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Central Florida Cancer Institute Hope Center Groundbreaking Ceremony in Davenport, Florida
 
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Groundbreaking Ceremony for Central Florida Cancer Institute's Hope Center in Davenport, Florida
Views: 490 CFCancerInstitute
Central Florida Cancer Care Center
 
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Breast Cancer Video with Dr. Steven G. Lester and Dr. Maneesh Gossain
Views: 209 CFCCCRadiation
Central Florida Cancer Care Center
 
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Prostate Cancer Video with Dr. Steven G. Lester and Dr. Maneesh Gossain
Views: 194 CFCCCRadiation
Central Florida cancer patients get makeovers
 
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Local cancer patients were surprised to see the results of their unexpected, free makeovers. WESH 2 Photojournalist Pete Delis was there for the emotional outcomes. Subscribe to WESH on YouTube now for more: http://bit.ly/1dqr14j Get more Orlando news: http://wesh.com Like us:http://facebook.com/wesh2news Follow us: http://twitter.com/wesh Google+: http://plus.google.com/+wesh
Views: 44 WESH 2 News
Florida Cancer Specialists - Orlando Locations - TV Commercial V3
 
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With 10 locations in Central Florida, Florida Cancer Specialists have world class cancer centers close to home. You will find the most advanced and personalized care available without getting on a plane or taking a road trip.
Can I Get Too Much Radiation?
 
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Can I get too much radiation? In this brief video, Steven G. Lester, M.D., explains more about radiation treatments at Central Florida Cancer Care Center. “One of the common questions we get is “am I going to get too much radiation?,” says Stephen G. Lester, M.D., F.A.C.R.O., a board-certified radiation oncologist at The Central Florida Cancer Care Center. “Most patients understand that radiation can have an unsafe level of exposure. What patients don’t realize is that low levels of radiation are probably not harmful. For example, people who live in Denver versus living at sea level get more background radiation, as do pilots, and there have not been any reports of excessive cancers from those people.” “We’re only going to give you the radiation you need to get. And radiation whether from a mammogram or a therapeutic might cause a second cancer, and we’ve all seen that. But we know the benefit outweighs that risk. Our goal is to treat you and follow you with the lowest amount of radiation that is possible. The radiation after the machine is off is gone. There is no risk of harm to your children or any loved ones.” “We try to keep everything down to a minimum - we want to do what’s best for you, and extremely low doses of radiation probably do not cause any harm as far as we know.” For more visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/ To learn more about Dr. Lester visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/steven-lester/ To learn about the different types of radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/what-are-the-different-types-of-radiation-therapy/ For commonly asked questions visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/faq/ For more cancer information resources visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/cancer-information/
Florida Cancer Specialists Ribbon cutting Ceremony - October, 2012
 
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Watch Mayor Bob Buckhorn cut the ribbon officiating the opening of this brand new state of the art medical facility. Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute is the largest independent oncology/hematology practice in the United States. With their newest facility located right here in Tampa at 3402 W. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Blvd. (33607), Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute serves patients as far north as Tallahassee, on the Gulf Coast from Tampa to Naples, and as far east as the Orlando area in Central Florida. Their primary purpose -- and passion -- is to provide the most advanced cancer treatment, using cutting-edge technologies, in a setting where patients can be close to home and surrounded by family and friends. City of Tampa Television, www.tampagov.net/CTTV
Views: 794 CityofTampa
UF Health Cancer Center - Orlando Health Proton Accelerator Delivery
 
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November 2nd 2014: Mevion Medical Systems is announcing the delivery of its MEVION S250 proton therapy superconducting synchrocyclotron accelerator to the University of Florida Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health. The accelerator delivery is a major milestone in the construction of the center’s new proton beam therapy system, which will treat cancer in adults and children. Proton therapy precisely delivers radiation doses to tumors while sparing much of the surrounding healthy tissue, thus making it ideal for treating pediatric patients, as well as adult cancers in sensitive locations such as near the heart or brain. As Central Florida’s most advanced cancer center, the University of Florida Health Cancer Center is the first hospital in the region to install a proton therapy system. Installation of the accelerator will take just a few days, and construction of the proton center is expected to be completed next year.
What is Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT)? | Steven G. Lester, M.D.
 
