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Do not treat Ductal Carcinoma in Situ
 
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Do not treat Ductal Carcinoma in Situ A recent Swedish study recommends radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), It is based on flawed statistics which I explain. When I spot a publication that writes:”studies show that adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) lowers the risk of . . .” I become suspicious since RT is one of the most dangerous treatments in medicine. It is clear to me that the risk of radiotherapy is much greater than the risk of DCIS. So what is the real message of this statistic? Follow me to find the flaw. Their statistic shows that that in 30% of women BCS did neither cure, nor prevent new DCIS. They received a needless treatment! Radiotherapy lowered the overall DCIS incidence but did not affect its yearly rate. RT reduced DCIS manifestation, but did not interfere with cancer progression. Both breasts constitute one evolving cancer field. DCIS is a biomarker of this field. Since its yearly incidence rises by 0.01% this is also the incidence rate of the breast cancer field. Radiotherapy did not reduce progression of the field. Treatment of DCIS did not stop. cancer progression. In both arms DCIS continued popping up at the same rate. You may regard RT as a cosmetic (symptomatic) treatment. This DCIS story reveals the poor state of the theory of medicine. It is guided by floppy statistics , and spreads a fatalistic message: No matter what you do it’s all in your genes. DCIS treatment does not cure, nor does it stop cancer progression. Therefore do not treat DCIS! Do you still remember this? “Above all do not harm!”
Views: 10724 Gershom Zajicek M.D,
Histopathology Breast--Ductal carcinoma in situ
 
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Histopathology Breast--Ductal carcinoma in situ
Views: 50342 WashingtonDeceit
DCIS Breast Cancer: Learn What You Need To Know
 
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We teach you about DCIS and how it is treated. This pre-cancerous problem is also a risk factor for developing invasive cancer and is linked to the BRCA genetic mutation. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ __________________________________ Questions for your Breast Surgeon and Medical Oncologist: 1. Is DCIS a cancer or a pre-cancerous growth? 2. What exactly is the threat to my health from DCIS? 3. Are both surgery and radiation always needed for DCIS? 4. May I have a copy of my pathology reports? 5. Do I qualify for genetic testing if I have DCIS? 6. Will DCIS turn into an invasive cancer if not treated? Ductal Carcinoma In-Situ (DCIS) refers to breast cells that are growing abnormally in an area of the breast, but have not yet evolved to the point where they are considered “invasive breast cancer” and can spread beyond the breast to other parts of the body. Even the medical field is unsure whether to call it “non-invasive” breast cancer or a “pre-cancerous” problem. By definition, DCIS is considered a Stage O breast cancer. Important facts if you have DCIS: *If left untreated, it can evolve into an invasive breast cancer *You have a slightly higher lifetime risk of forming a new cancer in either breast in the future *You may now qualify for BRCA genetic testing. How is DCIS different from invasive cancer? Invasive Breast Cancer can threaten your life because it mau have the capacity to spread (metastasize) to other organs of the body. DCIS does not yet have this ability to spread, but it might if it evolves into an invasive breast cancer in the future. So we treat DCIS very seriously in order to lessen the risk of it developing into an invasive, life-threatening problem. Learn more about “Invasive Breast Cancer“ with our video lesson (here). What is the chance I will die of my DCIS? The risk is very low. The most comprehensive study (here) on the subject in 2015 showed that the risk of dying from any type of breast cancer 20 years after having your DCIS treated with a lumpectomy and radiation is about 1%. One take home message from this study is that you have plenty of time to make decisions with your breast specialists about how to best treat your DCIS. Lumpectomy or Mastectomy for DCIS? Removal of the area of DCIS with surgery is usually the first treatment. A lumpectomy removes the area with a surrounding margin of normal tissue. It is a great surgery if the area of DCIS is small. Radiation is generally recommended after surgery to further lessen the risk of the DCIS or an invasive cancer growing back in that area of the lumpectomy. Some women who are older or have a lower-risk type of DCIS sometimes can avoid radiation after a lumpectomy. A mastectomy is generally recommended only if DCIS involves a large area of the breast and thus would not be a good candidate for a lumpectomy and radiation. A mastectomy for DCIS does not make you live longer, but it does reduce the chance of cancer growing back in that breast. Radiation is generally not needed after a mastectomy for DCIS. Take our video lesson on “Lumpectomy or Mastectomy“ (here) to learn more. You and your breast surgeon must work closely together to decide what surgery is best for your unique cancer situation. Should I take “anti-estrogen” medicines for DCIS? When someone is diagnosed with DCIS, the pathologists will run special studies on the tumor cells to determine if Estrogen receptors and Progesterone receptors are present. If your DCIS is “Estrogen receptor positive,” taking anti-estrogen medications for 5 years can lessen the chance of developing a new breast cancer (either DCIS or invasive cancer) over the next 5 to 10 years if you had a lumpectomy. Taking “tamoxifen” or an “aromatase inhibitor” medication for this purpose is called “chemoprevention.” If a woman has bilateral mastectomies there is no need for chemoprevention because the breast tissue has been removed. Women with DCIS are felt to have an increased risk for developing new cancers in both breasts in the future. Taking these medications can reduce the risk of new breast cancers in these higher risk women, but these drugs are not without potential side effects and risks. That is why a “risk vs benefit” discussion with a medical oncologist is important. You may qualify for genetic testing if you have DCIS. DCIS is now known to be associated with the BRCA gene mutation in as similar way as women with invasive breast cancer. The BRCA (Breast Cancer) gene is commonly referred to as “The Breast Cancer Gene.” If someone inherits a broken version (mutation) of this gene at conception, they carry a very high lifetime risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer.
Carcinoma in situ
 
