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Immunotherapy cancer treatment: New research shows drugs can reduce tumor size - TomoNews
 
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LONDON — Two immunotherapy drugs when used together can shrink cancerous tumours by up to a third in some patients, a new British trial suggests. Combining two cancer drugs, ipilimumab and nivolumab, shrank cancerous tumors by a third in 58 percent of cases in a 945-patient medical trial published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The immune system has brakes in place to stop it from attacking the body's own tissue. Cancer uses these brakes to evade detection. The drugs used in the trial, ipilimumab and nivolumab, remove these brakes, helping the immune system deal with the cancer, according to the BBC. Response to the combined treatment varied among those patients trialled, with many reacting well, and others not seeing any benefit. Experts warned that combining the two treatments can cause severe side effects such as diarrhea and fatigue, as well as elevated liver enzymes and other symptoms. According to Bloomberg, the combined treatment would have an annual cost of more than $250,000 at current rates. It is hoped that the immunotherapies will lead to more effective cancer treatment in the future. The British-led trial was conducted by researchers from the Royal Marsden Hospital, London, South West Wales Cancer Institute and several other international institutions. The research was funded by Bristol-Myers Squibb, the company that manufactures the drugs being tested. ----------------------------------------­--------------------- Welcome to TomoNews, where we animate the most entertaining news on the internets. Come here for an animated look at viral headlines, US news, celebrity gossip, salacious scandals, dumb criminals and much more! Subscribe now for daily news animations that will knock your socks off. Visit our official website for all the latest, uncensored videos: http://us.tomonews.net Check out our Android app: http://bit.ly/1rddhCj Check out our iOS app: http://bit.ly/1gO3z1f Stay connected with us here: Facebook http://www.facebook.com/TomoNewsUS Twitter @tomonewsus http://www.twitter.com/TomoNewsUS Google+ http://plus.google.com/+TomoNewsUS/ Instagram @tomonewsus http://instagram.com/tomonewsus -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Crying dog breaks the internet’s heart — but this sad dog story has a happy ending" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4prKTN9bYQc -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 12351 TomoNews US
Anti-CLTA-4 Drug (ipilimumab): Targeted T-Cell Antibody for Metastatic Melanoma
 
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There is now a new treatment option for people with metastatic melanoma. A drug called ipilimumab blocks the actoin of the protein molecule that suppresses the immune system from fighting disease. FDA approval is expected by December 2010. Ipilimumab targets the protecin molecule, CTLA-4 ( or cytoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen 4), which is found on white blood cells and suppresses the immune system from fighting disease. When taken, it acts as a T-cell potentiator, however, and blocks the action of the CTLA-4, allowing the patient's immune system to fight the cancer more vigorously. ➨ Visit Cleveland Clinic: http://bit.ly/XlxDfr ➨ Visit Health Hub from Cleveland Clinic: http://bit.ly/VBQ3nW ➨ Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/W0bJ0y ➨ Like Cleveland Clinic on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/WMFkul ➨ Follow Cleveland Clinic on Twitter: http://bit.ly/Uua1Gs ➨ Follow Cleveland Clinic on Google+: http://bit.ly/136vcTe ➨ Follow Cleveland Clinic on Instagram: http://bit.ly/12gMABx ➨ Connect with Cleveland Clinic on LinkedIn: http://linkd.in/120XfNs ➨ Follow Cleveland Clinic on Pinterest: http://bit.ly/11QqS3A
Views: 11744 Cleveland Clinic
Immunotherapy cancer treatment: New research shows drugs can reduce tumor size
 
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Originally published on 02 June, 2015 Sign up for a free trial of News Direct's animated news graphics at http://newsdirect.nma.com.tw/Reuters.aspx ----------------------------------------­----------------------------------------­---------------- Two immunotherapy drugs when used together can shrink cancerous tumours by up to a third in some patients, a new British trial suggests. Combining two cancer drugs, ipilimumab and nivolumab, shrank cancerous tumors by a third in 58 percent of cases in a 945-patient medical trial published in the New England Journal of Medicine. The immune system has brakes in place to stop it from attacking the body’s own tissue. Cancer uses these brakes to evade detection. The drugs used in the trial, ipilimumab and nivolumab, remove these brakes, helping the immune system deal with the cancer, according to the BBC. Response to the combined treatment varied among those patients trialled, with many reacting well, and others not seeing any benefit. Experts warned that combining the two treatments can cause severe side effects such as diarrhea and fatigue, as well as elevated liver enzymes and other symptoms. According to Bloomberg, the combined treatment would have an annual cost of more than $250,000 at current rates. It is hoped that the immunotherapies will lead to more effective cancer treatment in the future. The British-led trial was conducted by researchers from the Royal Marsden Hospital, London, South West Wales Cancer Institute and several other international institutions. The research was funded by Bristol-Myers Squibb, the company that manufactures the drugs being tested. ----------------------------------------­----------------------------------------­---------------- Next Media Animation’s News Direct service provides daily, high-quality, informative 3D animated news graphics that fill in for missing footage and help viewers understand breaking news stories or in-depth features on science, technology, and health. To subscribe to News Direct or for more info, please visit: http://newsdirect.nma.com.tw/Index.aspx
Views: 1061 News Direct
Are TMB and Nivolumab/Ipilimumab Ready for Clinical Use? Insights from CheckMate 227 (BMIC-035)
 