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What is image-guided radiation therapy? In this short video, Steven G. Lester, M.D., FACRO at Central Florida Cancer Care Center, explains what Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) is and why it's beneficial to patients. Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is a type of conformal radiotherapy that allows higher doses of radiation to be given to the tumor while limiting the impact on healthy tissue. The method uses advanced imaging technology before and during radiation therapy to enhance the precision and accuracy of treatment delivery. “Patients often ask us what image-guided radiation therapy is,” says Dr. Lester. “We use IGRT to be more precise on a daily basis because what we’ve learned over the last twenty years is that there’s more organ motion than many patients and physicians realize.” How is Image Guided Radiation Therapy Used? Precise tumor locations can shift as a result of normal, subtle movements in the body due to breathing, bladder, and bowel function. Image-guided radiation treats tumors situated on or near vital bodily structures prone to movement including the lungs, liver, and prostate. “Organ motion is due basically to your breathing and the normal displacement of tissue,” explains Dr. Lester. “Take your prostate, for example. If your rectum is full (of volume), your prostate is going to move in a different direction than when it’s empty. You can be as still as you want (during treatment) but we need to account for those internal motions.” IGRT is often used alongside intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), a method of advanced-precision radiotherapy that uses computer-driven x-rays to carry targeted radiation to a malignant tumor. Before IGRT, doctors had to treat a larger area of the body just to be sure the cancer tumor was receiving the needed radiation. The expanded treatment area meant more damage to the surrounding healthy tissues. “Before IGRT, the way we had to account for organ motion was with a bigger margin, treating more tissue,” says Dr. Lester. “IGRT allows us to precisely localize where the cancer and the normal tissue is right before treatment, so we’re able to treat a smaller volume.” What Are the Advantages of IGRT? Radiation therapy machines are equipped with imaging technology to allow your doctor to image the tumor before and during treatment. The images show the size, shape, and position of cancer as well as the surrounding tissues and bones. This can help: Deliver accurate doses of radiation Define, localize, and monitor tumor position, size, and shape before and during treatment Determine the possibility of greater and more precise radiation to enhance tumor control Lower the radiation exposure of healthy tissues around the tumor “Image guidance assists us in giving patients the most precise treatment possible,” says Dr. Lester. “Now we’re able to treat a smaller area, which we hope creates fewer side effects and allows us to be just as effective but with less normal tissue being affected.” A radiation oncologist puts together a patient’s treatment plan through a planning process, called a simulation session. Other imaging procedures might be used to determine the exact shape and location of the tumor further, and then the patient may be secured in place to help them stay in the correct position throughout the treatment. Ultimately, state-of-the-art SmartBeam IMRT technology gives hope to cancer patients who would have been deemed untreatable just a generation ago. “The goal of image guidance is to assist us in giving you the most precise treatment possible,” says Dr. Lester. Today, IMRT is employed to treat prostate, head and neck, breast, thyroid, and lung cancer, as well as tumors in the liver and brain, lymphomas, and sarcomas. For more visit http://cancercarecenter.md/ To learn more about Dr. Lester visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/steven-lester/ To learn more about image guided radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/imrt-igrt/
The Importance of IMRT/IGRT in Treating Prostate Cancer
 
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The importance of IMRT/IGRT in treating prostate cancer. In this short video, Steven G. Lester, M.D., F.A.C.R.O., a board-certified radiation oncologist, at Central Florida Cancer Care Center describes technological advancements in treating prostate cancer and why you need IMRT/IGRT when treating the disease. “Today we're going to discuss the importance of utilizing an IMRT/IGRT technique in treating prostate cancer if you elect to have radiation,” says Dr. Lester. “In the past, before the technology improved, we had to take about a two centimeter (roughly one inch) margin around the prostate to make sure we didn't miss it. The reason we might have missed it is that the prostates move all day. They don't move much, but they do move because your rectum is behind your prostate. If your rectum is distended with stool or gas, it is going to push it in one direction. If it's empty, it is going to drop in the other direction.” “(In the past) We also tried to treat you with your bladder full. It’s harder to distend your bladder the same amount each day just by drinking fluid, so we had to worry about a shift in that direction. And finally, by tradition, with radiation you have to start with landmarks, which are on the belly, and bellies wiggle. The larger the patient, the more likely you're not going to have your aim on because you're using skin tattoos that are wiggling around.” “Once we developed image-guided radiation, it allowed us to visualize the prostate every day. Since then, we have been able to cut those margins from two centimeters to point five centimeters. That lets us treat a lot less healthy tissue, helps us ensure we're hitting the target, and it has allowed us to put in a higher dose of radiation, which has resulted in longer, better term, local control, which hopefully will translate to cures.” “When you see that you're going through a lot each day with regards to filming, aiming, and treatment going and coming from five to nine directions, it’s perfectly normal. The whole process is designed to sculpt the dose of radiation and to paint it just to the prostate and treat less bladder, less rectum, less hip and give you a better cure rate with fewer side effects.” “There is a lot of technology involved with prostate radiation, and it takes awhile to get started. It's important you work with your doctor and his entire team to make sure your treatment is done properly. It's critically important to reduce the side effects and improve the cure rate; therefore, you want IMRT/IGRT when you get your prostate irradiated.” For more visit http://cancercarecenter.md/ To learn more about Dr. Lester visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/steven-lester/ To learn more about prostate cancer visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/prostate-cancer/ For patient resources visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/resources-and-links/ To learn more about external beam radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/external-beam-radiation-therapy/ To learn more about internal beam radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/internal-radiation-therapy/ To learn more about image-guided radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/imrt-igrt/
What Is the Difference Between Private vs. Hospital-Owned Oncology?.
 
