontent/003090-pdf.pdf Thank you for the support: Bill Branson, Photogroup, Don Bliss, Dr. Dwight Kaufman, Andy Rahardja, Zuhha Ashraf, and Elliott Burdette Thanks to our teachers: Daniel Kleven, Michael Boyd, Natasha Savage, and Ravindra Kolhe. Collaborations: Video Reviewer: Dr. Christopher Heaton
Views: 234161 Ryan Jajosky
3D Mammography Finds Breast Cancer
 
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After finding a small lump on her breast, Stephanie scheduled a mammogram with University Hospitals. During her appointment, she received both traditional 2D imaging as well as 3D tomosynthesis mammography. The tomosynthesis scan located a small, cancerous tumor in her breast. Fortunately, the cancer was discovered before it had spread and Stephanie is now cancer free. For more on tomosynthesis and breast cancer screening, visit http://ow.ly/AfuH7. Please note that as of September 8, 2016, University Hospitals Case Medical Center has changed its name to University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center.
Views: 2307 University Hospitals
Breast Cancer Diagnosis - TheVisualMD.com
 
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Almost 80% of breast cancers occur in woman over the age of 50. Some risk factors are genetic, but obesity, alcohol consumption, family history, race. Breast imaging and early detection improved vastly in the last 25 years, but self testing is very important. Over the age of 40 screening is advised every year by a mammogram. Ultrasound and MRI also are used in detection of breast cancer. Cysts and tumors are detected and treatment is determined based on these medical imaging techniques. Needle biopsies are used to take a tissue sample. The sampling is also guided by these imaging techniques for more accuracy. Visit http://thevisualmd.com/health_centers/cancer/breast_cancer/diagnosing_breast_cancer_video for the full experience!
Views: 11278 theVisualMD.com
How to Recognize Breast Cancer Symptoms
 
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Watch more Client Videos videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/418228-How-to-Recognize-Breast-Cancer-Symptoms Over the course of a woman's lifetime, she may experience breast changes. While many end up being nothing to worry about, it's important to have any changes that you notice checked by a doctor -- just to be on the safe side. Here are the potential breast cancer symptoms to watch out for. Warning This video does not replace actual medical advice. Always consult your doctor with any questions or concerns. Step 1: Do a monthly self-exam Start performing a monthly self-exam as soon as your breasts are fully developed. Checking yourself regularly is important -- you need to know what your breasts feel like normally so you can recognize any changes. Examine yourself several days after your period ends, when your breasts are least likely to be swollen and tender. If you're no longer having periods, choose a day that's easy to remember, such as the first or last day of the month. Keep in mind that it's not uncommon for breasts to feel lumpy due to benign fibrocystic breast disease, cysts, scar tissue, infections, and other causes that have nothing to do with cancer. Tip For instructions on how to do a breast self-exam properly, go to "Breastcancer.org":http://www.breastcancer.org/. Step 2: Have lumps checked Know what you're feeling for: a lump that feels different from your breast's normal lumpiness, like discovering a pebble in your oatmeal. Though many lumps are benign, anything that feels new or odd should be checked by your doctor -- even if you've recently had a clean mammogram. Check for lumps in your armpits, too. Tip Cancerous lumps are more likely to be hard, painless, and unmovable. Step 3: Beware of dimpled skin Look for visible changes, like dimpled, puckered, thickened, reddened, or scaly breast skin, or a flattening or indentation on the breast. All are potential breast cancer symptoms that should be evaluated. Step 4: Note nipple changes Recognize the nipple changes that can indicate breast cancer -- pain; redness; scaliness; itching; skin thickening; the nipple turning inward; or discharge other than breast milk. Step 5: Have pain and swelling evaluated See your doctor about swelling in all or part of your breast, or breast pain. Though swelling and soreness are usually no cause for concern, these symptoms can be signs of a rare but aggressive form of the disease known as inflammatory breast cancer. Step 6: Get regular check-ups Have your doctor perform a breast examination at your yearly check-up, and begin annual mammograms at age 40. If you have a family history of the disease, tell your doctor: they may suggest that you start having mammograms at an earlier age. Knowing the signs of breast cancer -- and being proactive about knowing how to recognize them early -- is the best way to protect yourself. Did You Know? In a "Breastcancer.org":http://www.breastcancer.org/ survey of more than 2,200 women, 37 percent said they first detected their breast cancer with a self-exam.
Views: 2241373 Howcast
Reasons NOT to get an annual Mammogram
 
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Stop getting annual mammograms. Mammography emits radiation that has actually been causing cancer. There is a better way to be screened and preventative measures you can take to avoid breast cancer.
Views: 5799 Clark Hansen, N.M.D.
THERMOGRAPHY: BREAST CANCER DETECTION YEARS BEFORE MAMMOGRAPHY
 
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There is an abundance of scientific evidence supporting that breast thermography is the most sensitive and accurate way to identify women with breast cancer, especially in women under the age of 55, where it causes the most devastating loss of life. For women over 55, breast thermography is an important adjunct to clinical breast examination and mammography, as this combination has been documented to increase identification of breast cancers to 98 percent.
Views: 10210 Ronald Peters MD
Breast MRI: Do You Have Breast Cancer or at High Risk
 
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Learn about Breast MRIs for newly diagnosed women. We help you identify if you at High Risk and would benefit from annual screening MRIs. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ ________________________________________ Questions for your Breast Surgeon: 1. Will you order a Breast MRI to look for other tumors? 2. Could a Breast MRI change our treatment plans? 3. Do I qualify for a “Screening Breast MRI?” 4. What are the disadvantages of a Breast MRI? 5. What are the benefits of Breast MRIs in newly diagnosed women? By the time someone has had a biopsy showing cancer, they likely have already had a mammogram and possibly a breast ultrasound. Once diagnosed, a “Pre-operative Breast MRI” can sometimes show other cancers that have yet to be identified by mammography or a physician’s breast examination. A Breast MRI can also provide more information about the tumor’s size and involvement of other structures such as the muscle or skin. When used before surgery (pre-operatively), Breast MRIs identify additional cancers in the same breast in about 16% of women and can find previously unknown cancers in the opposite breast in 3 to 5%. The findings from a pre-operative Breast MRI can change the surgical plans to treat your breast cancer. Breast MRIs are commonplace today and ordered by breast surgeons. Ask your surgeon if you would benefit from a Breast MRI before your surgery. Why a “Screening Breast MRI” for women at “High Risk?” Women identified to be a very high risk of developing breast cancer should consider an annual screening Breast MRI in addition to their annual mammogram, according to recommendations (here) by the American Cancer Society. Together, these two screening tests give doctors a better chance of finding breast cancer in high risk women when the cancer is smaller, easier to treat, and easiest to cure. Consider a “Screening Breast MRI” if: You are a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carrier You have a first-degree relative (parent, sibling, child) with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, even if you have yet to be tested yourself Your lifetime risk of breast cancer has been scored at 20 to 25% or greater, based on one of several accepted risk assessment tools that look at family history and other factors such as a biopsy showing Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia (ADH), Atypical Lobular Hyperplasia (ALH), and Lobular Carcinoma In-Situ (LCIS) You had radiation therapy to the chest for cancer (usually lymphoma) treatment between the ages of 10 and 30 What are the downsides of a Breast MRI? If a breast MRI identifies a suspicious area in the breast, it may require a needle guided breast biopsy. Most of these additional biopsies prove to be benign, and can result in further imaging, anxiety, discomfort, and cost. In other words, Breast MRIs can lead to breast biopsies that might be considered unnecessary. There is also evidence to suggest that women who undergo a pre-operative Breast MRI for cancer are more likely to choose to have a mastectomy than those who do not have a Breast MRI. Some leading physicians argue that Breast MRIs lead to unnecessary mastectomies without improvements in cancer outcomes. (see below reference) Ultimately, the choice of having a mastectomy is based on your unique breast cancer situation and your personal priorities. Should I have a pre-operative Breast MRI? Most importantly, speak with your breast surgeon. Ask specifically what the advantages and disadvantages are for your unique situation. Over the last decade, more and more pre-operative Breast MRIs are being performed. This trend will likely continue as breast surgeons seek more information before making surgical treatment decisions. Those that benefit most from a pre-operative breast MRI are women younger than 50 years old, those with dense breasts, and BRCA mutation carriers. Ask your surgeon if your biopsy report also shows several high risk findings such as Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia (ADH), Atypical Lobular Hyperplasia (ALH), and Lobular Carcinoma In-Situ (LCIS). If your cancerous breast biopsy also showed these High Risk findings, then you benefit more from a pre-operative Breast MRI. You would likely also qualify for annual screening Breast MRIs in the years to come after your treatment if you are deemed at high risk and have a lumpectomy. What is the take-home message? In general, most breast surgeons feel pre-operative Breast MRIs are a good idea unless someone is elderly or extremely claustrophobic and would not tolerate the confined space of the MRI machine. If your breast surgeon never mentions a pre-operative Breast MRI as an option, you should inquire to become better informed.
Breast Cancer - Lump Symptoms, Mastectomy, Mammogram - Breasts #3
 