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Carcinoma in situ (CIS), also known as in situ neoplasm, is a group of abnormal cells. While they are a form of neoplasm there is disagreement over whether CIS should be classified as cancer. This controversy also depends on the exact CIS in question (i.e. cervical, skin, breast). Some authors do not classify them as cancer recognizing that they can potentially become cancer. Others classify certain types as a non-invasive form of cancer. The term "pre-cancer" may also be used. These abnormal cell grow in their normal place thus "in situ" (from Latin for "in its place"). For example, carcinoma in situ of the skin, also called Bowen's disease, is the accumulation of dysplastic epidermal cells within the epidermis only, that has failed to penetrate into the deeper dermis. For this reason, CIS will usually not form a tumor. Rather, the lesion is flat (in the skin, cervix, etc.) or follows the existing architecture of the organ (in the breast, lung, etc.). Exceptions include CIS of the colon (polyps), the bladder (pre-invasive papillary cancer), or the breast (ductal carcinoma ''in situ'' or lobular carcinoma in situ). This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 11165 Audiopedia
How Serious is DCIS Breast Cancer?
 
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In this video, Dr. Jay K. Harness talks about the seriousness of DCIS breast cancer. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk.  If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Breast Cancer Review Series: DCIS and IDC
 
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Breast Cancer Review Part 4
Views: 4418 Leo Valentin MD
What is Carcinoma in situ? - Pathology mini tutorial
 
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A short explanation of the definition of carcinoma in situ illustrated with histological images of examples of carcinoma in situ. Definition of carcinoma in situ 0:20 Behaviour of carcinoma in situ 0:50 carcinoma in situ examples 1:00 DCIS image 1:20 Bladder flat carcinoma in situ 1:43
Cáncer in situ de mama
 
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Dr José Luis Ramírez L
Breast Carcinoma: Invasive - Pathology mini tutorial
 
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The types of breast carcinoma, morphology and prognostic factors Types of breast carcinoma 0:15 Symptoms of invasive breast carcinomas 0:37 Dimpling of skin from breast carcinoma gross image 1:09 Grading breast carcinomas 1:30 Grade 1 carcinoma histology 2:06 Grade 3 carcinoma histology 2:22 Infiltrating lobular carcinoma 2:52 Histology of infiltrating lobular carcinoma 3:30 Poor prognosis breast cancer 4:05 Good prognosis breast cancer 4:57 Tubular carcinoma images 5:18 Mucinous carcinoma image 5:$2
I have Cancer - Diagnosis of Stage 1 Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer
 
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On January 12, 2016 I was diagnosed with Stage 1 Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer. I have since undergone 2 surgeries ... a lumpectomy to remove the tumor and surrounding tissue and another surgery to remove 10 lymph nodes from the armpit area. Next, I will undergo chemotherapy and radiation therapy and my hope is to vlog this process.
Views: 13135 WickedScentuals
ductal carcinoma in situ
 
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Ductal Carcinoma In Situ breast cancer Please SUBSCRIBE Disease Tube Thanks for watching Other videos breast cancer types https://youtu.be/LOjzY_JsxLo breast engorgement Treatment https://youtu.be/7p3vKZnsgVw sign and synptoms of flu https://youtu.be/wQ-L5OsOijU RELATEDD TOPICS ductal carcinoma in situ treatment ductal carcinoma in situ symptoms invasive ductal carcinoma in situ ductal carcinoma in situ survival rate ductal carcinoma in situ pictures ductal carcinoma in situ grade 2 ductal carcinoma in situ histology ductal carcinoma in situ pathology outlines Follow us on GOOGLE+https://plus.google.com/u/0/116754880... FACEBOOK https://web.facebook.com/diseasetube/.
Views: 19 Disease Tube
Invasive Breast Cancer Explained By Dr. Harness
 
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Invasive breast cancer is cancer that has moved outside of the ductal system, Dr. Harness explains. Learn more about invasive breast cancer and its treatments. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers suggest questions and topics and get answers from breast cancer experts. Suggest a topic now at http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk. If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Controvérsias sobre carcinoma ductal in situ de mama
 
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O Dr. Guilherme Novita, médico mastologista do Americas Centro de Oncologia Integrado, fala sobre controvérsias no manejo de pacientes com carcinoma ductal in situ de mama. #OncologiaBrasil #oncologia #oncology #saúde #cancer #cancerdemama #cancerdemamagramado @GuilhermeNovita
Views: 431 Oncologia Brasil
Overtreatment of Stage 0 Breast Cancer DCIS
 