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What is the difference between private vs. hospital-owned oncology? In this short video, Richard J. Lee, M.D., radiation oncologist at Central Florida Cancer Care Center, discusses the benefits of patients choosing a private radiation oncology practice instead of the hospital-owned alternative. "Our practice is one of the few independent radiation oncology groups” says Dr. Lee. “You’re seeing on a national level that many hospital systems and multi-disciplinary practices are buying out the radiation oncology groups. The nice thing about our practice is that we are completely independent. We are owned only by radiation oncologists and, therefore, we are only beholden to ourselves. We have the autonomy to decide which patients require treatment vs. having upward pressures from other doctors and other hospitals telling us to treat certain patients for business purposes or other reasons.” “We take great pride in the fact that we are one of the few independent practices left. In our practice, we are able to give the patient that much more time and attention. Being a smaller group, we have the same staff that patients will see every day that they’ll be able to build a relationship with. And that’s what medicine should be about. Some of that can get lost as we get into the bigger hospital systems.” For more visit http://cancercarecenter.md/ To learn more about Dr. Lee visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/richard-lee/ To learn about the different types of radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/what-are-the-different-types-of-radiation-therapy/ For commonly asked questions visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/faq/ For more cancer information resources visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/cancer-information/
Florida Doctor Using Alternative Cancer Treatment to Battle Stage 4 Cancer
 
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Dr. Mark Rosenberg, a physician in South Florida is working on a new treatment protocol for patients battling late stage cancer. Channel 10 speaks with Dr. Rosenberg's patient Mary Nesbitt, who is now in remission from edometrial cancer. Mary's cancer is now in remission.
Important Delivery to Orlando Health’s Proton Therapy Center
 
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Orlando Health is moving a very important step closer to bringing revolutionary new cancer treatment to Central Florida. On November 1, 2014, the MEVION S250 superconducting synchrocyclotron proton accelerator was delivered to the Orlando Health construction site of the new Proton Therapy Center along Orange Avenue. But this was no ordinary delivery. The accelerator weighs 58 tons (that’s the equivalent of 7 fully grown African elephants) and was lifted from a flatbed truck by a 600-ton crane and carefully placed into the proton center’s vault through a hatch in the ceiling. This proton beam cyclotron accelerator that arrived at Orlando Health is one of only six in the entire world. Orlando Health’s multi-million dollar facility will house Central Florida’s first proton therapy center and will provide cancer patients with a form of radiation therapy that uses proton beams. Proton therapy is capable of more focused radiation delivery than current radiation treatment. Treating tumors using proton therapy delivers a lower dose of radiation to surrounding normal tissue, which results in fewer side effects, especially for pediatric patients. Traditionally, proton therapy has been used for brain and spine tumors, which are often located near vital organs, but it is also used for a wide variety of cancers including breast, lung, prostate, gastrointestinal, and cancers of the head and neck. Building a proton therapy center is a complicated process. Orlando Health’s 15,000 square foot Proton Therapy Center once completed will consist of three floors – two above ground and one underground – in order to accommodate the revolutionary gantry design of the MEVION S250. As with the first delivery in the fall of 2013, this delivery included heavy parts transported on multiple semi-trucks all the way from Mevion’s headquarters in Boston, MA. Once completely assembled, the entire compact proton therapy system weighs 100 tons which is equivalent to the weight of a fully loaded Boeing 757 airplane. Interestingly, this system is just a fraction of the weight of other proton therapy systems that rely on older technologies. It is expected that Orlando Health will begin treating patients at the Proton Therapy Center in early-2016 and potentially treat up to 30 patients a day. Orlando Health will join an elite group of centers around the world to offer proton therapy as to date there are only 32 proton therapy centers worldwide and just 15 centers operating in the United States. For more information about proton therapy, visit www.orlandohealth.com.
Views: 1016 Orlando Health
Sandra J. Sha, MD, Named the Best Oncologist in Florida
 
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Sandra J. Sha, MD, Watson Clinic Cancer Center, cancer, florida, Radiation Oncologist, oncology, women's health, breast cancer treatment, research, gynecologic, AccuBoost, Harvard
Views: 105 Worldwidemembervids
Florida Cancer Specialists - Orlando Locations TV Commercial - V4
 
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With 10 locations in Central Florida, Florida Cancer Specialists have world class cancer centers close to home. You will find the most advanced and personalized care available without getting on a plane or taking a road trip.
I choose – Orlando Health – UF Health Cancer Center
 
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Choose top doctors, the latests research & treatments. The only cancer center of excellence in the area.
Views: 218 Orlando Health
Florida Cancer Specialists - Orlando Locations - TV Commercial V1
 
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With 10 locations in Central Florida, Florida Cancer Specialists have world class cancer centers close to home. You will find the most advanced and personalized care available without getting on a plane or taking a road trip.
Skin Cancer Center of Central Florida
 
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http://www.dexknows.com/business_profiles/skin_cancer_center_of_central_florida-b71714 At the Skin Cancer Center of Central Florida, were dedicated to helping our patients deal with skin cancer. There are many types of skin cancer, and we treat them all, including basal cell cancer, squamous cell cancer and melanoma. Come to our state of the art facility, where we strive to make you as comfortable as possible.
Views: 15 dexknowsvideo30
How to Prevent Prostate Cancer
 