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I have explained the breast cancer, it's symptoms, treatment and diagnosis. Breast cancer can develop from glandular tissue and more precisely from the lobules or ducts of the gland. Therefore we have the lobular and ductal carcinoma. Usually they are discovered when a patient reports a lump that recently appeared. Mammogram is one of the best ways to discover it as well. http://www.biodigitalhuman.com/. Music. Easy Lemon 60 Second by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-... Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Continue Life by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-... Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Breast Anatomical Illustration: Original author: Patrick J. Lynch. Reworked by Morgoth666 to add numbered legend arrows. - Patrick J. Lynch, medical illustrator This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license. Please, subscribe to get our newest videos and lessons: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... My Facebook fan page: https://www.facebook.com/FahriceDjozic3
Views: 24863 Easy and Simple!
If You Want Breast Cancer, Get a Mammogram
 
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Schedule a Health Consultation! http://www.drcurtisduncan.com/2009/05/holistic-health-coaching.html http://www.naturalnews.com/010886.html, http://www.preventcancer.com/patients/mammography/dangers.htm Discussing how mammograms actually cause or increase your risk of breast cancer.
Views: 5049 Curtis Duncan
Battling Breast Cancer:  3-D Breast Cancer Mammograms
 
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New 3-D breast cancer tests are promising better results in detecting more cancers.
Views: 3037 ABC News
Dense Breast Tissue - The Greatest Breast Cancer Risk You Never Heard Of
 
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Dense breast tissue prevented mammograms from detecting my breast cancer. 40% of women have dense tissue. Are you one of them? Find out now - it could save your life.
Views: 16054 rabbithillinn
BREAST CANCER: Good Morning America Reporter Amy Robach Diagnosed After On Air Mammogram
 
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BREAST CANCER: Good Morning America Reporter Amy Robach Diagnosed After On Air Mammogram SUBSCRIBE to NewsBreaker's YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/YgsSEg Amy Robach announced on Good Morning America she has breast cancer after undergoing a routine mammogram on air. At 40 years old, it was Robach's first mammogram and she was reluctant to do it for a special report on October 1st on the popular morning program. The mother of two will have a double mastectomy as an aggressive form of treatment. FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/newsbreaker.ora TWITTER: http://twitter.com/newsbreaker TUMBLR: http://nboratv.tumblr.com/ STORIFY: http://storify.com/newsbreaker CHECK OUT our homepage: http://www.ora.tv/newsbreaker
Views: 20926 NewsBreaker
Reporter discovers breast cancer after TV mammogram
 
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Anchor Amy Robach announces on GMA she has breast cancer and will undergo a double mastectomy this week
Views: 1487 live3activated999
Watch Jackie Clarke's mammogram
 
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Monty Tags Along To Jackie Clarke's Mammogram A mammogram is a safe, low-dose x-ray of the breast that can pick up very small breast cancers, well before a lump can be felt. Women have a 95% chance of surviving breast cancer five years or longer if the cancer is detected by a mammogram. Because the risk of breast cancer increases as you get older, BCFNZ recommends women consider having regular screening mammograms from the age of 40.
Mammograms Are One of The Leading Causes of Cancer!
 
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Could one of the most popular methods of early detection actually be a leading cause of cancer? Andreas Moritz says that mammograms cause more damage than any possible benefit. Find out what he says about the amount of radiation one gets from a mammogram and what kind of damage that can cause. http://www.ihealthtube.com
Views: 26360 iHealthTube.com
Being Called Back After a Mammogram
 
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The gold standard in breast cancer screening, mammography offers an x-ray view of the breast. The American Cancer Society recommends women start getting them at age 40, and every year thereafter. "The reason that we do it every year is that we're looking for subtle changes in the pattern over time. So if something begins to become distorted or a mass shows up or calcifications that are suspicious show up, those are the things that we're looking for," says Dr. Gail Santucci, diagnostic radiologist with Lee Memorial Health System. Certain breast tissue is easy to read, others make it more difficult. "She's our favorite candidate for screening because she has very small tissue. Tumors would show up very easily in a patient like this," says Dr. Santucci. The denser the breast, the harder it is to spot minor variations. Doctors are looking at two images of each breast. At least eight to ten percent of patients are called back to take more pictures. "With those four views we are taking of the breasts, we aren't looking up close at particular areas, we are kind of getting an overview and look for anything that triggers us to look closer," says Dr. Santucci. In itself, it doesn't mean the test was 'positive'. "It could be that the tissue overlaps funny on the mammogram pictures and it looks like it could be distorted by a mass, when in fact it's just normal tissue. It could be that we see a mass on the mammogram and we're not sure if it's a cyst or if it's solid," says Dr. Santucci. One to two percent of patients will undergo a biopsy. Only a half a percent end up having breast cancer. So getting a call back after a mammogram is no reason to hit the panic button. "I think that's one of the most misunderstood portions of mammography. People become very concerned when they get a call," says Dr. Santucci. View More Health Matters video segments at leememorial.org/healthmatters/ Lee Memorial Health System in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of medical care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For nearly a century, we've been providing our community with everything from primary care treatment to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Visit leememorial.org
Views: 17326 Lee Health
3D Mammograms: Who Needs 3D & Why Get One Every Year
 
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We teach you about the advantages of 3D digital mammograms for women with dense breasts and those at a higher lifetime risk of breast cancer. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ ___________________________________ Questions for your Primary Care Physician or Breast Surgeon: 1. Should I have a 3D Mammogram? 2. What are the benefits of 3D mammograms? 3. Do I have significantly Dense Breasts on my prior mammograms? 4. Am I at a High Risk for breast cancer in my lifetime? 5. Is the extra cost covered by my insurance? 6. What is “3D mammography?" “Three-dimensional” (3D) mammograms can image your breasts with better clarity than standard, “two-dimensional” digital mammograms. This new technology, also called “breast tomosynthesis,” will become the standard of care in breast screening in the next few years. 3D imaging is performed just like a normal mammogram, but with an X-ray machine that moves during the imaging. The radiation dose is about the same as a digital mammogram.3D mammograms capture images from more angles and uses computer technology to allow breast radiologists to not only find more cancers, but lessens the chance you will be “called back” for further imaging studies. Women that have 3D mammograms also have a slightly lower chance of undergoing a “benign breast biopsy.” It is a leap forward in breast care and is slowly rolling out to breast imaging centers across the country. Who benefits most from 3D Mammograms? *Women with very Dense Breasts *Younger Women (aged 40 to 49) *Women at “High Risk” for developing breast cancer Why is Breast Density a risk factor for cancer? We have learned over time that women with dense breast tissue have a higher risk of developing breast cancer in their lifetime. Breast density is a term now used to describe how much glandular and supportive tissue appears on a mammogram. Studies estimate that if you have very dense breasts, your lifetime risk is twice and possibly up to four times the risk of others. Dense breasts also make it more difficult for radiologists to see a small breast cancer because these growths can be overshadowed by the dense or “white” appearing tissue on a mammogram. 3D imaging helps address this “double-whammy” of increased risk and decreased ability to find breast cancers. The “Take-Home Message” for those with dense breasts is to begin annual screening mammograms at 40 and ask for 3D mammograms, if available. Why should younger women get 3D mammograms? “Younger women” generally have denser breasts. In most women, breast tissue slowly becomes less dense as one ages. By younger for this discussion, we are referring to women aged 40 to 50 who undergo screening mammograms. More than half of women in this age group have dense breasts. Because it is more difficult to find small cancers in dense breasts by regular mammography, we recommend 3D imaging for all women younger than 50. Why should women at “High Risk” get 3D mammograms? Women at high risk for breast cancer will benefit most from 3D mammography. Some of these “High Risk” factors include: BRCA mutation carriers, a prior breast biopsy that showed “atypical hyperplasia,” a strong family history of breast cancer, or radiation therapy to the chest region before the age of 30. Many of these same women will benefit from “Screening Breast MRI’s” in addition to annual screening mammograms. Does insurance cover 3D mammograms? Federal law mandates that all health insurance pay for “screening” studies such as routine digital mammography. 3D imaging is considered an additional study by many insurance companies and may not be covered. We expect more commercial insurance companies will cover the 3D part of screening mammograms in the future. Medicare and Medicaid do not currently cover the additional charge for 3D imaging. Some breast imaging centers do offer 3D imaging at no extra charge. It is worth asking about coverage and out-of-pocket costs when you schedule a mammogram. Should I pay cash for a 3D mammogram? Your breast imaging facility may ask you at the time of your mammogram if you are willing to pay for the “3D mammogram add-on charge.” This charge ranges between $25 and $50. Sometimes that question may seem unexpected when you are undressed in the exam room or undergoing imaging. Inquire about the availability of 3D imaging when you arrive and ask what charges you might encounter. You will then have time to make an informed decision.
Amy Robach Reflects on Breast Cancer Diagnosis One Year Later
 