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9 out of 10 women don’t realize that some breast cancers would never have caused any problems (or even become known in one’s lifetime). This is an issue ductal carcinoma in situ has brought to the fore. Subscribe to Dr. Greger’s free nutrition newsletter at https://www.nutritionfacts.org/subscribe and get a free recipe from his new HOW NOT TO DIE COOKBOOK. (All proceeds Dr. Greger receives from his books, DVDs, and speaking directly support NutritionFacts.org). How might one improve their diet and lifestyle to lower breast cancer risk? See, for example: • Breast Cancer and Constipation (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/breast-cancer-and-constipation) • Cholesterol Feeds Breast Cancer Cells (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/cholesterol-feeds-breast-cancer-cells/) • Breast Cancer Survival Vegetable (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/breast-cancer-survival-vegetable/) • Breast Cancer and Alcohol: How Much is Safe? (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/breast-cancer-and-alcohol-what-much-is-safe/) • Which Dietary Factors Affect Breast Cancer Most? (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/which-dietary-factors-affect-breast-cancer-most/) • Is Soy Healthy for Breast Cancer Survivors? (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/Is-Soy-Healthy-for-Breast-Cancer-Survivors) • How to Treat Endometriosis with Seaweed (https://nutritionfacts.org/video/How-to-Treat-Endometriosis-with-Seaweed) This is 9th in a 14-video series on mammograms. In case you missed the first eight, check them out here: • 9 out of 10 Women Misinformed about Mammograms ((http://nutritionfacts.org/video/9-out-of-10-Women-misinformed-about-Mammograms) • Mammogram Recommendations - Why the Conflicting Guidelines (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Mammogram-Recommendations-Why-the-Conflicting-Guidelines) • Should Women Get Mammograms Starting at Age 40? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Should-Women-Get-Mammograms-Starting-at-Age-40) • Do Mammograms Save Lives? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Do-Mammograms-Save-Lives) • Consequences of False-Positive Mammogram Results (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Consequences-of-False-Positive-Mammogram-Results) • Do Mammograms Hurt? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/do-mammograms-hurt) • Can Mammogram Radiation Cause Breast Cancer? (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Can-Mammogram-radiation-Cause-Breast-Cancer) • Understanding the Mammogram Paradox (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Understanding-the-Mammogram-Paradox) Stay tuned for: • Women Deserve to Know the Truth About Mammograms (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Women-Deserve-to-Know-the-Truth-About-Mammograms) • Breast Cancer and the 5-Year Survival Rate Myth (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/breast-Cancer-and-the-5-Year-Survival-Rate-Myth) • Why Mammograms Don’t Appear to Save Lives (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Why-Mammograms-Don) • Why Patients Aren’t Informed About Mammograms (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Why-Patients-Arent-Informed-About-Mammograms) • The Pros and Cons of Mammograms (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/The-Pros-and-Cons-of-Mammograms) Have a question about this video? Leave it in the comment section at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/overtreatment-of-stage-0-breast-cancer-dcis and someone on the NutritionFacts.org team will try to answer it. Want to get a list of links to all the scientific sources used in this video? Click on Sources Cited at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/overtreatment-of-stage-0-breast-cancer-dcis. You’ll also find a transcript and acknowledgments for the video, my blog and speaking tour schedule, and an easy way to search (by translated language even) through our videos spanning more than 2,000 health topics. If you’d rather watch these videos on YouTube, subscribe to my YouTube Channel here: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=nutritionfactsorg Thanks for watching. I hope you’ll join in the evidence-based nutrition revolution! -Michael Greger, MD FACLM Captions for this video are available in several languages. To find yours, click on the settings wheel on the lower-right of the video and then "Subtitles/CC." http://www.NutritionFacts.org • Subscribe: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/subscribe • Donate: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/donate • HOW NOT TO DIE: http://nutritionfacts.org/book • Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NutritionFacts.org • Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nutrition_facts • Instagram: http://instagram.com/nutrition_facts_org/ • Google+: https://plus.google.com/+NutritionfactsOrgMD • Podcast : http://nutritionfacts.org/audio/
Views: 21551 NutritionFacts.org
Breast Carcinoma: in situ - Pathology mini tutorial
 
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The pathology of breast cancer before it becomes invasive (in situ). Age and presentation of DCIS 0:33 DCIS histology 1:11 Paget's disease of the nipple photograph 2:02 Paget's disease of the nipple histology 2:09 LCIS 2:34 LCIS histology 2:59
DCIS Breast Cancer
 
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DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ) Breast Cancer, understanding and treatment
Views: 16151 Robert Miller
Ductal Carcinoma In Situ Defined
 
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Dr. Jay Harness defines ductal carcinoma in situ, or DCIS, for newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. Learn what DCIS means and how it is typically treated. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers suggest questions and topics and get answers from breast cancer experts. Suggest a topic now at http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk.  If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Ductal Carcinoma In Situ-Is Treatment Necessary?
 