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How to prevent prostate cancer. In this video, Steven G. Lester, M.D., F.A.C.R.O., a board-certified radiation oncologist, at Central Florida Cancer Care Center discusses what, if anything, can be done to prevent the disease. “Today, we're discussing prostate cancer prevention,” says Dr. Lester. “We get a lot of questions about that, especially from family members when they come in and Dad has been diagnosed with prostate cancer.” “Unfortunately, we don't have a pill we can give you to prevent prostate cancer. There have been several studies that have looked at some of the medications used for enlarged prostates to see if they would reduce the risk of prostate cancer. And they haven’t been proven to be effective enough.” “I think when one deals with prostate cancer prevention, what we would like to do at this point since we can't prevent it, is to prevent high-risk prostate cancer, the more aggressive prostate cancer. And there is some data that certain lifestyle and dietary modifications may be able to accomplish that. The data is based on looking at people from other cultures who have moved to our country and changed their diet. When those people adopted a higher fat diet with fewer soybeans, they seem to have more aggressive prostate cancer.” “Therefore, a lot of what you would consider a heart-healthy diet is also good for reducing the risk of high-risk prostate cancer. That's the best we can do at this time. We encourage patients to follow a low saturated fat diet. We'd like them to incorporate some omega-3s into their diet by eating fish. We would say eating more tomatoes is beneficial because of the lycopene. Eating some soybean protein is important. Some data indicates that drinking some freshly brewed tea every day may help.” “When patients hear about the research, they always want to know how much they should eat, and we don't really know how much. The idea is to work it into your diet. If you enjoy the food product, make sure you eat it. If you don't, you can try some different supplements to get the more beneficial proteins out of soybean.” “Another factor that probably helps is losing weight. We've noticed that patients with higher body mass index seem to have more prostate cancer when they have their prostates removed. So the idea here is to reduce your weight, and that may help by reducing fats in the diet and getting better blood sugar control. There's some data that tighter blood sugar control may benefit patients with prostate cancer. Another variable that may or may not affect prostate cancer is a lower vitamin D level. We think it's important to get your vitamin D level checked and increase vitamin D in your diet or through supplements. If you take it through supplements, make sure you take it with a meal as it doesn't absorb well on an empty stomach. Exercise helps. And reducing stress. There is some data that patients with sleep apnea potentially have more cancers, and we encourage our patients who have sleep apnea to use their CPAP.” For more visit http://cancercarecenter.md/ To learn more about Dr. Lester visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/steven-lester/ To learn more about prostate cancer visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/prostate-cancer/ For patient resources visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/resources-and-links/ To learn more about external beam radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/external-beam-radiation-therapy/ To learn more about internal beam radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/internal-radiation-therapy/ To learn more about image-guided radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/imrt-igrt/
Dr. Ralph Gousse Receives 2015 Florida Cancer Specialists Humanitarian Award
 
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Dr. Ralph Gousse, who practices at several locations in Central Florida, was honored by Florida Cancer Specialists for his work in Haiti. Since 2003, Dr. Gousse has provided free medical care, education and housing assistance to needy families in Haiti.
Florida Cancer Specialists Our Heroes Commercial
 
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Florida Cancer Specialists Our Heroes - Aired during 2010 Winter Olympics.
Thoracic Oncology Program at Moffitt Cancer Center
 
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Numerous physicians entrust their patients to the Thoracic Oncology Program at Moffitt Cancer Center. Dedicated to providing accurate diagnoses and comprehensive treatment services, Moffitt is a trusted name in Thoracic oncology and has been listed among "America’s Best Hospitals" for cancer by U.S. News & World Report. We work closely with referring physicians to provide the best possible care for patients of all ages.
What Are the Side Effects of Radiation Oncology?
 
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What are the side-effects of radiation oncology? Maneesh Gossain, MD, a board-certified radiation oncologist at Central Florida Cancer Care Center shares his insights on the different types of radiation therapy used and what kinds of side-effects can be associated with them. “Some of the common questions I get from patients are ‘Are there side-effects to radiation?’ and ‘What are the side-effects?’” says Dr. Gossain. “There are side-effects for the different kinds of cancers. However, we can minimize those, and it all depends on the volume of tumor that we are treating.” “We commonly treat skin cancers, breast cancers, prostate cancers, and lung cancers. Those side-effects are all going to be different, and it’s important that you sit down with your doctor to discuss those side-effects. Skin cancer tends to be the easiest (to treat). We have a very small area and use a superficial electron beam that can control the depth of radiation. It will give you a skin reaction and occasionally fatigue. These are acute reactions that disappear once the radiation is completed.” For breast cancer, we get skin reaction and fatigue,” Dr. Gossain continues.”On the left side, we have to be concerned about the heart and the (blood) vessels, so we take care to avoid those. For lung cancer, it can be a little bit more complicated. There are peripheral lung cancers and centrally-located lung cancers. We are concerned about your esophagus and spinal cord. And with prostate cancer, you can get urethritis (inflammation of the urethra) and proctitis (inflammation of the rectum and anus) as we’re avoiding the bladder and rectum. According to Dr. Gossain, many people misunderstand the potential side effects of radiation oncology, making a consultation with their physician essential for obtaining clear insight. “There are common misconceptions that people get nausea, vomiting, lose their hair and teeth with radiation,” he says. “But these are often untrue, and it’s important to sit down with your physician to review your images, pathology reports, and discuss all side-effects with you.” To learn more about Dr. Gossain visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/maneesh-gossain/ To learn more about Central Florida Cancer Care Center visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/ For patient resources and links visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/resources-and-links/ To learn more about procedures and equipment visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/procedures-equipment/
Orlando Prostate Cancer | Orlando, FL | (407) 584-7771
 