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ABC anchor joins fellow cancer survivor Robin Roberts in sharing stories of recovery and survival.
Views: 83210 ABC News
How 3D Mammograms Help Detect Breast Cancer
 
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The 3D mammogram is still one of the best screening tools available to detect breast cancer, even as researchers continue to look for new uses of technology in detecting disease, such as a recent study on computer-aided detection (CAD) to enhance breast cancer screenings. 3D mammography, or digital breast tomosynthesis, uses low-dose radiation to take pictures of breast tissue that are “sliced” into multiple views. Computer software transforms the views into three-dimensional angles of the breast tissue. The density of the breast tissue determines the number of slices. The denser the tissue, the more slices, or views, the computer generates, providing radiologists and technicians clearer views of — and through — the tissue.
Views: 188 BaptistHealthSF
Breast Imaging: Breast Cancer Screening & Biopsy
 
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We educate you about 3D mammograms, breast MRIs, ultrasounds, density and more. We teach you about breast screening and what to know if newly diagnosed with a breast cancer. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ ____________________________________ What does “Breast Imaging” refer to? Breast imaging generally refers to mammograms, breast ultrasounds, and breast MRIs. Mammograms are most often used to screen women annually for cancer. An ultrasound of the breast is usually performed to determine if a lump or mass is concerning for cancer. Breast MRIs are ordered most frequently for newly diagnosed women to better understand the extent of their cancer before surgery. MRIs are also used annually to screen women felt to be at “high risk” for developing breast cancer in their lifetime. Interpreting these studies is difficult to do really well. It is not uncommon for a breast cancer to be overlooked on your imaging, thus delaying a diagnosis of cancer for months or years. That is why you should seek a radiologist who specializes in breast imaging. Under their guidance, cancers may be detected earlier and fewer biopsies of non-cancerous areas may be recommended. If possible, seek your breast imaging at more specialized breast imaging centers. When should I start getting mammograms every year? We still recommend beginning annual, screening mammography at the age of 40. Recent national guidelines recommend starting later at 45 or 50 years old. This has generated an intense discussion and debate amongst patient advocacy groups and the world of medicine. Make sure to take our specific lesson “When should I start getting mammograms?” We address the advantages and disadvantages of breast screening so you can make an informed decision with your physicians about when to begin mammographic screening. What are the "Cutting-edge Advances" in breast imaging? Breast imaging technology is rapidly improving. You might hear about these advances occasionally from your friends or on the news. We are the first to organize all of these cutting-edge technologies into one, patient-friendly website. We cover breast imaging topics such as: *Should I have a 3D mammogram? *Would I benefit from a breast MRI? *Does my radiologist specialize in breast imaging? *Do I have dense breasts? What is my BI-RADS density score? *Am I at high risk for developing breast cancer? *What is “Automated Whole Breast Ultrasound” and breast density? Should I ask for copies of my breast imaging reports? All of your medical records belong to you. If you’ve been diagnosed with breast cancer, you need to read your reports to better understand your unique cancer. This allows you to engage your breast surgeon and make sure something is not missed or overlooked. You will likely forget the details about your cancer, treatment, and imaging as the years pass. We recommend you create a folder and gather all of your cancer information. You will get better quality care from future physicians when you can share with them the specifics of your breast cancer. Register for our newsletter and “cutting-edge” questions. Sign-up for our video-based breast health updates (here). Once registered, we’ll immediately email you our complete list of “cutting-edge” questions for your breast surgeon, medical oncologist, and radiation oncologist. We help you get quality breast cancer care in your community.
Remember to have a screening mammogram every two years to detect breast cancer
 
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One in nine women in Australia will develop breast cancer in their lifetime. Having regular mammograms through BreastScreen WA is one of the best things you can do to detect breast cancer early, and improve your chance of survival. For more information or to book an appointment visit the BreastScreen WA website at www.breastscreen.health.wa.gov.au or call 13 20 50.
Can breast cancer be detected by mammogram ? |Health Forum
 
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The benefit of screening mammography is earlier detection and lower risk that the breast cancer will 10 a mammogram can show lumps up to 2 years before they be felt. Learn more about other imaging tests and emerging areas in early detection 18 the earliest sign of breast cancer can be an abnormality depicted on a to decrease mortality, although its 5 2011 xeni jardin live tweets her first mammogram, is diagnosed with mammograms diagnose their own? . Breast cancer fact sheet council australia. Among the 60 percent of women with breast cancer who detected 4 doctors often use additional tests to find or diagnose. Having a mammogram breast cancer foundation nzmammogram accuracy of mammograms. How is breast cancer detected? What does the doctor look for on a mammogram? . If your doctor finds an area of concern on a screening test (a mammogram), or if you have symptoms that could mean breast cancer, will need more tests to know for sure it's cancer 18 when possible, the reading mammogram compare it we dense tissue can make harder find cancers while mammograms are routinely administered detect in women who no apparent symptoms, diagnostic used after suspicious results some signs alert physician check. 19 inflammatory breast cancer is an advanced and accelerated form of breast cancer that usually goes undetected by mammograms or women often detected breast cancers themselves, either by self examination use of screening mammography, a large percentage of breast cancers are detected although the nhis oversampled minority populations, we could not use the i did what the medical field and the countless number of cancer advocacy of mammography alone to detect cancer in women with dense breast tissues you be diagnosed with breast cancer after routine breast screening, or you have your gp will examine you. Diagnostic mammography is similar to screening except that more a breast mri be used after woman has been diagnosed with cancer check 2 for many women, detecting on mammogram might as difficult density declines menopause, but in others it does not 8 important detected early. Women should get regular screening mammograms to detect breast cancer early detection and diagnosis mydr. The mri scan will make detailed pictures of areas inside the breast 5 purpose screening is to detect cancer earlier than it would for cancer, mammography does a modest job at achieving these. Even if you have a lump in only one breast, pictures will be 23 the case of mammograms or other imaging tests, your doctor's office breast cancer is suspected already diagnosed, likely get screening mammogram an x ray breasts to detect before it shows any signs symptoms. Different tests can be used to look for and diagnose breast cancer. Susan g mammography in breast cancer background, x ray can you be diagnosed with just one day? . Overall getting a false positive result can cause fear and worry [29 31]. Self detection remains a key method of breast cancer are you dense stories. Early detection of breast cancer through being 'breast aware' and mammogram screening can help the todaywe're taking worry out waiting. Have potential abnormalities that have been detected on a screening mammogram 3 dense breast tissue is very common and not abnormal. Such signs include a lump the first place where breast cancer patient will encounter radiologist, (though during screening, radiologist examine and interpret mammogram, radiological detection of early stage dcis 21 diagnostic mammograms involve taking more views than screening. Ones that on this page you will find a list of common tests, procedures, and scans doctors use many tests to find, or diagnose, breast cancer. Mammogram national breast cancer foundation. Breast cancer diagnosis breast screening tests and early detection. Html url? Q webcache. Googleusercontent search. On a screening mammogram, doctors have you get diagnostic mammogram. Early detection does not save lives the limits of breast cancer screening new york times. The breast cancer a mammogram can't detect oprah. Cdc how is breast cancer diagnosed? . Tests at the breast cancer clinic hide which means a mammogram isn't as effective ultrasound in detecting has to reach certain size be detected. What mammograms show calcifications, cysts breastcancerbreastcancer. Early detection can reduce the chance of early breast cancer with screening mammography means that treatment be started earlier in course disease, possibly before it has is good at finding cancer, especially women ages 50 and older. Radiologist role in breast cancer diagnosis moose and doc. You can call monday through friday to request a same day screening mammogram hearing that there be an abnormality on strike fear in even the most abnormalities are not breast cancer. Guidelines for breast screening society of imagingbreast cancer diagnosis the cancers mammograms are likely to miss forbes. Different tests help determine if a lump be cancer. How is breast cancer detected? . How breast cancer
Views: 106 BEST HEALTH Answers
Mammography vs. Thermography for Detecting Breast Cancer - Dr. Veronique Desaulniers
 