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Dr. Jack West considers whether the results from the CheckMate 227 trial comparing nivolumab/ipilimumab to chemotherapy in patients with advanced NSCLC & high tumor mutation burden should change our management: AreTMB & nivo/ipi ready for prime time? Visit http://BeaconMedIC.com for more media & information.
Views: 391 BeaconMedIC
Opdivo + Yervoy’s FDA Win for Colorectal Cancer – What Pharma Needs to Know
 
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In July 2018, Opdivo + Yervoy received FDA approval for colorectal cancer on the back of a Phase II study. Dr. Andrew Merron, Executive Director, DRG Oncology, discusses: - 2 reasons why this approval is significant - The outlook for other checkpoint inhibitors in the pipeline for colorectal cancer - Key issues pharma needs to consider while pursuing colorectal cancer drug development
CheckMate 214: nivolumab   ipilimumab vs sunitinib for advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma
 
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Dr Escudier presents in a press conference at the ESMO 2017 Congress data from the CheckMate 214 trial looking into the efficacy and safety of nivolumab ipilimumab versus sunitinib for treatment-naïve advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma, including IMDC risk and PD- L1 expression subgroups. More from ESMO 2017 : http://ecancer.org/conference/722-esmo-2017.php Ecancer website: http://ecancer.org/video/index.php Twitter: @ecancer Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ecancer
Views: 350 ecancer
Advanced Melanoma & Immunotherapy: Leta Brown's Story
 
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Leta Brown of Maryland was only 43 when she was diagnosed with advanced metastatic melanoma in 2013. She sought treatment at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital where she enrolled in a clinical trial of two immunotherapy agents, nivolumab (Opdivo) and ipilimumab (Yervoy) through Georgetown University's Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. Within weeks her cancer began to shrink. Today she is cancer free. Leta's treatment regimen for advanced melanoma is now FDA approved. To make an appointment or learn more, call 1-888-666-3432 or visit MedStarGeorgetownCancer.org.
Why Cryoablation works for Cancer
 
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Image guided cryoablation combined with immunotherapy, Yervoy, Opdivo and Keytruda significantly enhances the results of these very exciting new anti-cancer drugs.
Views: 7903 Jason Williams
Patient to Patient: What You Need to Know About Cancer Immunotherapy
 
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How does a cancer diagnosis interrupt your life? Why choose immunotherapy? Two patients offer two very different perspectives on life with cancer, choosing a clinical trial, and figuring out what's next in life. In this webinar designed for patients and caregivers, T.J. Sharpe and Donna Fernandez share their experiences with cancer immunotherapy as well as share advice for patients currently seeking or receiving immunotherapy treatment. T.J. Sharpe, was diagnosed with metastatic melanoma in 2012, just weeks after the birth of his second child. Not satisfied with the standard of care treatments offered to him, he and his family began exploring immunotherapy. Two clinical trials later, he is living a full life, now on maintenance Keytruda, devoting the bulk of his time to his family and to melanoma advocacy. T.J. writes a blog for philly.com called Patient 1. (The name of his blog was inspired by the first clinical trial he enrolled in at Moffit Cancer Center, in which he was the first patient ever to receive Yervoy and TIL (tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, a type of adoptive cell transfer).) Donna Fernandez was first diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer in 2012, when she went to the doctor believing she had a thyroid problem. At the time, Donna was working full time and doing dog agility several nights a week and every weekend. Her tumors did not respond to chemotherapy, and when faced with beginning a second chemotherapy regimen, Donna instead enrolled in an immunotherapy trial of nivolumab (Opdivo). Donna responded immediately. Her scans show that the tumors have remained stable. Donna continues training with her two dogs, Cotton and Barney. She says, “Opdivo has let me live my life exactly how I want to. People talk about a “new normal” after cancer, but I don’t have a new normal. I’m still living my old normal.” The "Cancer Immunotherapy and You" webinar series is produced by the Cancer Research Institute and is made possible with generous support from Bristol-Myers Squibb, with additional support from Regeneron, Sanofi Genzyme, and Adaptimmune. Browse our Cancer Immunotherapy and You Webinar Series playlist on YouTube or visit the Webinars page on our website to see other webinars in this series. http://www.cancerresearch.org/webinars
Success for ipilimumab and nivolumab combo in advanced melanoma
 