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http://www.orlandoprostatecancer.com | Orlando Prostate Cancer | Orlando, FL | (407) 584-7771 Richard R. Lotenfoe, MD, is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and Board Certified Urological Surgeon in Orlando, Florida. He specializes in the treatment of prostate cancer using the HIFU procedure. Contact us today to discuss our health solutions. Urology Health Solutions 410 Celebration Place Suite 203 Celebration, FL 34747 (407) 584-7771 http://www.orlandoprostatecancer.com/
Views: 797 Richard Lotenfoe
New pairing creates UF Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health
 
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Orlando Health and University of Florida Health today announced they have joined forces to establish one of the state's largest, most comprehensive cancer programs. The UF Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health will expand care and treatment options for patients throughout the region, at a time when statistics show the number of cancer cases in Florida is rising. According to recent studies by the National Cancer Institute, Florida now has the second-largest cancer burden in America, and cancer has surpassed heart disease as the leading cause of death in the Sunshine State. "A need of this magnitude requires an innovative strategy for meeting this growing demand for cancer treatment and care," said Orlando Health Board Chair Dianna Morgan. "By connecting some of the nation's most experienced cancer doctors and leading cancer researchers, we can collaborate to provide the best possible care and the most favorable treatment outcomes for cancer patients." The program officially begins Jan. 31, when Orlando Health's affiliation agreement with the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center expires. Orlando patients will continue to receive their cancer care with the same Orlando Health physicians, oncologists, surgeons and staff they have come to know and trust. In addition, patients also will have more options for leading-edge treatment and expanded access to additional specialists, new drugs, clinical trials and other resources. The program also provides greater flexibility by offering care at community medical facilities closer to patients' homes, whether in the Orlando or Gainesville areas. "This is an important new step for cancer treatment in Florida," said UF President Bernie Machen. "By connecting our university's research and treatment expertise with the exceptional health care organization that is Orlando Health, we bolster our capacity to improve patient care and outcomes." Mark Roh, MD will be president of the UF Health Cancer Center at Orlando Health. He is currently president of MD Anderson-Orlando. "The medical staff and faculty in Orlando and Gainesville are excited to be working together to expand cancer treatments and services for our patients. This will revolutionize cancer care for patients throughout Florida," Roh said.
Views: 285 UFHealth
Our Story - Central Florida Vein & Vascular Center
 
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http://cfvein.com/ This video is an introduction to the Central Florida Vein and Vascular Center, a practice that specializes in the treatment of varicose veins, spider veins and other venous related disorders. The practice was started more than a decade ago by Dr. John D. Horowitz, a Board Certified, Fellowship Trained Vascular Surgeon with more than 25 years of experience in his field.
Will I Be Radioactive Following Treatment?
 
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Will I be radioactive following treatment? In this short video, Richard J. Lee, M.D., radiation oncologist at Central Florida Cancer Care Center, answers whether you will be radioactive following treatment for cancer. “A question many patients ask is ‘will I be radioactive after being treated?’ or ‘will I be able to be around my grandkids or small animals?’ says Dr. Lee. “The answer is if we are treating you with external beam radiation therapy, which is typically what you think of when you talk about radiation therapy, you are only radioactive, you’re only getting radiation during the time that you are in the room with the treatment machine. But after that, you will not be radioactive, and you will not be at risk of spreading any radioactivity to anyone else.” “There are a few specific radiation treatments that require an implant, a radioactive seed. In those situations, we would recommend that you limit your visits with other people, small children, and small animals. In general, you will not be radioactive and should be able to continue all of your daily activities.” For more visit http://cancercarecenter.md/ To learn more about Dr. Lee visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/richard-lee/ To learn about the different types of radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/what-are-the-different-types-of-radiation-therapy/ For commonly asked questions visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/faq/ For more cancer information resources visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/cancer-information/
Planning for Prostate Cancer Treatment
 