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http://www.oginski-law.com Ductal carcinoma in situ is considered to be Stage 0 breast cancer. It's also known as DCIS. What is that? It's a localized breast cancer that has not yet invaded the tissues surrounding the localized lesion. Some medical experts believe this cancer does not need treatment. Others disagree. You might ask yourself, "How can anyone suggest I not get treatment for a confirmed diagnosis of breast cancer?" Watch the video to learn more. To learn more about how medical malpractice cases work in New York, I encourage you to explore my educational website, http://www.oginski-law.com. If you have legal questions, I urge you to pick up the phone and call me since I can answer your legal questions at 516-487-8207 or by e-mail at lawmed10@yahoo.com. I welcome your call. The Law Office of Gerald Oginski, LLC 25 Great Neck Rd., Suite 4 Great Neck, NY 1021 516-487-8207 lawmed10@yahoo.com.
Views: 22930 Gerry Oginski
240 Breast disorders, fibrocystic disease, mammary duct ectasia, USMLE Step 1, USMLE ACE
 
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Presented by USMLE Ace, Inc. For full video please visit www.usmleace.com Ace offers over 1800 questions, 35+ hours educational videos, and more. Full Description Breast disorders, fibrocystic disease, acute mastitis, mammary duct ectasia, fat necrosis, fibroadenoma, intraductal papilloma, Phyllodes tumor, malignant breast tumors, BRCA1 and BRCA2, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), invasive ductal carcinoma, lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), medullary carcinoma, Paget's disease of the breast
Views: 28303 USMLE ACE INC
Understanding DCIS: Types And Treatment Options
 
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Ductal carcinoma in situ, or DCIS, is an early stage of breast cancer where the cancer is confined in the ducts, explains Dr. Harness. In this video Dr. Harness explains the different types of DCIS and the treatment options available. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk. If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
What is DCIS Breast Cancer?
 
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DCIS is one of the most popular terms in relation to breast cancer. There are about 40,000 cases per year. Although we use this term on many of our videos, one of the most popular questions asked by our viewers is, “What exactly is DCIS? What does it stand for?” DCIS is an abbreviation that stands for ductal carcinoma in situ. According to Surgical Oncologist Dr. Jennifer Manders, it is a non-invasive breast cancer that can be diagnosed based on a needle biopsy. Even though DCIS is associated with being a stage 0 breast cancer, it doesn’t always stay DCIS. It can progress. It has the ability to become invasive cancer, although this isn’t true for every DCIS case. Watch the video to hear Dr. Manders talk about the importance of understanding ductal carcinoma in situ. SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE EXPERT INFORMATION AND BREAKING BREAST CANCER NEWS http://www.youtube.com/user/drjayharness VISIT BREASTCANCERANSWERS.com FOR THE LATEST IN BREAKING BREAST CANCER NEWS http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/news SUBMIT A QUESTION http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ DOWNLOAD DR. HARNESS' 15 QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR DOCTOR http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ CONNECT WITH US! Google+: http://bit.ly/16nhEnr Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BreastCancerAnswers Twitter: https://twitter.com/BreastCancerDr
Female breast pathology
 