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Visit http://www.ecancer.org for more. Prof Sznol talks to ecancertv at ASCO 2014 about the results from an expanded phase I study which show that concurrent treatment with immunotherapy drugs ipilimumab and nivolumab produces an unprecedented median survival of roughly three and a half years (40 months) for patients with advanced melanoma. ecancer's filming at ASCO has been kindly supported by Amgen through the ECMS Foundation. ecancer is editorially independent and there is no influence over content.
Views: 1557 ecancer
Opdivo (nivolumab) the Immunotherapy Cancer Treatment
 
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Opdivo (nivolumab) is an FDA approved immunotherapy cancer drug treatment that is showing great promise for treating various types of cancer, including melanoma, lung cancer, kidney cancer and Hodgkin lymphoma. As a disease, cancer escapes the immune system by producing certain proteins that can hide it. As the cancer can cloak itself, the immune system does not detect it. Opdivo is an antibody that binds to the protein called PD-1 on T cells that live in our immune system. T-cells are like a car ignition that gets the immune system off and running, helping it find and kill cancer cells. In this video, oncologist Dr. Stephen Lemon provides an overview about this cancer treatment. Visit http://www.oacancer.com/opdivo-immunotherapy-cancer-treatment/ to learn more about this promising new immunotherapy treatment. #Opdivo (nivolumab) is developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb. Besides being FDA approved for the treatment of certain cancers like #melanoma and lung cancer, Opdivo is also being studied for the treatment of many other types of cancer. These videos are produced by Dr. Stephen Lemon to help provide useful cancer information to patients and survivors. Dr. Lemon practices with the Overlake Cancer Cetner in the Seattle, WA area. Visit https://www.lightersideofcancer.com/ to learn more about him. Oncology Associates provides a full range of personalized cancer treatment at its two Omaha clinics, as well as at cancer treatment clinics in Blair and Norfolk, Nebraska. To learn more about OA's approach to personalized #cancertreatment, as well as the #oncologists and staff, please visit http://www.oacancer.com #immunotherapy #hodgekinlymphoma #drstephenlemon #stephenlemonmd #lightersideofcancer
Views: 33240 Oncology Associates
Nivolumab and ipilimumab for metastatic kidney cancer
 
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Dr Escudier speaks with ecancer at ESMO 2017 about the results of Checkmate 214, a trial combining PD-1 and CTLA-4 targeted therapies to treat metastatic renal cell carcinoma, compared to current therapy sunitinib. While most patients responded better to the combination of nivolumab and ipilimumab, Dr Escudier notes that a small subset of patients who had good prospects at diagnosis and a low presence of PDL-1 on tumour cells may yet benefit from sunitinib or cabozantinib, which has also proven effective in treating mRCC. ecancer's filming has been kindly supported by Amgen through the ECMS Foundation. ecancer is editorially independent and there is no influence over content. More from ESMO 2017 : http://ecancer.org/conference/722-esmo-2017.php Ecancer website: http://ecancer.org/video/index.php Twitter: @ecancer Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ecancer
Views: 190 ecancer
Checkmate 067 - combined nivolumab and ipilimumab
 
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Dr Topalian speaks with ecancer at AACR 2017 about the combination of ipilimumab and nivolumab for advanced melanoma. The results were presented at the conference by Dr James Larkin, and Dr Topalian comments on the response rates and overall survival in the combination. She considers the prospective value of BRAF and PD-1 biomarkers, and notes a significant increase in trial discontinuation due to adverse events.
Views: 522 ecancer
Benefits and risks of treatment with ipilimumab after complete resection of Stage III melanoma
 
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Dirk Schadendorf, MD, PhD, from the University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany, discusses the risks and benefits of adjuvant ipilimumab treatment after complete resection of Stage III melanoma based on the results of a recent Phase III trial (EORTC 18071, NCT00636168) at the European Cancer Congress of the European Cancer Organisation (ECCO) 2017 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Prof. Schadendorf describes that patients receiving adjuvant ipilimumab treatment following surgical resection of Stage III melanoma, who are at risk of relapse, have an 11% increase in overall survival (OS) after 5 years. However, 50% of Stage III melanoma patients are surviving to 5 years without adjuvant treatment after resection, and maintenance therapy at a dose of 10 mg/kg for up to 3 years, as was used in this trial, is accompanied by high toxicity and high incidence of side effects including severe colitis, and is also associated with high cost, which leads to debate about whether these patients should be exposed to this toxic treatment. Prof. Schadendorf argues that once a 5-year survival is achieved, there is a high chance of long-term survival or cure of melanoma, but points out the advantages of identifying patients who will benefit from adjuvant ipilimumab treatment after Stage III melanoma resection, perhaps through the development of biomarkers.
Views: 195 VJOncology
Darcy Doherty Needs Experimental Cancer Treatment or He Will Die
 