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In this video, Ty Bollinger speaks with Dr. Veronique Desaulniers (Dr. V.) about the differences between Mammography and Thermography for detecting breast cancer. The full interview with Dr. Desaulniers is part of "The Quest For The Cures Continues" docu-series. Be sure to sign up to secure your free spot at the next airing of our latest docu-series, A Global Quest, here: http://bit.ly/a-global-quest-free --------------------------------------------------- Join TTAC's 1 MILLION+ FB fans: http://bit.ly/agq-fb-ttac Find us on INSTAGRAM: http://bit.ly/agq-ig-ttac Visit our website: http://bit.ly/agq-website-ttac Our mission is to educate the world, expose lies & empower people with life-saving knowledge. Help us share the truth by clicking the SHARE button above! -------------------------------------------------- About The Truth About Cancer -------------------------------------------------- The Truth About Cancer’s mission is to inform, educate, and eradicate the pandemic of cancer in our modern world. Every single day, tens of thousands of people just like you are curing cancer (and/or preventing it) from destroying their bodies. It’s time to take matters into your own hands and educate yourself on real cancer prevention and treatments. It could save your life or the life of someone you love. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Inside The Truth About Cancer Docu-Series --------------------------------------------------------------------- Doctors, researchers, experts, and survivors show you exactly how to prevent and treat cancer in our 3 original docu-series: "The Quest for the Cures”, “The Quest for the Cures Continues”, “The Truth About Cancer: A Global Quest”, and on our website: http://bit.ly/agq-website-ttac In our docu-series, you’ll travel with Ty Bollinger who lost both his mother and father to cancer (as well as 5 other family members). Ty travels the country and the globe and sits down with leading experts, doctors, researchers, and cancer conquerors to find out their proven methods for preventing and treating cancer. Please join our email list to be notified of all upcoming events (including free airings of our docu-series): http://bit.ly/join-ttac-mission Learn more about our latest docu-series “The Truth About Cancer: A Global Quest” here: http://bit.ly/a-global-quest-silver --------------------------------------- About Ty & Charlene Bollinger --------------------------------------- Ty Bollinger is a devoted husband, father, a best-selling author, and a Christian. He is also a licensed CPA, health freedom advocate, cancer researcher, former competitive bodybuilder, and author of the best-selling book "Cancer - Step Outside the Box," which has sold over 100,000 copies worldwide. Charlene Bollinger is a devoted Christian, happily married wife, joyful mother of 4 beautiful home-educated children, health freedom advocate, and co-founder and CEO of The Truth About Cancer. Together, they host a bi-weekly internet news program: TTAC Global Health News: http://bit.ly/ghn-episodes After losing several family members to conventional cancer treatments, Charlene and Ty set out to learn the truth about cancer and the cancer industry, working together tirelessly to help others to learn the truth that sets them free to live healthy, happy lives. Ty & Charlene's heartbreak and grief coupled with their firm belief that chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery were NOT the most effective treatments available for cancer patients, led them on a path of discovery. They began their quest to learn everything they possibly could about alternative cancer treatments and the medical industry. What they uncovered helped to create The Truth About Cancer and its three awe-inspiring docu-series’: ”The Quest for The Cures”, “The Quest For The Cures Continues”, and “The Truth About Cancer: A Global Quest.” Ty has touched the hearts and changed the lives of thousands of people around the world. Ty speaks frequently at conferences, local health group meetings, churches, and is a regular guest on multiple radio and TV shows and writes for numerous magazines and websites. --------------------------------------- Join Us Next Time --------------------------------------- If you enjoyed this clip, sign up to secure your free spot at the next airing of A Global Quest here: http://bit.ly/a-global-quest-free
Saying No to Mammograms by Gaea Powell
 
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Are Mammograms worth the risk for repeated Radiation that causes cancer and compression that can spread cancer if present? Thermography and Ultrasound may be a better option.
Views: 393 Gaea Powell
Stage I Breast Cancer Diagnosis Story
 
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Elyn Jacobs was called in for more films after what she expected to be a routine mammogram. She assumed that the lab had mixed up her results or something to that effect. Her doctor had noticed calcifications in the images of her breasts and recommended Elyn have a biopsy done. The next day she received a call. She was diagnosed with stage I breast cancer. Her doctor told her to get it taken care of right away, so she did. Elyn says the important thing to remember when you receive a diagnoses is to keep a level head. SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE EXPERT INFORMATION AND BREAKING BREAST CANCER NEWS http://www.youtube.com/user/drjayharness VISIT BREASTCANCERANSWERS.com FOR INFORMATIVE VIDEOS http://www.breastcanceranswers.com CONNECT WITH US! Google+: http://bit.ly/16nhEnr Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BreastCancer... Twitter: https://twitter.com/BreastCancerDr
Overtreatment of Stage 0 Breast Cancer DCIS
 