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This is a brief video on neoplastic and nonneoplastic diseases of the breast in females (excluding gynecomastia) I created this presentation with Google Slides. Image were created or taken from Wikimedia Commons I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor. ADDITIONAL TAGS: Breast pathology Neoplastic and nonneoplastic diseases of the breast in females Fibroadenoma Phyllodes tumor Fat necrosis Acute mastitis Periductal mastitis Mammary duct ectasia Fibrocystic changes Intraductal papilloma Ductal carcinoma in situ Paget disease Invasive ductal carcinoma Lobular neoplasia Invasive lobular carcinoma Benign conditions Malignant conditions Def: Noncancerous breast tumor consisting of stromal and epithelial tissues Epi: women in 20s to 30s, most common benign neoplasm Clinical: painless, firm, rubbery, mobile lump might enlarge based on menstrual cycle (estrogen-sensitive) Gross: solid, lobulated, tan/pink, firm, no necrosis, no hemorrhage; well-circumscribed US: solid, round, homogenous mass; well-circumscribed Histo: gland structures with stromal and ductal proliferation, no cytologic atypia Phyllodes tumor AKA cystosarcoma phyllodes, cystosarcoma phylloides and phylloides tumor Def: Masses arising from stromal cells surrounding ducts of the breast Fibrous neoplasia pushes out tissue→ gross and histologic changes Epi: older (40+ and postmenopausal), African American, rare tumor Clinical: large mass, bulky, mobile, firm as a “wooden log” -- twice as large as the other breast Gross: blue veins on skin surrounding tumor, well-circumscribed Histo: fibrous gland and tissues with intermittent cystic spaces, epithelial leaf-lined structure; cytologic atypia and mitotic figures are rare Spread: might recurs after excision, 5-10 percent undergo malignant transformation Treatment: excise surgically (wide local excision or mastectomy) Fat necrosis AKA fatty lumps Def: normal fat cells of the breast become round lumps through necrosis Caused by trauma, radiation, or surgery involving breast Epi: women post trauma, radiation, or surgery Clinical: painful, induration with irregular contours, retraction of skin Mammogram: eggshell calcification (results from saponification) Gross: necrotic fat tissue → must biopsy to rule out cancer; induration Histo: necrotic fat with calcifications, giant cells, granulation tissue, lipid-laden macrophages Spread: no malignant potential Although confused with cancer bc of calcification, induration, skin retraction, irregular contours Treatment: not necessary Fibroadenoma Phyllodes tumor Fat necrosis Acute mastitis Periductal mastitis Mammary duct ectasia Fibrocystic changes Intraductal papilloma Ductal carcinoma in situ Paget disease Invasive ductal carcinoma Lobular neoplasia Invasive lobular carcinoma Fibroadenoma Phyllodes tumor Fat necrosis Acute mastitis Periductal mastitis Mammary duct ectasia Fibrocystic changes Intraductal papilloma Ductal carcinoma in situ Paget disease Invasive ductal carcinoma Lobular neoplasia Invasive lobular carcinoma Histo: necrotic fat with calcifications, giant cells, granulation tissue, lipid-laden macrophages Acute mastitis Def: bacterial infection of the breast Typically caused by skin organisms Staph aureus (or Strep), when breastfeeding → stress on skin allows bacteria to enter breast Epi: breastfeeding women Clinical: purulent discharge from breast; warm, erythematous breast; engorgement; loss of nipple integrity Spread: no malignant potential dicloxacillin for beta-lactamase-producing organisms such as S aureus) and drainage Periductal mastitis Def: inflammation of breast tissue beneath the nipple Epi: smokers AKA duct ectasia of breast or plasma cell mastitis Def: lactiferous duct becomes blocked or clogged Inflammation of the duct leads to duct dilation → debris piles up and goes into nipple → discharge Epi: postmenopausal, multiparous women; rare Clinical: green/brown nipple discharge Mammogram: typical rod-like calcifications Histo: chronic inflammation, plasma cells Fibrocystic changes AKA fibrocystic breasts or fibrocystic breast disease or fibrocystic breast condition (FBC)
Views: 31269 MedLecturesMadeEasy
Donna's Journey: DCIS -- "Stage Zero" Breast Cancer -- Overdiagnosis & Overtreatment
 
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Donna Pinto shares her personal dilemmas, insights and discoveries following a diagnosis of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) in 2010. See more of her story at www.dcis411.com
Views: 1681 Donna Pinto
DCIS
 
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DCIS is an acronym for ductal carcinoma in situ. DCIS is a precancer that is usually found on a mammogram. In this video, you will learn how DCIS is diagnosed and treated.
De no tratarse a tiempo el carcinoma ductal,  ¿cuáles serían sus complicaciones?
 
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Consulte a su Médico. De la mano de un médico, te daremos a conocer información muy interesante. De las dudas que normalmente tenemos, te daremos a conocer respuestas directamente de expertos en el tema.
Views: 23926 Medicable
Invasive Breast Cancer: We Teach You The Essentials
 