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Credit with sincere thanks to Global Toronto: http://www.globaltoronto.com/cancer-stricken+toronto+dad+fights+for+use+of+experimental+drug/6442651994/story.html Petition: Bristol-Myers Squibb: Help save our dad http://www.change.org/petitions/bristol-myers-squibb-help-save-our-dad Twitter: #helpsavedarcy Facebook: Help Save Darcy https://www.facebook.com/HelpSaveDarcyNow From Facebook: "To help Darcy get access to this new drug, please sign his online petition at www.change.org/HelpSaveDarcy and contact Bristol-Myers Squibb at 800-332-2056. #helpsavedarcy My name is Darcy Doherty. I am a 48 and father of Ganden, Reid and Cian. My family and I am are seeking compassionate access to a new cancer treatment in an attempt to extend my life. The experimental drug, BMS-936558, is in Phase 1 clinical trails at research locations in Canada and the U.S.A. In April, I was excluded from one because of new marginal cancer growth in my brain. "Darcy has led a brave and heroic struggle against this disease for the past five years," explains my wife, Rebecca Cumming. "And now, the kids and I are devastated that a promising drug is out there and proving successful in patients with Darcy's diagnosis, yet we can't get to it." Doherty's oncologist, Dr. David Hogg, Attending Physician at Princess Margaret Hospital and Professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto, believes that his patient can benefit from this new treatment. "Mr. Doherty had a fantastic response to the then-experimental immunotherapy drug, ipilimumab (Yervoy®), in 2007. That drug has given him four years of life, and I believe that he may experience a similar benefit from BMS-936558." The manufacturer of Yervoy, Bristol-Myers Squibb whose Canadian head office is in Montréal, also produces this new drug. The company has repeatedly blocked Cumming's appeals for access over the past weeks explaining that it does not have a compassionate use program. "I respect the company's trial criteria," Cumming states, "but cannot accept that we are not able to get compassionate access to this potentially life-saving drug. We've all come so far and worked too hard to be prevented from this new treatment." Dr. Michael Giordano, Head of Development, Oncology and Immunosciences at Bristol-Myers Squibb explains his company's position. "We strive to develop promising drugs as quickly as feasible while remaining mindful of protecting patient safety. [This drug] currently does not have an established benefit/risk profile, given [its] limited experience in humans. We are not in a position to allow [its] use outside of a highly controlled trial." For a devastated and discouraged Cumming, "it doesn't add up. Darcy has absolutely nothing to lose." Given his previous success with immunotherapy when his brain cancer reduced significantly, "We see no risks at this point; without this drug he will die," she declares."
Views: 1160 Charles Chapman
Adverse effects associated with ipilimumab - Video abstract: 31873
 
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Video abstract of review paper "Characteristics and management of immune-related adverse effects associated with ipilimumab, a new immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma" published in open access journal Cancer Management and Research by Stephanie Andrews and Rita Holden. Abstract: When diagnosed in its early stages, melanoma is highly treatable and associated with good long-term outcomes; however, the prognosis is much poorer for patients diagnosed with advanced or metastatic melanoma. For decades, available treatments were effective in only a few patients and associated with significant safety concerns. Ipilimumab is a novel immunotherapy which has proved to be an exciting breakthrough in the treatment of melanoma. It is the first drug approved for the treatment of melanoma by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) which has shown a survival benefit in a randomized Phase III clinical trial. The objective of this review is to provide information on the administration, treatment responses, and expected outcomes of treatment of metastatic melanoma with the new immunotherapeutic agent, ipilimumab, a drug with a unique mechanism of action that differentiates it from current treatments. Guidelines for the management of immune-related adverse events associated with ipilimumab therapy are also presented. These stress vigilance, prompt intervention, and the use of corticosteroids as appropriate. Various ipilimumab-associated immune-related adverse events, both common (enterocolitis, dermatitis) and less frequent (hepatitis, hypophysitis), are illustrated in case studies. Nurses are uniquely positioned to provide patient and caregiver education on how this new therapy differs from traditional cytotoxic agents, to recognize the signs and symptoms of immune-related adverse events, and to report them immediately, and finally, to be aware of the patterns of response that are commonly observed in patients receiving ipilimumab therapy. Read this review and sign up to receive the Cancer Management and Research journal: http://www.dovepress.com/characteristics-and-management-of-immune-related-adverse-effects-assoc-peer-reviewed-article-CMAR
Views: 1567 Dove Medical Press
She's the Answer to Cancer...and So Are You
 
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At age 22, Sharon Belvin learned that stage IV melanoma was about to cut her life tragically short. Determined to live, she enrolled in a clinical trial of an immunotherapy called Yervoy (ipilimumab). The drug allowed her immune system to attack the cancer, and today, more than ten years later, she has no evidence of disease--she is effectively cured of cancer. Having overcome cancer, Sharon dedicated herself to healthy living including regular exercise and a nutritious diet. In this video, Sharon explains why she is willing to cycle 100+ miles in support of the Cancer Research Institute's Answer To Cancer cycling event. Be inspired to ride with us on June 10, 2017, in New York's beautiful Lower Hudson Valley. Register to ride, volunteer, or donate at www.a2c.org.
Nivolumab and ipilimumab for metastatic sarcoma
 