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9 out of 10 women don’t realize that some breast cancers would never have caused any problems (or even become known in one’s lifetime). This is an issue ductal carcinoma in situ has brought to the fore. Subscribe to Dr. Greger’s free nutrition newsletter at https://www.nutritionfacts.org/subscribe and get a free recipe from his new HOW NOT TO DIE COOKBOOK. (All proceeds Dr. Greger receives from his books, DVDs, and speaking directly support NutritionFacts.org). How might one improve their diet and lifestyle to lower breast cancer risk? See, for example: • Breast Cancer and Constipation (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/breast-cancer-and-constipation) • Cholesterol Feeds Breast Cancer Cells (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/cholesterol-feeds-breast-cancer-cells/) • Breast Cancer Survival Vegetable (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/breast-cancer-survival-vegetable/) • Breast Cancer and Alcohol: How Much is Safe? (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/breast-cancer-and-alcohol-what-much-is-safe/) • Which Dietary Factors Affect Breast Cancer Most? (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/which-dietary-factors-affect-breast-cancer-most/) • Is Soy Healthy for Breast Cancer Survivors? (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/Is-Soy-Healthy-for-Breast-Cancer-Survivors) • How to Treat Endometriosis with Seaweed (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/How-to-Treat-Endometriosis-with-Seaweed) This is 9th in a 14-video series on mammograms. In case you missed the first eight, check them out here: • 9 out of 10 Women Misinformed about Mammograms ((http://nutritionfacts.org/video/9-out-of-10-Women-misinformed-about-Mammograms) • Mammogram Recommendations - Why the Conflicting Guidelines (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Mammogram-Recommendations-Why-the-Conflicting-Guidelines) • Should Women Get Mammograms Starting at Age 40? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Should-Women-Get-Mammograms-Starting-at-Age-40) • Do Mammograms Save Lives? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Do-Mammograms-Save-Lives) • Consequences of False-Positive Mammogram Results (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Consequences-of-False-Positive-Mammogram-Results) • Do Mammograms Hurt? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/do-mammograms-hurt) • Can Mammogram Radiation Cause Breast Cancer? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Can-Mammogram-radiation-Cause-Breast-Cancer) • Understanding the Mammogram Paradox (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Understanding-the-Mammogram-Paradox) Stay tuned for: • Women Deserve to Know the Truth About Mammograms (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Women-Deserve-to-Know-the-Truth-About-Mammograms) • Breast Cancer and the 5-Year Survival Rate Myth (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/breast-Cancer-and-the-5-Year-Survival-Rate-Myth) • Why Mammograms Don’t Appear to Save Lives (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Why-Mammograms-Don) • Why Patients Aren’t Informed About Mammograms (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Why-Patients-Arent-Informed-About-Mammograms) • The Pros and Cons of Mammograms (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/The-Pros-and-Cons-of-Mammograms) Have a question about this video? Leave it in the comment section at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/overtreatment-of-stage-0-breast-cancer-dcis and someone on the NutritionFacts.org team will try to answer it. Want to get a list of links to all the scientific sources used in this video? Click on Sources Cited at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/overtreatment-of-stage-0-breast-cancer-dcis. You’ll also find a transcript and acknowledgments for the video, my blog and speaking tour schedule, and an easy way to search (by translated language even) through our videos spanning more than 2,000 health topics. If you’d rather watch these videos on YouTube, subscribe to my YouTube Channel here: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=nutritionfactsorg Thanks for watching. I hope you’ll join in the evidence-based nutrition revolution! -Michael Greger, MD FACLM Captions for this video are available in several languages. To find yours, click on the settings wheel on the lower-right of the video and then "Subtitles/CC." http://www.NutritionFacts.org • Subscribe: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/subscribe • Donate: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/donate • HOW NOT TO DIE: http://nutritionfacts.org/book • Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NutritionFacts.org • Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nutrition_facts • Instagram: http://instagram.com/nutrition_facts_org/ • Google+: https://plus.google.com/+NutritionfactsOrgMD • Podcast : http://nutritionfacts.org/audio/
Views: 21500 NutritionFacts.org
What is the Relationship Between Calcifications and Breast Cancer?
 
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Dr. Harness and Dr. Robert Smith of the American Cancer Society explain microcalcifications, which are often a concern for women as they show up as white spots on a mammogram. "Calcifications are normal in the breast," says Dr. Smith. "Generally most women will have at least some. They also tend to be associated with abnormalities and they tend to be associated with cancer, which is one of reasons why it is very important to evaluate their morphality." According to Dr. Smith, about 85% of calcification biopsies come back normal. Watch this video to learn more. SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE EXPERT INFORMATION AND BREAKING BREAST CANCER NEWS http://www.youtube.com/user/drjayharness VISIT BREASTCANCERANSWERS.com FOR INFORMATIVE VIDEOS http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/video-categories/ SUBMIT A QUESTION http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask DOWNLOAD DR. HARNESS' 15 QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR DOCTOR http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask CONNECT WITH US! Google+: http://bit.ly/16nhEnr Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BreastCancerAnswers Twitter: https://twitter.com/BreastCancerDr ______ Disclaimer: This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk. If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Why Mammograms Should Not be Used for Breast Cancer Screening
 
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The conclusion of a 25 year prospective study published in the British Medical Journal in February of 2014 was that screening mammograms not only do not save lives but also lead to a 22% over-diagnosis that leads to unnecessary testing and treatment in women between the ages of 50 and 69. After all these years of policy set by governments, research funders, scientists, medical doctors, big pharma, American Cancer Society, and the entire mammography industry, there is now solid evidence that they were promoting screening mammograms based on weak and incorrect scientific studies. You can bet your bottom dollar that despite this solid scientific study on 90,000 women, that because of conflicts of interest related to vested interests that nothing much will change! Very sad scenario...
Views: 1549 DoctorSaputo
Be Wary Of Mammograms
 
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We have long been told that the “gold standard—life-saving” tool for protecting us from the ravages of breast cancer is regular mammograms. So powerful is the pro-mammogram lobby that we’ve come to believe if we do not have regular mammogram x-rays, we are irresponsible as well as at high risk of dying from cancer. This is quite simply not true. And in no way can mammography be considered a risk-free procedure. Far from it. Mammography relies on powerful ionizing radiation, which can actually cause cancer. One mammogram delivers the radiation equivalent of 1,000 chest x-rays into your body. Each year in the United States, an amazing 4 billion dollars is spent on over-diagnosis and false-positives in relation to mammography results. In fact, false positive results are known to be as high as 56% in a woman who has undergone 10 mammograms. Meanwhile, the physical and emotional damage of any woman having to live through “false positive” diagnoses can unnecessarily fill her life with fear. Recently, a massive study on mammography involving 90,000 women studied for 25 years concluded that mammograms have absolutely NO effect on mortality rates. As reported in the New York Times: "One of the largest and most meticulous studies of mammography ever done, involving 90,000 women and lasting a quarter­century, has added powerful new doubts about the value of the screening test for women of any age. It found that the death rates from breast cancer and from all causes were the same in women who got mammograms and those who did not. And the screening had harms: one in five cancers found with mammography and treated was not a threat to the woman's health and did not need treatment such as chemotherapy, surgery or radiation." Earlier on, researchers at Dartmouth in the United States wanted to find out how often lives are actually saved by mammography. They examined breast cancer data from The National Cancer Institute and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They discovered that the probability of a mammogram saving a life is well below 25%. They concluded, “Most women with screen-detected breast cancer have not had their life saved by screening. They are instead either diagnosed early (with no effect on their mortality) or over-diagnosed.” Personally, I have never had a mammogram. Why? Because my gut feeling has always said “no”. This was long before a massive accumulation of clinical evidence began to show up, indicating that the 30kVp range of “low-energy” radiation used in breast screenings is up to 400% more damaging to human DNA (read 400% more carcinogenic) than the so-called “high-energy” radiation which it is often compared to. I would stay away from mammography in any shape or form. How do you protect yoursel from cancer naturally? This is what I’ll be covering in next week’s videocast. Join me then.
Views: 3517 Leslie Kenton
Mammographies, Breast Cancer, Ductal Carcinoma with Pamela A. Popper, Ph.D., N.D.
 
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Nearly half of Americans take at least one prescription medicine, with almost a quarter taking three or more, as diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and dementia grow more prevalent than ever. The problem with medicating common ailments, such as high blood pressure or elevated cholesterol, is that drugs treat symptoms—and may even improve test results—without addressing the cause: diet. Connect with The Real Truth About Health http://www.therealtruthabouthealth.com/ https://www.facebook.com/The-Real-Truth-About-Health-467500836655781/ https://twitter.com/RTAHealth Passionate believers in whole food plant based diets, no chemicals, minimal pharmaceutical drugs, no GMO's. Fighting to stop climate change and extinction.
Surviving Breast Cancer: Mammogram/Ultrasound Radiologist Report
 
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On Sunday, June 28, 2015, I discovered a large lump in my right breast. On Tuesday, June 30, 2015, I had a mammogram and ultrasound performed at the Radiologist office who performs my annual exams. This is where the journey REALLY began.
Views: 168 Penelope Lopez
Diagnostic exams for Inflammatory Breast Cancer
 
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Diagnosing Inflammatory Breast Cancer can be difficult since the cancer is not apparent on ultrasounds, and Mammograms are often painful and difficult for patients with a tender and swollen breast. This video describes the various methods used by physicians at M. D. Anderson to diagnose and treat IBC. These methods include Breast Sonogram, Breast MRI, PET Scans and Biopsy. To learn more about Inflammatory Breast Cancer Treatment at M. D. Anderson visit http://www.mdanderson.org/patient-and-cancer-information/care-centers-and-clinics/care-centers/breast/services/index.html
What is 3D Mammography?
 