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Planning for prostate cancer treatment. In this short video, Steven G. Lester, M.D., F.A.C.R.O., a board-certified radiation oncologist, at Central Florida Cancer Care Center describes how prostate cancer patients can plan for radiation treatment. “Today we're discussing prostate cancer and radiation treatments in the planning component,” says Dr. Lester. “Many patients come in, and they have a lot of anxiety. However, all that anxiety isn’t really necessary with prostate cancer.” “Most patients want to get started right away, and they get a little disappointed when I say that won’t be the case. The reason for that is that we have a lot of technology and planning that goes into treating prostate cancer. For us to do image guidance, we place three little metal markers in your prostate which is utilized to see (on X-ray) where your prostate is on a daily basis, because you can't see a prostate on a standard X-ray.” “After we decide, with your input, that you want to be treated, we have to place these markers (in your prostate). Once the markers are placed, we usually do a CAT scan and often an MRI to fuse the images so we can see exactly where your prostate is. Then we have to undergo a planning process with the treatment planning computer which customizes the treatment to your anatomy.” “Once we've got the plan approved, we do a phantom treatment on the machine to make sure the computer got all the calculations correct. Then we bring you back and film you on the machine to make sure it lines up. As you can see, it takes a good seven to fourteen days to complete all the processes that are needed to make sure your treatment is accurate, precise and customized for you. That's what goes on behind the scenes with your planning and treatment, and that's why it takes about two weeks to get started.” For more visit http://cancercarecenter.md/ To learn more about Dr. Lester visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/steven-lester/ To learn more about prostate cancer visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/prostate-cancer/ For patient resources visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/resources-and-links/ To learn more about external beam radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/external-beam-radiation-therapy/ To learn more about internal beam radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/internal-radiation-therapy/ To learn more about image-guided radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/imrt-igrt/
Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center Virtual Tour
 
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Experience the Center by taking a virtual tour of our clinical care building. "Walk" through our facilities to learn more about services and programs. Prepare for your first visit with this step-by-step guide.
Views: 25377 Johns Hopkins Medicine
The Florida Orchestra Returns to Moffitt Cancer Center
 
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The Florida Orchestra, under the direction of Michael Francis, returns to Moffitt Cancer Center’s Stabile Research Building to perform once again for patients and team members. The Florida Orchestra performed “The Lark Ascending” by Ralph Vaughan Williams and spotlighted the virtuosic skill of Concertmaster Jeffrey Multer on violin.
Dr. Duff Sprawls welcomes you to Space Coast Cancer Center
 
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Dr. Duff Sprawls welcomes you to Space Coast Cancer Center in Viera, Florida. The staff will treat you like family while providing you with state-of-the-art cancer care within 30 minutes of where you live in Brevard County, Florida.
Views: 752 SpaceCoastCC
What is Radiation Oncology?
 
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What is radiation oncology? In this short video, Steven G. Lester, M.D., F.A.C.R.O., a board-certified radiation oncologist, at Central Florida Cancer Care Center describes the history of radiation oncology and how it has evolved and advanced over the years. “Patients often ask what is radiation oncology?” says Dr. Lester. “Radiation oncology is a specialty inside of medicine that requires a minimum of four and now five years of post-medical school study, and we are all board-certified. We use radiation to treat cancer. It’s probably the most effective thing to treat cancer when you deal with invasive, infiltrated malignancies and that we go from head to toe with what we do.” “The use of radiation is rather new in medicine,” Dr. Lester continues. “Radiation wasn’t really discovered until the late 1800s, and immediately physicians started trying to treat cancers with it. I was at the White House recently and saw a picture of Calvin Coolidge with Madame Curie, which was just amazing. She, as you know, found uranium, radium, and the initial properties with radiation.” “And that process has been refined over the years. Since I started doing this thirty-four years ago, the computerization and technology have allowed us to go from standard hand blocking where we shape the field with simple blocks to complex blades built into the head of the machine to allow us to generate a beam and shape it in any direction we want.” “Our goal is to know the history of the malignancy, know what is the best treatment for you, and coordinate it with your other physicians who may be performing surgery or giving chemotherapy. Radiation oncology is a broad specialty when it comes to oncology because oncology is a broad area. But it allows us to treat many patients and cure many effectively.” “If you want to see more information on this, please look at the rest of our website, and we’ll refer you to the appropriate places to see things about radiation oncology.” For more visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/ To learn more about Dr. Lester visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/steven-lester/ To learn about the different types of radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/what-are-the-different-types-of-radiation-therapy/ For commonly asked questions visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/faq/ For more cancer information resources visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/cancer-information/
Get to Know Maneesh Gossain, M.D.
 