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Dr D'Angelo speaks with ecancer at ASCO 2017 about results from a phase II multicenter trial of nivolumab with or without ipilimumab for patients with metastatic sarcoma. She notes the success of those responding to treatment, with a manageable toxicity profile, and considers how response rates could be improved considering the frequency of treatment related adverse events.
Views: 62 ecancer
Dr. Wolchok on Weighing Risk and Benefit of Nivolumab/Ipilimumab Combo in Melanoma
 
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Jedd D. Wolchok, MD, PhD, chief, Melanoma and Immunotherapeutics Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, discusses weighing the overall survival (OS) benefit with the increased risk of toxicities seen with the combination of nivolumab (Opdivo) and ipilimumab (Yervoy) in treatment-naïve patients with advanced melanoma. Deciding whether to use this combination requires physicians to have a full discussion of all of the data with their patients, including the OS, response rates, and toxicities, Wolchok says. A patient's comorbidities and expectations also need to be taken into account, he adds. This combination represents an opportunity to weigh risk and benefit on an individual patient basis, he says.
Views: 503 OncLiveTV
Cure for advanced melanoma: drugs found to treat deadly skin cancer
 
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Sign up for a free trial of News Direct's animated news graphics at http://newsdirect.nma.com.tw/Reuters.aspx For story suggestions please contact tips@nma.com.tw Breakthrough new drugs have been found to cure skin cancer. Scientists who presented their findings to the European Cancer Congress in Amsterdam on Saturday said the drugs were the "beginning of a new era" and hailed them as having "spectacular" effects in terminally ill melanoma patients. The new treatment involves two types of drugs, ipilimumab(ipi) and anti-PD1s. Ipilimumab is a new type of drug called a "monoclonal antibody," an antibody that recognises and attaches to a specific protein found on certain cells. Ipilimumab recognises CTLA-4, a protein on the surface of a kind of immune system cell called T cells. This protein usually slows the activity of T cells, but ipilimumab stops it from doing this. This makes the T cells more prone to attack and kill cancer cells. According to an article published on the UK's National Health Service website: "The current study reported that half of patients treated with ipilimumab survived to 11.4 months, about one in five patients lived to three years, with most of these patients going on to live to 10 years." It is believed that perhaps half of all patients could be "clinically cured" by combining ipilimumab with another new type of drug called anti-PD1s, which break down the defences of cancer cells and are still in clinical trials. "[Advanced] melanoma could become a curable disease for perhaps more than 50 per cent of patients within five to 10 years," Professor Alexander Eggermont of the Institut Gustave Roussy in France told the Mail on Sunday. "If I'd made this bizarre prediction five years ago, people would have said I was mad. But it now looks like we are going to have control of advanced melanoma for years, in a substantial proportion of patients." Advanced melanoma is diagnosed when the disease has spread and can no longer be surgically removed. Patients with advanced melanoma usually have low survival rates with few treatment options available. The new treatment brings hope to thousands of people with the disease. Scientists are conducting trials using the drugs to treat lung and kidney cancer.
Views: 6413 News Direct
Dr. Hoos Discusses Key Points of the Ipilimumab Trial
 
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Axel Hoos, MD, PhD, the Medical Lead in Immunology/Oncology at Bristol-Myers Squibb Discusses Key Points of the Ipilimumab Trial
Views: 136 OncLiveTV
Dr. Luke Discusses the Controversy Surrounding Ipilimumab/Nivolumab Combo in Melanoma
 
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Jason J. Luke, MD, assistant professor of Medicine, The University of Chicago Medicine, discusses the controversy surrounding the combination of nivolumab (Opdivo) and ipilimumab (Yervoy) in treatment-naïve patients with advanced melanoma, which was explored in the CheckMate-067 trial, during the AACR Annual Meeting.   The combination gained regulatory approval based on response rate and progression-free survival, with the assumption that those results would translate to overall survival (OS), Luke explains. Results of the CheckMate-067 study, reported at AACR, confirmed there was a 12% improvement in OS, however, there is still a question of whether the OS improvement justifies the extreme increase in toxicity with the addition of ipilimumab, relative to PD-1 monotherapy.   While doctors continue to have differing opinions on the subject, Luke says his group is interested in exploring how to maximize benefit and minimize toxicity. One possible way to do this is with IDO inhibitor combinations, Luke says, for example, leading in with a PD-1 combination with high efficacy and low toxicity, and then using a CTLA-4 or ipilimumab-based regimen in the second-line setting if a patient progresses.
Views: 1334 OncLiveTV
Immunotherapy Drug More Effective than Another in Treating Melanoma
 