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We teach you how invasive breast cancer can threaten your life and guide you to the key information you need to know to get the best possible treatment. VISIT THE BREAST CANCER SCHOOL FOR PATIENTS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org LIST OF QUESTIONS FOR YOUR DOCTORS: http://www.breastcancercourse.org/breast-health-updates-latest-videos/ FOLLOW US: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Breast-Cancer-School-for-Patients-958519147618444/ ________________________________ Questions for your Breast Cancer Specialists: 1. What is invasive breast cancer? 2. What type of breast cancer do I have? 3. What is the chance I will die of my breast cancer? 4. What are my receptor results? 5. May I have a copy of my pathology report? 6. Do I qualify for genetic testing? 7. What is invasive breast cancer? Invasive breast cancer is defined by breast cells that grow abnormally fast and have developed the ability to spread beyond the breast to other parts of the body. It can take years for breast cells to slowly develop the genetic changes (mutations) to change from a normal cell to an invasive cancer cell. But once they do, some spread more rapidly and others grow very slowly and may not spread at all beyond the breast. Invasive breast cancer can threaten your life. “Non-invasive” breast cancer are cells that also grow abnormally fast, but cannot yet spread beyond the breast to threaten someone’s life. Ductal Carcinoma In-Situ (DCIS) is an example of non-invasive breast cancer and is generally categorized under “breast cancer” by most organizations. It is covered in our “Non-invasive DCIS” lesson and is more of a “pre-cancerous” condition. Important facts if you have an Invasive Breast Cancer: Treatments can cure 90% of all women with breast cancer The majority of all patients are diagnosed at an early stage Surgery, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy, and radiation are treatment options You have time before choosing a treatment pathway You may qualify for genetic testing Types of invasive breast cancer: Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma is the most common (70%) type of invasive breast cancer. It is called “ductal” because the cancer cells originate from the cells lining the milk ducts. There are many other factors beyond “type” of cancer that are important. Infiltrating Lobular Carcinoma occurs in less than 20% of patients. It is called “lobular” because the cells originate from the “lobules” of the milk ducts. Lobular cancers are no worse or better than invasive ductal cancers from a survival perspective. There are some unique features of lobular cancers that can affect diagnosis and treatment. Ask you physician how an invasive lobular carcinoma is different from an invasive ductal carcinoma. Other types: Inflammatory Breast Cancer (5%) is a very aggressive cancer. Colloid and Mucinous (3%) are considered less aggressive breast cancers and carry a lower risk to one’s health. There are other less common types of invasive breast cancer that we have not covered. What is the chance I will die of my cancer? Most women just diagnosed with breast cancer have no idea how much of a risk to their life their unique situation poses. Any invasive breast cancer does impart some level of risk to your life. However, this risk is usually less than you would assume. Why are “receptors” important? Receptors are tiny proteins on the surface of the cells that act like “light switches” that can turn on and off cancer cell growth. The Estrogen receptor (ER), Progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2 receptor results are incredibly important for you to know and understand. Take our lesson on “My Tumor Receptors” to learn the essentials. How do you treat invasive breast cancer? The most common first treatment for early stage invasive breast cancer is surgery, possibly followed by chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and then hormonal therapy. Breast cancer treatment is incredibly complex and there can be many different approaches to the same type of breast cancer. There are some situations that are better treated by “neoadjuvant chemotherapy” as a first treatment rather than surgery. The Breast Cancer School for Patients was created to help you to make the best treatment decisions with your breast specialists in your community. You may qualify for genetic testing Invasive breast cancer is known to be associated with the BRCA gene mutation. The BRCA (Breast Cancer) gene is commonly referred to as “The Breast Cancer Gene.” If someone inherits a broken version (mutation) of this gene at conception, they carry a very high lifetime risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer. Most breast cancers are not the result of the BRCA mutation. In fact, it is estimated that the BRCA and similar genetic mutations cause only 10 to 15% of all breast cancers. It is important to ask your physicians if you meet the guidelines for genetic counseling and testing. Take our “BRCA Genetic Testing” lesson to learn more.
Caso clínico: Carcinoma ductal invasivo
 
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Alexia Urbán Solano Grupo 4CM13
Views: 9374 Alexia US
What is the best treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ
 
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What is the best treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ - Find out more explanation for : 'What is the best treatment for ductal carcinoma in situ' only from this channel. Information Source: google
Views: 10 atunakai9c
Histopathology Breast --Ductal carcinoma
 
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Histopathology Breast --Ductal carcinoma
Views: 45533 WashingtonDeceit
Understanding Breast Cancer Subtypes: Ductal Carcinoma In Situ
 
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Although breast cancer has been a human disease for thousands of years, ductal carcinoma in situ or DCIS is a relatively new diagnosis. Researchers are continuing to find new information about this breast cancer subtype. Before mammography was a routine part of medical care, DCIS was not found often. Now, approximately 24% of all new cases of breast cancer diagnosed in the United States are classified as DCIS, with one case of DCIS detected per 1300 screening mammograms in North America.
Views: 321 EmpoweredDoctor
DCIS - Ductal carcinoma in situ San Diego
 
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https://lajollasurgical.com/ DCIS stands for ductal carcinoma in situ. This means the cancer cells are inside the milk ducts or 'in situ' (in place) and have not developed the ability to spread either within or outside the breast. DCIS is an early form of breast cancer and may be described as a pre-invasive, non-invasive or intraductal cancer. General surgeon, Cheryl Olson, MD, joined Surgical Associates of La Jolla in 1998. While on staff at Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla, Dr. Olson has been a leader in the community serving as section chief in general surgery, on the Ximed board of directors, as well as president of both the San Diego Society of General Surgeons and the San Diego Chapter of the American College of Surgeons. Exemplifying the quality of her care and the utmost respect of her peers, she has been selected as one of "San Diego’s Top doctors” five times in the last 8 years. Dr. Olson’s expertise and care of cancer patients includes state-of-the-art procedures for treating breast cancer including ultrasound guided biopsy, breast conservation and the use of accelerated partial breast radiation catheters. All care she provides is highly specialized and tailored to the unique needs of the patient, which may include nipple and areolar sparing mastectomy followed by immediate reconstruction which are coordinated with an experienced plastic surgeon.
Cancer Survivor Story - Pamela Carrillo - Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) Breast Cancer
 