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Wondering how Hologic 3D mammography works? This video explains all about this new tool in the fight against breast cancer, which looks and feels like a regular mammogram but offers so much more. It shows doctors breast tissue in thin slices, making it easier for them to see if there is anything to worry about. Each year there are approximately 40 million mammograms performed in the United States,1 the majority with 2D digital mammography. Approximately 4 million are called back for additional examinations, more than 1 million minimally invasive biopsies are performed, about 300,000 cancers are detected,2 and 40,000 women die of breast cancer.3 Doctors and scientists agree that early detection is the best defense against breast cancer. If we find cancer in its earliest stages, the chances of surviving it are good. Until now, the best way to do that has been with digital mammography. While digital mammography is still one of the most advanced technologies available today, it has some limitations because it only provides a two-dimensional picture of the breast. The breast is a three-dimensional object composed of different structures, such as blood vessels, milk ducts, fat, and ligaments. All of these structures, which are located at different heights within the breast, can overlap and cause confusion when viewed as a two-dimensional, flat image. This confusion of overlapping tissue is a leading reason why small breast cancers may be missed and normal tissue may appear abnormal, leading to unnecessary call backs. This is an even greater problem with women who are classified as having denser breast tissue.4 Now there is a revolutionary new tool in the fight against breast cancer: Hologic 3D mammography. Learn more about breast cancer screening and find your Hologic 3D mammography provider at http://www.hologic3d.com. 1 U.S. Food and Drug Administration. "MQSA National Statistics." Last modified October 2 , 2012. http://www.fda.gov/Radiation-EmittingProducts/MammographyQualityStandard... 2 Rosenberg RD, Yankaskas BC, Abraham LA, Sickles EA, Lehman CD, Geller BM, Carney PA, Kerlikowske K, Buist DS, Weaver DL, Barlow WE, Ballard-Barbash R; Performance Benchmarks For Screening Mammography. Radiology. 2006 Oct;241(1):55-66. 3 American Cancer Society, Breast Cancer Fact & Figures 2011-2012. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, Inc., 2012. 4 Bernardi, D, et. al. "Prospective Study of Breast Tomosynthesis as a Triage to Assessment in Screening." Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 133(1) (Epub 2012): 267-71.
Views: 12907 3dmammography
What does a breast ultrasound detect ? |Health Issues & Answers
 
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Breast cysts tests and diagnosis mayo clinic. Sonocine sonogram results for breast cancer detection youtube. Adding 3 d mammography or ultrasound to regular screening the role of breast in early cancer detectionwhy did joan lunden get a ultrasound? Today. Breast cancer breast early detection and diagnosis this test is painless does not use radiation. 18, a breast ultrasound is used find tumors and other breast abnormalities. Not all breast changes mean cancer, but some do 3, here's one more study to add the cancer screening debate new research has found that annual mammogram screenings, combined 13, 2008 ultrasound boosts detection abnormalities or those who carry gene have a close relative does 16. As with any breast 2 ultrasound, for screening, problem solving, looking a cyst or solid mortality rates cancer, unlike mammography, which does. This allows breast ultrasound, also known as sonography or ultrasonography, is frequently ultrasound help detect some masses and the best way to however, does not have good spatial resolution like mammography, 9, role of for detection differentiation this study did include diagnosis multifocal lesions 3, if you your doctor feels a lump in an area concern shows up on mammogram, next step be 18, one measure density thickness tissue mammogram. Ultrasound was slightly better at detecting cancers in dense breasts than we have found that ultrasound does tomosynthesis, but 5, the role of breast early cancer detection identification stage [32], do not play a screening for images are captured real time; That is, only they show cancer, imaging is an extremely useful tool 3, why did joan lunden get and should you one? Additional modalities like can detect tumors stand alone test used as complementary by breasthealth uk. Breast ultrasound for breast lump what happens, why it's donebreast donesusan gbreast american cancer society. Find out what to how do i prepare for a breast ultrasound? A ultrasound is generally not used as screening tool cancer detection because it does always detect some early signs of such 26, long take? Ultrasound examination allows the and identification most lumps. An ultrasound does not replace the need for a mammogram, but it is often used to check abnormal results from mammogram breast part of national comprehensive cancer network (nccn) or american society (acs) screening 18, examine change that's seen on. Breast ultrasound for breast lump what happens, why it's done a url? Q radiologyinfo en info. Ultrasound for ruptured breast implants? Doctor answers, tipsbreast mri detecting cancer in dense breasts news medical. Ultrasound national breast cancer foundation. Ultrasound scan for breast cancer screening moose and doc. Mammography in breast cancer background, x ray mammography. Breast ultrasound purpose, procedure, and results healthlinejohns hopkins medicine health libraryultrasound imaging of the breasts imaginis role breast for detection differentiation help younger women avoid biopsies. Why do think that it has? Second, ultrasound is relatively inaccurate at detecting implant failure unless there a very large quantity of silicone breast ultrasound, also known as sonogram, uses sound waves to form an image internal results with semi automated showed cancer detection rates least high does not use or produce ionizing radiation magnetic resonance imaging (mri) test finding small mass in woman's than mammogram 3, this article about the problem tumors dense breasts, diagnosis mammograms 18, because early detection, intervention, and postoperative treatment, mortality has been decreasingBreast for lump what happens, why it's donebreast donesusan gbreast american society. How ultrasound is used to detect breast cancer breasthealth uk. It cannot determine whether a solid lump is cancerous, nor can it detect radiologist does this procedure after discussing your symptoms and health history, doctor will do breast exam order diagnostic mammogram or ultrasound 15, often done along with an of the. Ultrasound imaging can help to determine if an abnormality is solid (which be a non cancerous lump of tissue or tumor) fluid filled (such as benign cyst) both cystic and breast ultrasound used see whether with (a it. Breast lump early evaluation is essential mayo clinic. Ultrasound, mri screenings can detect more breast cancer abc study ultrasound boosts detection npr. When an mri is used to detect breast cancer, a special dye if you notice lump in your or any change the appearance, feel shape of breasts, which means mammogram isn't as effective ultrasound detecting cancer. There does not appear to be a 'central' mass this lesion, which right makes it less lead additional testing, screening mammography can't detect all cancers, and national breast cancer foundation provides early detection screenings, including mammograms, how an ultrasound help diagnose lump? . Breast cancer (female) diagnosis nhs choices. The rate of detecting malignancies using mammography (x ray)
Views: 870 BEST HEALTH Answers
Breast Self Exams and Mammograms | Health
 
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Dr. Amber Guth, a breast surgeon at NYU Medical Center, covers the basics of breast exams. They should be monthly and a doctor should examine your breasts every year. Between 35 and 40, the American Cancer Society recommends low-risk women get a first baseline mammogram and then one every year after that.
Views: 6515 Health Magazine
ABC's Amy Robach Discloses Breast Cancer Diagnosis on Good Morning America, Plans Mastectomy
 
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ABC News correspondent Amy Robach appeared on Good Morning America Monday morning and revealed that she had breast cancer, a diagnosis that began when she got a mammogram as part of a previous segment on GMA. "I know that I have a fight ahead of me, but I also know that I have a lot worth fighting for," Robach said. Robach admitted she "took one for the team" during GMA's Breast Cancer Awareness Month several weeks ago by getting a mammogram on-air "to demystify it for women who might be nervous." "If I got the mammogram on-air and it saved one life, it would be worth it," she said she'd been told before the initial segment. "It never occurred to me that life would be mine." In an accompanying post, Robach said she went back into the doctor's office for what she thought would be a follow-up, only to be given the diagnosis. Cancer had been so far from her mind that she hadn't thought to bring anyone with her, though she said both her husband and her parents were with her in New York City by that evening. Robach said she will undergo surgery in the coming weeks, which would reveal whether the cancer has spread and whether chemotherapy would be necessary. "I can only hope my story will do the same and inspire every woman who hears it to get a mammogram, to take a self exam," Robach wrote. "No excuses. It is the difference between life and death."
Views: 6329 naila alpassawi
Dr. June Chen on Mammography & Breast Cancer Screening
 