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Dr. Jeffrey Weber explains the key findings of an international clinical trial comparing nivolumab and ipilimumab, which show the superiority of nivolumab in effectiveness and safety. Learn more about this study: http://nyulangone.org/press-releases/alternative-immunotherapy-drug-more-effective-than-current-standard-of-care-in-treating-advanced-melanoma-after-surgical-removal-of-disease Learn more about Dr. Weber: http://nyulangone.org/doctors/1053348706/jeffrey-s-weber Learn more about Perlmutter Cancer Center: http://nyulangone.org/locations/perlmutter-cancer-center
Views: 179 NYU Langone Health
WHAT IS NIVOLUMAB (OPTIVO)? [VLOG 21]
 
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What is Nivolumab?, What is Optivo? Watch this short Vid for a Brief explanation what the Immunotherapy drug Nivolumab / Optivo is and how it works from a patients perspective.
Views: 144 Jahmons Daze
UCLA's Dr. Antoni Ribas Discusses PD1 and PD-L1 Targeted Cancer Drugs
 
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Antoni Ribas, M.D. of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center is involved in trials testing new cancer drugs targeting the cell surface molecule called PD-L1, and the immune cell receptors PD1. Early data from these trails involving non-small cell lung cancer, renal cancer and melanoma have demonstrated impressive results that can lead to new treatments for the disease. In the video interview, Dr. Ribas explains the trial test data published so far, and previews new data to be seen at the upcoming American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting.
Views: 4736 UCLAJCCC
The immune system vs. cancer | Jedd Wolchok | TEDxTimesSquare
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. When you hear of a leader changing the way millions of people look at a problem. Especially a problem like cancer, then you know they are pushing boundaries. As Chief of Melanoma and Immunotherapy at Memorial Sloan Kettering, Dr. Wolcchok is the lead Investigator looking at ways to unlock the Immune System to fight cancer. Dr. Wolchok is currently Chief of the Melanoma and Immunotherapeutics Service, Associate Attending Physician at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) with an expertise in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. His additional appointments include: Head of the Swim Across America Laboratory, one of the foremost immunotherapy and melanoma research groups in the country; Associate Director of the Ludwig Center for Cancer Immunotherapy. Dr. Wolchok has helped establish MSKCC as a leader in the discovery and treatment of cancers with novel immunotherapies. Dr. Wolchok was instrumental in the clinical development leading to the approval of ipilimumab for advanced melanoma. He also leads the MSKCC Immune Monitoring Facility, a world-renowned full-time core dedicated to the pre-clinical and clinical cellular, serological and pathological monitoring of clinical trials of new immunotherapeutic approaches. Currently, he is Principal Investigator of numerous ongoing clinical trials at MSKCC in the area of immunotherapy. In addition, I supervise an R01-funded basic science laboratory which is focused on investigating novel immunotherapeutic agents in pre-clinical mouse models. In 2011, I established the Immunotherapeutics Clinical Core, a specialized phase 1-2 outpatient unit at MSKCC that is focused on the conduct of novel immunotherapy trials, with a specific emphasis on pharmacodynamic biomarker identification. This group treats patients with a broad spectrum of malignancies. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 43853 TEDx Talks
Dr Hans Hammers discusses the clinical trial of nivolumab plus ipilimumab in renal cell carcinoma
 
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At the Thirteenth International Kidney Cancer Symposium, Dr Hans Hammers (Johns Hopkins, MD) discusses the Phase 1 clinical trial that studied the immune checkpoint inhibitors, nivolumab and ipilimumab, in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The primary endpoint was to access safety and tolerability, and the secondary endpoint was to access efficacy. Overall, side effects were manageable and objective response was greater than previously reported with nivolumab monotherapy. These findings directed a subsequent Phase 3 trial.
Dr. Ribas Discusses the Efficacy of Ipilimumab for the Treatment of Melanoma
 
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Antoni Ribas, MD, PhD, the director of the Tumor Immunology Program Area at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, discusses the efficacy of ipilimumab for the treatment of melanoma. For more resources and information regarding anticancer targeted therapies: http://targetedonc.com/
Views: 90 Targeted Oncology
Insidermedicine In Depth - August 18, 2010 - Ipilimumab
 
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A drug that activates the immune system known as ipilimumab appears to prolong overall survival rates among patients with metastatic melanoma, with or without the addition of a vaccine that also stimulates immune activity. The research is published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Here is some information about melanoma: • It is the most dangerous form of skin cancer • Recognized early, it is nearly 100% curable • Left to advance and metastasize, it can be deadly Researchers from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute randomly assigned patients with advanced, metastatic melanoma whose condition continued to progress despite standard treatment to receive ipilimumab plus a vaccine known as glycoprotein or gp100, ipilimumab plus a placebo, or gp100 plus a placebo. Those receiving ipilimumab, with or without the gp100 vaccine, lived an average of about 10 months, while those who received gp100 alone lived an average of about six-and-a-half months. Severe immune system-related side effects were more common in patients receiving ipilimumab, however. Today's research provides hope that a drug has finally been found that can prolong survival rates among those with advanced metastatic melanoma
Views: 704 insidermedicine
Dr Jedd Wolchok Joins World News To Discuss The New Cancer Treatment Breakthrough
 