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Watch this video now to hear this inspiring breast cancer survivor story. For more incredible and brave survivor stories, follow this link: http://bit.ly/cancer-survivor-story-yt. Pamela was diagnosed in April 2015 with invasive ductal carcinoma. The news was difficult to hear and she had trouble eating and sleeping for a few weeks. Watch this cancer survivor story to learn what she realized next and how she began to research alternatives through websites such as Cancer Tutor. Although she found the research helpful, she had trouble finding a clinic. After receiving The Truth About Cancer videos from a friend, the first video she heard was Dr. Ben Johnson discussing mammograms, which really hit home for her. At that time, Pamela’s tumor had grown from 5 to 8 centimeters. Watch this video to learn what treatment she chose and how the size of her tumor was reduced by nearly 75%! When her doctor recommended low-dose chemo again, she decided that she would pursue non-toxic treatment and visit Hope4Cancer in Tijuana. Watch this video to learn the amazing effect that non-toxic treatment had for Pamela after just 3 weeks and where she stands today in her cancer journey. Learn more in this video about the amazing work that Pamela and her husband are now doing with Cancer Tutor to make sure patients have additional cancer resources. If you like this video, please give it a thumbs up and share it with others you love and care about. WATCH MORE INCREDIBLE CANCER SURVIVOR STORIES: http://bit.ly/cancer-survivor-story-yt ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Have you survived a cancer diagnosis and lived to tell about it? We hear so many amazing stories from our readers about how they beat cancer using the very techniques they’ve learned from The Truth About Cancer… and we’d love to hear YOUR story! Sharing these stories brings hope to those who have been diagnosed with or are currently dealing with cancer. So, if you have a personal story to share of your triumph over cancer, please follow this link and tell us all about it: http://bit.ly/your-cancer-survivor-story-yt . Each week we’ll post a new story on our site from the submissions. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Visit our website: http://bit.ly/official-website-ttac-yt Join TTAC's 1 million FB fans: http://bit.ly/TTAC-Facebook-YT Follow us on PINTEREST: http://bit.ly/TTAC-Pinterest-YT Find us on INSTAGRAM: http://bit.ly/TTAC-Instagram-YT Support our mission by commenting and sharing with your friends and family below. -------------------------------------------------- About The Truth About Cancer -------------------------------------------------- The Truth About Cancer’s mission is to inform, educate, and eradicate the pandemic of cancer in our modern world. Every single day, tens of thousands of people just like you are curing cancer (and/or preventing it) from destroying their bodies. It’s time to take matters into your own hands and educate yourself on real cancer prevention and treatments. It could save your life or the life of someone you love. --------------------------------------- About Ty Bollinger --------------------------------------- Ty Bollinger is a devoted husband, father, a best-selling author, and a Christian. He is also a licensed CPA, health freedom advocate, cancer researcher, former competitive bodybuilder, and author of the best-selling book Cancer - Step Outside the Box, which has sold over 100,000 copies worldwide. After losing his mother and father and several family members to cancer, Ty’s heartbreak and grief coupled with his firm belief that chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery were the NOT the most effective treatments available for cancer patients led him on a path of discovery. He began a quest to learn everything he possibly could about alternative cancer treatments and the medical industry. What he uncovered was shocking. On his journey, he’s interviewed cutting-edge scientists, leading alternative doctors, and groundbreaking researchers to learn about hidden alternative cancer treatments. What he uncovered help to create The Truth About Cancer and its 3 awe-inspiring docu-series: The Quest for The Cures, The Quest For The Cures Continues, and The Truth About Cancer: A Global Quest. Ty has touched the hearts and changed the lives of thousands of people around the world. Ty speaks frequently at conferences, local health group meetings, churches, and guest stars on multiple radio and TV shows and writes for numerous magazines and websites. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Truth About Cancer,truth about cancer,the truth about cancer event,ty bollinger,global quest,a global quest,breast cancer survivor story,cancer survivor stories,how to cure cancer naturally,healing cancer naturally,Alternative cancer treatments,cancer survivor story
Breast cancer video: explaining ductal carcinoma in situ
 
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In this video from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), breast cancer surgeon Stephen Edge, MD, Chair of Breast and Soft Tissue Surgery at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, explains how ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is different from invasive breast cancer and why women with ductal carcinoma in situ usually do not get chemotherapy. The NCCN is a not-for-profit alliance of 21 leading cancer centers—including Roswell Park Cancer Institute—dedicated to improving care for cancer patients. You can find more information on breast cancer in the NCCN Guidelines for Patients with Breast Cancer, available at www.NCCN.com. These guidelines, part of the NCCN Guidelines for Patients series, discuss most types of breast cancer along with treatment options.
DCIS: Non-Invasive Breast Cancer
 
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Touro's Breast Surgical Oncologist, Dr. James Colfry, discusses the diagnosis and treatment options of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS), a non-invasive form of breast cancer.
Views: 794 Touro Infirmary
Q&A with Dr. David Hyams on Ductal Carcinoma in Situ
 
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Web Chat with the Expert series on Advances in Treatment Decision Making for Patients with Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS). Question and Answer session.
Views: 1953 OMNIConnect
Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS) - a preview
 
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See more women sharing their experiences of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS) on healthtalk.org http://healthtalk.org/peoples-experiences/cancer/ductal-carcinoma-situ-dcis/topics
Views: 670 healthtalk.org
Carcinoma breast-classification, Ductal carcinoma in situ and lobular carcinoma in situ
 
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Basic pathology of breast carcinoma for medical and paramedical students.
Views: 206 ashish Chauhan
Is DCIS Cancer or Not?
 