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Dr. June Chen talks to Every Way Woman about mammograms, the difference between screening mammograms and diagnostic mammograms, and the techniques used to perform breast biopsies. A mammogram is the best tool doctors have to detect breast cancer. Unfortunately, mammograms aren’t perfect and have some limitations. For example, mammograms have a difficult time detecting tumors in women with dense breasts. Fortunately, radiologists have other ways of examining breast tissue, such as breast MRIs and screening ultrasounds, which allow them to examine breast tissue more thoroughly. There are two types of mammograms: screening mammograms and diagnostic mammograms. Radiologists use screening mammograms to examine women who don’t have any breast cancer symptoms. Radiologists use diagnostic mammograms on women who do have signs of breast cancer, such as a lump, retracted nipples, or nipple leakage, or if they've found an abnormality on a screening mammogram and they want to investigate it in more detail. A young woman in her 20’s or 30’s who feels a lump should always have it checked out by their primary physician. Normally, the physician will recommend an ultrasound rather than an MRI, because a young woman’s breast is more sensitive to X-Rays than an older woman’s breast. Breast biopsies are performed using a number of different procedures. Doctors perform them using stereotactic guidance, which uses X-rays, ultrasound guidance, or MRI guidance. Dr. Chen recommends women start mammograms at age 40 and have one every year. The goal of mammogram screenings is to find tumors while they’re very small, before they get big enough to detect with a physical examination. The sooner a woman detects breast cancer, the easier it is to treat and cure. To learn more about Breastlink and breast cancer, visit our website: www.breastlink.com
Views: 173 Breastlink
Mammograms Vs Thermography: Better For Cancer Patients
 
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Can Thermography Detect Cancer? Thermography shows inflammation and can show hot spots in tissue. It can be a good way to monitor inflammation / cancer. Are Mammograms Bad For Cancer Patients? Thermography is better and safer because they don't use radiation or smash the breast tissue. A thermography scan cannot diagnose cancer, but it can clearly show inflammation. ------- To subscribe to ChrisBeatCancer on YouTube: http://www.chrisbeatcancer.com/subscribe-yt 20 Questions For Your Oncologist (Free). KNOW what questions to ask: http://www.chrisbeatcancer.com/20qyt What every new cancer patient needs to know: http://www.chrisbeatcancer.com/every-cancer-patient-yt Health and Cancer Coaching (Get module 1 for free through the link below) http://www.chrisbeatcancer.com/health-coaching-cancer-coaching-yt Subscribe to ChrisBeatCancer on YouTube: http://www.chrisbeatcancer.com/subscribe-yt ============== The information in this video is not intended as medical advice. In addition to searching the Internet for information related cancer and health, please consider consulting with a qualified medical healthcare professional. #chrisbeatcancer
Views: 2759 chrisbeatcancer
Finding Breast Cancer in Breast Implants
 
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Women over the age of 40 are strongly encouraged to get yearly breast cancer screenings, even if they have breast implants. Dr. Priyanka Handa, a radiologist on Lee Health’s medical staff, says mammograms are one of the most effective tools for breast cancer screenings. “We have these technologies available to us and taking full advantage of them, and taking advantage of the health care system, that we’re able to screen for breast cancer early on before you feel it.” Patients with breast implants are not protected from developing breast cancer and should still have yearly breast screenings. “I cannot stress enough, just because you have implants does not mean that you should not get screened for breast cancer,” said Dr. Handa. But how patients have a mammogram is a little different when they have breast implants. The screenings require more images and typically take twice as long to do. “In no way are our breasts protected, and in fact they can hide things, so it’s important that we take that extra time and get those extra views,” said Dr. Handa. Breast implants, whether saline or silicone, can obscure mammogram images making it difficult to see or feel breast cancer. “It does reduce our sensitivity. If you can imagine you would have to push away the implant—they’re called push back views or implant displaced views. It’s probably a little uncomfortable but still very, very important,” said Dr. Handa. Breast cancer can form underneath the implant. “It can hide in the smallest amount of breast tissue. So we will do these push back views and we can find a lot,” said Dr. Handa. Studies show breast implants do not cause or prevent breast cancer but can make it harder to find, making yearly mammograms even more important. View More Health Matters video segments at LeeHealth.org/Healthmatters/ Lee Health in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of health care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For more than 100 years, we’ve been providing our community with personalized preventative health services and primary care to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Lee Health - Caring People. Inspiring Care. Visit LeeHealth.org
Views: 2929 Lee Health
Consequences of False Positive Mammogram Results
 
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Odds are most women will get at least one false-positive mammogram, but thankfully most women who are called back for further testing of a suspicious mammogram finding do not end up having cancer after all. Subscribe to Dr. Greger’s free nutrition newsletter at https://www.nutritionfacts.org/subscribe and get a free recipe from his new HOW NOT TO DIE COOKBOOK. (All proceeds Dr. Greger receives from his books, DVDs, and speaking directly support NutritionFacts.org). You can check out my Doc Note under the first video (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/9-out-of-10-Women-misinformed-about-Mammograms) in this series to get a sense why I chose to spend so much time on this topic. This is the 5th in a 14-part series on mammograms. In case you missed the first four, here they are: • 9 out of 10 Women Misinformed about Mammograms ((http://nutritionfacts.org/video/9-out-of-10-Women-misinformed-about-Mammograms) • Mammogram Recommendations - Why the Conflicting Guidelines (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Mammogram-Recommendations-Why-the-Conflicting-Guidelines) • Should Women Get Mammograms Starting at Age 40? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Should-Women-Get-Mammograms-Starting-at-Age-40) • Do Mammograms Save Lives? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Do-Mammograms-Save-Lives) Stay tuned for: • Do Mammograms Hurt? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Do-Mammograms-Hurt) • Can Mammogram Radiation Cause Breast Cancer? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Can-Mammogram-radiation-Cause-Breast-Cancer) • Understanding the Mammogram Paradox (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Understanding-the-Mammogram-Paradox) • Overtreatment of Stage 0 Breast Cancer DCIS (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Overtreatment-of-Stage-0-Breast-Cancer-DCIS) • Women Deserve to Know the Truth About Mammograms (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Women-Deserve-to-Know-the-Truth-About-Mammograms) • Breast Cancer and the 5-Year Survival Rate Myth (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/breast-Cancer-and-the-5-Year-Survival-Rate-Myth) • Why Mammograms Don’t Appear to Save Lives (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Why-Mammograms-Don) • Why Patients Aren’t Informed About Mammograms (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Why-Patients-Arent-Informed-About-Mammograms) • The Pros and Cons of Mammograms (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/The-Pros-and-Cons-of-Mammograms) Have a question about this video? Leave it in the comment section at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/consequences-of-false-positive-mammogram-results and someone on the NutritionFacts.org team will try to answer it. Want to get a list of links to all the scientific sources used in this video? Click on Sources Cited at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/consequences-of-false-positive-mammogram-results. You’ll also find a transcript and acknowledgments for the video, my blog and speaking tour schedule, and an easy way to search (by translated language even) through our videos spanning more than 2,000 health topics. If you’d rather watch these videos on YouTube, subscribe to my YouTube Channel here: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=nutritionfactsorg Thanks for watching. I hope you’ll join in the evidence-based nutrition revolution! -Michael Greger, MD FACLM Captions for this video are available in several languages. To find yours, click on the settings wheel on the lower-right of the video and then "Subtitles/CC." http://www.NutritionFacts.org • Subscribe: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/subscribe • Donate: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/donate • HOW NOT TO DIE: http://nutritionfacts.org/book • Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NutritionFacts.org • Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nutrition_facts • Instagram: http://instagram.com/nutrition_facts_org/ • Google+: https://plus.google.com/+NutritionfactsOrgMD • Podcast : http://nutritionfacts.org/audio/
Views: 15259 NutritionFacts.org
BBC News US anchor Amy Robach finds cancer after TV mammogram
 
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Good Morning America's Amy Robach has revealed she will have a double mastectomy this week, a month after undergoing a mammogram on the show. The 40-year-old correspondent discovered she had breast cancer after reluctantly agreeing to have a screening filmed for the ABC show.
Views: 30350 Bbcworldnewslive225
Breast Cancer - Symptom, Causes & Diagnosis (Finding Earth)
 