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Dr Jedd Wolchok from Memorial Sloan Kettering in New York, joins Sky News to talk about the new cancer treatment Immunotherapy and drugs Ipilimumab & Nivolumab that are offering hope to millions of people who suffer from the disease. How they kill off the cancer cells and what cancer patients could benefit from it. SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more great videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews For more great content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: iPad https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/Sky-News-for-iPad/id422583124 iPhone https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-news/id316391924?mt=8 Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bskyb.skynews.android&hl=en_GB
Views: 610 Sky News
Dr. Wolchok on the Safety Profile in CheckMate-067 in Melanoma
 
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Jedd D. Wolchok, MD, PhD, chief, Melanoma and Immunotherapeutics Service, Department of Medicine and Ludwig Center at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, discusses the safety profile in the CheckMate-067 trial, which examined nivolumab (Opdivo) combined with ipilimumab (Yervoy) in treatment-naïve patients with advanced melanoma. It is important to emphasize to patients that stopping treatment is not necessarily bad, says Wolchok. While the usual approach to cancer therapy does advocate a "more is better" mindset, that is not necessarily the case when it comes to immunotherapy. The data from CheckMate-067 showed that patients who had to stop treatment due to toxicity from the combination therapy actually achieved a significantly higher response rate of 68%. Thus, it is not clear that stopping treatment is bad for patients, and it may in fact be an indicator of better outcomes, explains Wolchok.
Views: 165 OncLiveTV
Success for ipilimumab and nivolumab combo in advanced melanoma
 
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Visit http://www.ecancer.org for more. Prof Sznol talks to ecancertv at ASCO 2014 about the results from an expanded phase I study which show that concurrent treatment with immunotherapy drugs ipilimumab and nivolumab produces an unprecedented median survival of roughly three and a half years (40 months) for patients with advanced melanoma. ecancer's filming at ASCO has been kindly supported by Amgen through the ECMS Foundation. ecancer is editorially independent and there is no influence over content.
Views: 428 ecancer
Lambrolizumab: Melanoma Drug Unavailable In Australia I The Feed
 
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Lambrolizumab is called a 'melanoma wonder drug' - and it's get to be approved in Australia. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SBS2Australia Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheFeedSBS2 Tumblr: http://sbs2australia.tumblr.com/
Views: 720 The Feed
Ipilimumab Side Effect Management in Melanoma
 
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Panelists discuss the importance of education on proper side effect management with ipilimumab, particularly since experience levels with the drug tend to vary greatly in community settings. To view more from this discussion, visit http://www.onclive.com/peer-exchange/metastatic-melanoma
Views: 1176 OncLiveTV
Results of CheckMate 039 trial of nivolumab in combination with ipilimumab for Hodgkin lymphoma
 
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Stephen Ansell, MD, PhD from the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN discusses the CheckMate 039 trial of nivolumab in combination with ipilimumab for patients with various B-cell malignancies, focusing on Hodgkin lymphoma (NCT01592370). Prof. Ansell explains that clinical trials with PD-1 blockade have proven very promising and they have been trying to build on these results by adding a second immune checkpoint agent called ipilimumab. Ipilimumab blocks CTLA-4 and the idea is to employ two different mechanisms that keep a T-cell activated. In Hodgkin lymphoma patients, the response rate was 74% even though many of these patients were heavily pre-treated. Further, the combination was well-tolerated. Recorded at the 2016 American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting, held in San Diego, CA.
Dr. Hodi on Nivolumab in Combination With Ipilimumab for Advanced Melanoma
 
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F. Stephen Hodi, MD, discusses the results of a trial presented at the 2015 AACR Annual Meeting. More from AACR: http://www.onclive.com/conference-coverage/aacr-2015
Views: 506 OncLiveTV
ESMO 2017 Highlights in Genitourinary Cancers: Treatment Advances
 