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Women diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) are confused about whether or not DCIS is cancer or not. MDs are no different! About 2% of DCIS cancers are lethal and the other 98% will die with it and not from it. Twenty to twenty five percent of all breast cancers are DCIS. Mainstream treatment for this condition includes surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Women and many MDs are questioning this approach, but it is good news for the pharmaceutical companies, surgeons, radiologists, and oncologists because treating DCIS is an extremely profitable business. The diagnosis is usually made by mammography, and differentiation between those cancers that are potentially lethal and those that are incidental is not possible. It may be possible using breast thermography to get more information about which of these tumors is most likely to be malignant. Take Dr. Saputo's Breast Cancer Health Assessment Once you have breast cancer you need to know the best strategies to slow down or reverse its growth. In Dr. Saputo's Breast Cancer Health Assessment we will ask you about the type of breast cancer you have, what treatment you've considered or completed, whether or not you're interested in CAM approaches to treatment, and important lifestyle factors that could have an impact on how your cancer will affect you. You will immediately be emailed back audios and videos Dr. Saputo believes will guide you to information that can help you manage your cancer and support the body's immune defenses. There is a lot we can do to prevent activating cancer genes and to protect us from developing breast cancer. Most breast cancers are epigenetic, not genetic! http://doctorsaputo.com/a/breast-cancer-health-assessment
Views: 3679 DoctorSaputo
¿Cuáles son los síntomas del carcinoma ductal?
 
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Consulte a su Médico. De la mano de un médico, te daremos a conocer información muy interesante. De las dudas que normalmente tenemos, te daremos a conocer respuestas directamente de expertos en el tema.
Views: 8958 Medicable
Breast Cancer Subtypes: Understanding Invasive Ductal Carcinoma
 
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Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) is a form of breast cancer that originates in the cells lining the ducts of the breast. In this type breast cancer, the cells have begun to spread to surrounding breast tissue, with the capacity to eventually spread to other areas of the body. IDC is the most commonly diagnosed form of breast cancer and accounts for roughly 75% of all cases.
Views: 2572 EmpoweredDoctor
Breast Cancer Awareness - Hindi
 
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Dr Sajjan Rajpurohit, Consultant, - Medical Oncology, Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute & Research Centre, New Delhi talks about the scourge of breast cancer and how the advances in diagnosis and management gives hope to thousands of sufferers and their caregivers. Learn more about cancers at http://www.IndianCancerCare.org
Views: 83920 Indiancancercare1
High-Grade DCIS, What Is It? -Dr. Jay Harness
 
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There is a grading system for in situ of breast cancer and Dr. Harness explains that there are three grades - high grade, intermediate grade, and low grade that are related to the biology of the in situ breast cancer. Click Here & Get The 15 Breast Cancer Questions To Ask Your Doctor http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/what-breast-cancer-questions-to-ask/# Breast Cancer Answers is a social media show where viewers submit a question and get the answer from an expert. Submit your question now at, http://www.breastcanceranswers.com/ask. This information should not be relied upon as a substitute for personal medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use the information provided on this site solely at your own risk.  If you have any concerns about your health, please consult with a physician.
Ductal carcinoma in situ: Anastrozole versus tamoxifen
 
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Dr Mamounas talks to ecancertv at SABCS 2015 about the outcomes of a study comparing the use of adjuvant anastrozole versus tamoxifen in postmenopausal patients with estrogen-receptor (ER) positive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Traditionally women with estrogen-receptor (ER) positive DCIS undergoing lumpectomy have been treated with adjuvant tamoxifen. So the aim here was to see if treatment with anastrozole was as good at preventing local recurrence, Dr Mamounas explains. Postmenopausal women under the age of 60 years particularly seemed to benefit from anastrozole rather than tamoxifen, he observes, but there was no advantage of one treatment over the other in older women. Anastrozole and tamoxifen have different side effect profiles, he notes, which would also influence treatment choice.
Views: 576 ecancer
Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)
 
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Every year thousands of women are diagnosed with an early form of breast cancer called ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) after having a routine mammogram. We interviewed 35 women about their experiences of DCIS found through routine breast screening. This video contains a series of excerpts from those interviews. To see more visit www.healthtalkonline.org
Views: 6712 HTOADMIN
My Breast Cancer Story at age 41
 
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This is my Breast Cancer story. I was diagnosed with DCIS (Ductal Carcinoma in Situ) Stage 2a breast cancer. It was diagnosed as stage 2 due to the size of the tumor which was 2.1mm. *Correction, in the video I said that it was 2 months or so from time of diagnosis to surgery; but it was 1 month.* Disclaimer: This video is about MY story, MY experience and MY opinions only. Please do NOT take this as any kind of medical advice. Thank you. Wig I'm wearing is London Girl by Freetress Equal in color TT27. Follow me: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/makeuphairjunkieover40/ Facebook: Makeuphairjunkieover40