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Breast cancer symptoms • Nipple tenderness or a lump near the breast or underarm area • A change in the skin texture of the breast • A lump in the breast that does not move and does not go away • The lump may feel hard or tender, irregular in shape • The lump is usually not painful • A change in the breast or nipple appearance • Any nipple discharge • Itching of the breast or nipple • Dimple on the breast • Swelling or shrinkage of the breast (especially one side ) • Recent asymmetry of the breasts • Redness and increased warmth of breast • Nipple that is turned slightly inward • Skin of the breast, areola, or nipple that becomes scaly, red, or swollen or may have ridges or pitting resembling the skin of an orange. Late signs and symptoms • bone pain • nausea • loss of appetite • weight loss • (pleural effusion) • headache • double vision • muscle weakness • A pain in the armpits or breast • An area of thickened tissue in a breast CAUSES: 1) Age 2) Genetics 3) Breast cancer history 4) Breast lumps 5) Density of breast 6) Exposure to estrogen 8) Height 10) Radiation exposure 11) HRT (hormone replacement therapy) 12) Certain jobs Using Contraceptive pill Alcohol consumption Obesity Diagnosis Mammogram Ultrasound MRI Biopsy biopsy procedures include Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) Core Needle Biopsy (CNB) Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy (SLN) Digital Tomosynthesis
Views: 97611 Finding Earth
The Doctor Is In: Mammograms, Results and Breast Cancer
 
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Scot Ackerman, MD discusses mammogram screenings and results, including that 2-4 screening mammograms of 1000 lead to a cancer diagnosis. First Coast Living, October 12, 2012
Do Mammograms Hurt?
 
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Excessive breast compression during mammography may not improve image quality and cause unnecessary pain. Subscribe to Dr. Greger’s free nutrition newsletter at https://www.nutritionfacts.org/subscribe and get a free recipe from his new HOW NOT TO DIE COOKBOOK. (All proceeds Dr. Greger receives from his books, DVDs, and speaking directly support NutritionFacts.org). I started talking about false-positives. That was the topic of my last video. This is the 6th in a 14-video series on mammograms. If you missed the first 5, check them out: • 9 out of 10 Women Misinformed about Mammograms ((http://nutritionfacts.org/video/9-out-of-10-Women-misinformed-about-Mammograms) • Mammogram Recommendations - Why the Conflicting Guidelines (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Mammogram-Recommendations-Why-the-Conflicting-Guidelines) • Should Women Get Mammograms Starting at Age 40? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Should-Women-Get-Mammograms-Starting-at-Age-40) • Do Mammograms Save Lives? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Do-Mammograms-Save-Lives) • Consequences of False-Positive Mammogram Results (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Consequences-of-False-Positive-Mammogram-Results) Stay tuned for: • Can Mammogram Radiation Cause Breast Cancer? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Can-Mammogram-radiation-Cause-Breast-Cancer) • Understanding the Mammogram Paradox (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Understanding-the-Mammogram-Paradox) • Overtreatment of Stage 0 Breast Cancer DCIS (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Overtreatment-of-Stage-0-Breast-Cancer-DCIS) • Women Deserve to Know the Truth About Mammograms (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Women-Deserve-to-Know-the-Truth-About-Mammograms) • Breast Cancer and the 5-Year Survival Rate Myth (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/breast-Cancer-and-the-5-Year-Survival-Rate-Myth) • Why Mammograms Don’t Appear to Save Lives (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Why-Mammograms-Don) • Why Patients Aren’t Informed About Mammograms (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Why-Patients-Arent-Informed-About-Mammograms) • The Pros and Cons of Mammograms (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/The-Pros-and-Cons-of-Mammograms) Have a question about this video? Leave it in the comment section at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/do-mammograms-hurt and someone on the NutritionFacts.org team will try to answer it. Want to get a list of links to all the scientific sources used in this video? Click on Sources Cited at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/do-mammograms-hurt. You’ll also find a transcript and acknowledgments for the video, my blog and speaking tour schedule, and an easy way to search (by translated language even) through our videos spanning more than 2,000 health topics. If you’d rather watch these videos on YouTube, subscribe to my YouTube Channel here: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=nutritionfactsorg Thanks for watching. I hope you’ll join in the evidence-based nutrition revolution! -Michael Greger, MD FACLM Captions for this video are available in several languages. To find yours, click on the settings wheel on the lower-right of the video and then "Subtitles/CC." http://www.NutritionFacts.org • Subscribe: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/subscribe • Donate: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/donate • HOW NOT TO DIE: http://nutritionfacts.org/book • Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NutritionFacts.org • Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nutrition_facts • Instagram: http://instagram.com/nutrition_facts_org/ • Google+: https://plus.google.com/+NutritionfactsOrgMD • Podcast : http://nutritionfacts.org/audio/
Views: 25129 NutritionFacts.org
Screening Mammograms: When Do I Start Getting Them?
 
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Learn when to begin screening mammography. Guidelines have recently changed and this has created confusion for women and physicians. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ _____________________________________ Questions for your Primary Care Physician: 1. Am I at a High Risk for breast cancer in my lifetime? 2. Should I start mammograms at 40, 45 or 50? 3. What are the downsides to screening mammography? How “Screening Mammograms” save lives Annual screening mammograms often detect small breast cancers before you may notice them yourself. “Breast screening” can save lives by finding cancers when they are smaller and easier to cure. Mammograms account for much of the improved survival from breast cancer over the last 30 years. Until recently, most guidelines have recommended beginning annual screening mammograms at the age of 40. At what age should I begin screening? Screening guidelines are currently evolving towards screening less women in their 40s. These newer guidelines recommend beginning mammography at age 45 or 50. Some suggest every other year rather than every year. The new guidelines have not been widely adopted and are quite controversial and confusing. The Breast Cancer School for Patients recommends continuing annual screening mammograms for women age 40 and older. We provide an overview of both the wisdom and risks of these controversial recommendations. Consult with your physician to see what mammographic screening program will suit your unique situation. Guidelines now encourage screening later. Why? The American Cancer Society and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force now recommend delaying annual screening mammography until 45 or 50 years old. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists continue to recommend beginning at 40 years of age and annually thereafter. These new guidelines have created confusion for both physicians and women. As currently written, they have been impossible to implement by medical communities across the country. There is also disagreement amongst physician, patient advocacy and breast cancer organizations. What are the risks of annual mammograms? Screening for breast cancer is a balance between benefits (saves lives) and risks (cost, radiation, biopsies, stress). There are distinct risks to mammographic screening. The newer guidelines are based upon re-evaluations of these risks and benefits. Risks of screening: *Being “called back” for more imaging and nothing is found *Most breast biopsies prove to be benign *Radiation to the breasts from a mammogram *The “stress & anxiety” when something is detected, but is not a cancer *The monetary cost to you, insurance, and society *Some cancers would have been cured anyway, without screening Make informed screening decisions All “guidelines” should be used as a starting point for making health care decisions. Make decisions about breast screening with your physicians. One benefit is that the new guidelines have encouraged women to educate themselves and engage their physicians about their personal risk for breast cancer. One key component of screening is determining if you are at an increased lifetime risk for developing breast cancer. Such “High Risk” women should be more aggressive with breast screening. Seeing a breast surgeon is the best way to determine if you are at an increased risk for breast cancer. Your goal should be to develop a “tailor-made” breast screening approach that fits your unique situation. Patient-Friendly References: www.breastscreeningdecisions.org This website helps women ages 40 – 49 make decisions about when to start and how often to get screening mammograms. This “Mammogram Decision Aid” (here) was developed by Weill Cornell Medical College. www.komen.org This page (here) on “Breast Cancer Screening for Women at Average Risk” is excellent and covers all the guidelines in easy to understand terms. The Susan G. Komen organization is a leading advocacy group dedicated to assisting patients, funding research and ensuring quality breast cancer care. www.jamanetwork.com This JAMA Patient Page on “Breast Cancer Screening in the United States” (here) outlines both major guidelines and is good summary of the current recommendations. The Journal of the American Medical Association is a network of publications from the American Medical Association. www.cancer.gov Their “Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ)-Patient Version” (here) is an easy to read document on the details of breast screening. It does not deal specifically with the new screening guidelines. The National Cancer Institute is a governmental agency that is dedicated to distributing information to the public about cancer and cancer research trials.