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Get to know Maneesh Gossain, M.D., a board-certified radiation oncologist at Central Florida Cancer Care Center. “I got into medicine based on the influence from my family members,” says Dr. Gossain..”My dad was an endocrinologist. I saw growing up, I admired how he took care of patients. He would be stopped outside and people would thank him for all the great work that he did.” “The most difficult thing was picking a specialty,” Dr. Gossain continues..”I have six or seven family members who are physicians so everybody came from different backgrounds and specialties. I studied chemical engineering and was very interested in physics, spreadsheets, and mathematics. Radiation oncology encompassed both treating cancer patients who need help and physics and calculations.” At the end of the day, the important thing for Dr. Gossain is to use his background to help patients, educate them and treat their cancers effectively. Dr. Gossain, grew up in East Lansing, Michigan. He received his undergraduate degree in Chemical Engineering at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. After working in Silicon Valley as an engineer, Dr. Gossain went on to pursue his medical degree from Wayne State University Medical School in Detroit, Michigan. Dr. Gossain completed his internship in internal medicine at Loyola University in Maywood, Illinois, followed by his radiation oncology residency training at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, Minnesota. While in residency, Dr. Gossain did research investigating the placement of specialized markers to facilitate treatment of gynecologic cancers. “I grew up in Michigan and trained in Chicago and Minnesota,” says Dr. Gossain. “By the end of that time, I was very cold, and wanted to establish myself in a warmer climate (smiles). I had a friend in Central Florida and joined him in his practice and I really enjoy living here.” An avid sports enthusiast, Dr. Gossain now enjoys golf and the odd ping-pong tournament at the office. “Growing up, we had a lot of boys in the family so I played a lot of sports, tennis, basketball, and ping-pong,” he says. “We put a ping-pong table in the office and try to play whenever we have a break.” To learn more about Dr. Gossain visit: https://www.cancercarecenter.md/maneesh-gossain/ To learn more about Central Florida Cancer Care Center visit: https://www.cancercarecenter.md/ To learn about the different types of radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/what-are-the-different-types-of-radiation-therapy/ For commonly asked questions visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/faq/ For more cancer information resources visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/cancer-information/
Mid Florida Cancer Centers Are Conviently Located In Central Florida
 
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Our cancer treatment centers are established in 4 convenient locations to include Orange City, Deland, Sanford, and Oviedo. We are always available to talk with you and address your concerns. Please feel free to contact us during the regular business hours through one of our office phone numbers or e-mail addresses. After hours, you may contact us through our answering service. If you are looking to find more information about our cancer centers, please visit http://midfloridacancercenters.com/cancer-treatment-centers.html
What Are the Different Types of Radiation Therapy?
 
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What are the different types of radiation therapy? In this short video, Steven G. Lester, M.D., the different types of radiation available to patients at Central Florida Cancer Care Center. Radiation oncology uses streams of high-energy particles or waves, such as x-rays or electrons to shrink tumors and destroy cancer cells. Roughly half of all cancer patients receive some type of radiation therapy at one point during the term of their treatment. Steven G. Lester, M.D., FACRO, says questions about the types of radiation oncology are common among his patients. “Radiation has evolved from being cobalt-60 sources, which is a radioactive element in the head of a treatment machine, to now having high-energy linear accelerators,” he explains. “Proton beams are another form of radiation we employ.” The most appropriate form of radiation therapy will depend on the type and size of the cancer tumor. “A high energy linear accelerator usually has two options: X-rays or electrons,” Dr. Lester says. “Electrons are used for superficial tumors like skin cancers or early-stage breast cancer with tumors close to the surface, while X-rays are used for deeper structures.” “Protons are a new form of radiation, and although they are still being studied, they may be beneficial for small brain tumors,” he continues. “The advantage to protons is that you can control the exit dose.” Patients with cancer should consult with a radiation oncologist to determine what procedure is right for them. Dr. Lester stresses that it’s crucial for patients to understand that the volume radiation oncologists treat is based on the cancer. “For example in a prostate (cancer), the rectum bulges up against the prostate and the prostate droops over the rectum,” says Dr. Lester. “Therefore, there is no beam available that won’t treat the front of the rectum at the same time you treat the prostate. When your physician recommends that you need a linear accelerator treatment versus getting referred to an institution that has an active scanning proton beam, the volume has been determined by the tumor, not by the beam.” “At the Central Florida Care Center, we have IMRT and IGRT which is standard throughout the country,” says Dr. Lester. “We can treat 95% of all cancers that are referred to us, and 5% we refer out.” What to Expect from Radiation Oncology When patients and their doctors decide to pursue radiation therapy for cancer treatment, they will likely undergo one of the following two types of radiation oncology treatment types: External Beam Radiation Therapy. External beam radiation therapy can be used to treat many types of cancer. A linear accelerator administers direct radiation to the affected area. Each session lasts about 15 minutes and is generally painless. Patients typically have five treatment sessions each week with a consecutive two-day break to allow healthy tissue that may have been damaged to heal. This continues for about six weeks. Internal Radiation Therapy. This treatment, also known as brachytherapy or seed treatment, involves temporary or permanent placement of radioactive sources in the tumor site. Internal radiation therapy is commonly employed to treat head and neck, breast, cervix, prostate and eye cancer. The procedure allows the doctor to administer a higher total dose of radiation to a smaller area in a single procedure. This treatment can be used alone or combined with external beam radiation. In some cases, radiation therapy can be used in conjunction with surgery, chemotherapy or both. The optimal treatment plan will depend on the type of cancer and how advanced it is. “We’ll be happy to talk to you about your treatment plan and what would be best for you,” says Dr. Lester. For more visit http://cancercarecenter.md/ To learn more about Dr. Lester visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/steven-lester/ To learn more about external beam radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/external-beam-radiation-therapy/ To learn more about internal beam radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/internal-radiation-therapy/ To learn more about image guided radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/imrt-igrt/
Dr. Padmaja Sai & Patient Susie Hellman - Florida Cancer Specialists
 
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Dr. Padmaja Sai discusses the importance of building patient relationships and the advantages of being part of a large, research-focused organization in the ever-evolving landscape of oncology.
FL Hospital End-of-Chemo. Party
 
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B.A.S.E. Camp Children's Cancer Foundation's "End of Chemo" party at Florida Hospital in Orlando on 2007-03-16. B.A.S.E. Camp provides a year-round base of support for children and families in Central Florida who are facing the challenge of living with cancer and other life-threatening hematological illnesses. We serve not only the children who are patients, but their brothers and sisters too. Reproduced with permission from Central FL News 13 (http://www.cfnews13.com).
Views: 1194 basecampccf
What Are Common Questions Patients Ask?
 
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What are common questions patients ask? In this short video, Steven G. Lester, M.D., F.A.C.R.O., a board-certified radiation oncologist, at Central Florida Cancer Care Center shares some common concerns and misconceptions that patients have. “What do patients usually ask at first?” says Dr. Lester. “A lot of the questions we first hear are anxiety-driven. The first thing patients need to know that whatever they’ve heard or read about is probably not true because you always hear the worst. Most of our patients do very well; they don’t have a lot of side-effects, many of them keep working full-time, and most of them after the first couple of days realize that the level of anxiety they had was because they had a misconception about radiation.” “Radiation therapy causes no pain,” Dr. Lester continues. “It only takes about five to ten minutes a day, and any side-effects are cumulative. It’s rare we cause nausea unless we’re treating the upper abdominal area. Most of what we see is a little fatigue and fitting us into your busy schedule.” “Once patients get through the initial planning, and the first couple of days of treatment, they realize this is as we’ve told them, we haven’t tried to sugarcoat it. We’re always realistic, and we will tell you if we’re going to cause significant side-effects.” For more visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/ To learn more about Dr. Lester visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/steven-lester/ To learn about the different types of radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/what-are-the-different-types-of-radiation-therapy/ For commonly asked questions visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/faq/ For more cancer information resources visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/cancer-information/
FHMMC opens Cancer Institute
 
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Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center opened its new state-of-the-art comprehensive Cancer Institute to patients on Thursday, Oct. 7, eliminating the need for cancer patients having to travel out of the area to receive different aspects of their treatment. The new 1-story, 30,000-square-foot facility cost approximately $15 million for the first phase, with shell space to accommodate additional capacity as the need for comprehensive cancer services grows in the community. Inside, there are 14 exam rooms and a 30-person staff, including newly created positions of breast care and lung care navigators. These staff members will walk patients through every aspect of their cancer journey, from diagnosis up until five years after they are discharged. The center has a capacity to treat up to 80 patients a day using two radiation oncology vaults and will treat up to 18 chemotherapy patients each day.
Views: 108 FHMMC
What to Expect During Your First Appointment
 
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What to expect during your first appointment. In this short video, Steven G. Lester, M.D., F.A.C.R.O., a board-certified radiation oncologist, explains what patients can expect during their first appointment at Central Florida Cancer Care Center. “We’re often asked what’s going to happen during your first appointment,” says Dr. Lester. “We try to book an hour to an hour and a half for each new patient because they usually come with a great deal of data as well as with a fair amount of anxiety. We want the patient to understand what is happening and what the recommendations are.” “At your first appointment, long before you see the physician, the staff has accumulated your records, the doctor has reviewed them and asked if more records need to be brought in. We’ve also started working with your referring doctors making sure we’re coordinating your care. Once you’re here, you’ll be seen in an exam room; your records are reviewed, a physical exam may be appropriate and may be performed. And then a lengthy discussion will entail what your treatment options are or what your recommendations are.” Putting first-time patients at ease is important to Dr. Lester. He understands the worry and stress that can come along with a cancer diagnosis. “I’ll try to have the patients get a full tour of the department just to help with their anxiety as they often have a misconception of what radiation treatments are like,” he says. The clinic’s work continues well after patients return home. “After you’re gone, more work goes on behind the scenes regarding completing your medical records, arranging future appointments, and preparing for your treatment if treatment is recommended,” says Dr. Lester. “While you may only be in the exam room for thirty to forty-five minutes, we probably spend two to five hours with each patient’s records and dealing with their initial consultation.” For more visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/ To learn more about Dr. Lester visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/steven-lester/ To learn about the different types of radiation therapy visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/what-are-the-different-types-of-radiation-therapy/ For commonly asked questions visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/faq/ For more cancer information resources visit https://www.cancercarecenter.md/cancer-information/
17132_321_WHHospital_Cassidy
 
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Winter Haven Hospital, in affiliation with the University of Florida College of Medicine, Division of Hematoloy/Oncology, has established the Cassidy Cancer Center, bringing comprehensive high quality cancer care to central Florida.
Views: 4 mixpotube1