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Bernard Escudier explains the results from the practice changing CheckMate 214 study that supports the use of combined nivolumab plus ipilimumab as a potential first-line treatment for patients with intermediate/poor risk metastatic renal cell carcinoma, particularly those patients having tumour PD-L1 expression ≥1%. Stephane Oudard comments on great advances presented during the ESMO 2017 Congress in prostate and bladder cancer. He said that adding abiraterone to the standard therapy for patients with high risk non-metastatic prostate cancer may become the standard of care (STAMPEDE study). Claire Vale reports on a meta-analysis from 6 trials exploring what the optimal systemic treatments are in patients with hormone positive metastatic prostate cancer, and shows that AAP is likely to be the optimal treatment in this setting. Daniel Petrylak presents the results from the RANGE study which addresses whether the addition of an antiangiogenesis agent, ramucirumab, improves PFS in patients treated with docetaxel based chemotherapy with metastatic urothelial adenocarcinoma who have failed one previous platinum based chemotherapy regimen. The combination resulted in nearly doubling the objective response rate with no more toxicity than in the control arm. Abstracts LBA5 - Escudier B, et al. CheckMate 214: Efficacy and safety of nivolumab + ipilimumab (N+I) v sunitinib (S) for treatment-naïve advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), including IMDC risk and PD-L1 expression subgroups. LBA34 - Adding abiraterone for patients (pts) with high-risk prostate cancer (PCa) starting long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT): Outcomes in non-metastatic (M0) patients from STAMPEDE (NCT00268476) LBA33 - What are the optimal systemic treatments for men with metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer? A STOPCaP systematic review and network meta-analysis LBA4_PR - RANGE: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 study of docetaxel (DOC) with or without ramucirumab (RAM) in platinum-refractory advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma Produced by the European Society for Medical Oncology http://www.esmo.org
The Future of Cancer Immunotherapy: Combination Treatments
 
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http://cancerGRACE.org/ Immunotherapy Forum Video #29: In part 2 of 2, Dr. Jason Luke discusses treating cancer with immunotherapy and another drug, such chemotherapy or targeted therapies, as well as what we know about biomarkers that predict if an immunotherapeutic will work.
Dr. Hoos Describes Ipilimumab and Future Immunotherapies
 
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Axel Hoos, MD, PhD, the medical lead in Immunology/Oncology at Bristol-Myers Squibb discusses ipilimumab (Yervoy) and how it is a first-in-class agent that enhances activation of T cells. He elaborates that Bristol-Myers Squibb plans to build upon this success with their new drug the anti-PD-1 agent MDX-1106.
Views: 282 OncLiveTV
Nivolumab plus ipilimumab continues to improve OS, PFS at 2 years in patients with advanced melanoma
 
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Michael Postow, MD & Medical Oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center discusses initial report of overall survival rates from a randomized phase II trial evaluating the combination of nivolumab and ipilimumab in patients with advanced melanoma at the American Association of Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016 (AACR16). MDLinx Conference Coverage - American Association of Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2016: http://www.mdlinx.com/oncology/conference-interview/american-association-of-cancer-research-annual-meeting-2016/231097 MDLinx: http://www.mdlinx.com/ Smartest Doc & Board Exam Prep: http://www.thesmartestdoc.com/ M3 USA: http://usa.m3.com/ Follow MDLinx: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/MDLinx Twitter - https://twitter.com/MDLinx Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+Mdlinx/
Views: 246 MDLinx
Nivolumab, Ipilimumab in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer
 
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Dr. Michael Overman discusses his findings at the ASCO 2016 meeting in Chicago.
Dr. McKay on FDA Approval of Nivolumab/Ipilimumab in Frontline RCC
 
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Rana R. McKay, MD, assistant professor of medicine and medical oncologist at the University of California, San Diego, discusses the FDA approval of nivolumab (Opdivo) combined with ipilimumab (Yervoy) in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
Views: 111 OncLiveTV
Dr. Hoos on the Ipilimumab Plus Dacarbazine Combination Trial
 
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Axel Hoos, MD, PhD, the medical lead in Immunology/Oncology at Bristol-Myers Squibb, elaborates on the trial comparing ipilimumab (Yervoy) plus dacarbazine to dacarbazine plus placebo, labeled study 024. The results demonstrated a significant survival benefit for patients with previously untreated metastatic melanoma (primary endpoint of the trial was overall survival). The FDA approval of ipilimumab in March included an indication for pretreated and untreated metastatic melanoma patients. The findings from this trial further support this indication solidifying ipilimumab's role as a first-line therapy in metastatic melanoma.
Views: 268 OncLiveTV
Advancing the Next Wave in Cancer Treatment
 
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At age 22, Sharon Belvin learned she had a deadly form of skin cancer (metastatic melanoma) that had spread throughout her body. Treatment with an experimental immunotherapy, an antibody called ipilimumab, saved her life. The Cancer Research Institute is dedicating to harnessing the power of the immune system to treat, control, and prevent cancer. With more support, we can help to create new immunotherapies like the one Sharon received to help save the lives of more patients with cancer. Donate to cancer research now: http://www.cancerresearch.org/give
Will Immunotherapy Cancer Treatment Work for You?
 
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While immunotherapy is a relatively new cancer treatment that uses the immune system to fight the cancer, this treatment works better on certain forms of cancer. Using immunotherapy as a cancer treatment will depend on the type of cancer you have, as well as if you have any pre-existing medical conditions. In this video, oncologist Dr. Stephen Lemon discusses what types of cancers immunotherapy may treat, including some of the more common types of immunotherapy drugs, such as Yervoy, Opdivo, Keytruda, and Tecentriq. If immunotherapy is currently not approved for your type of cancer, you may still be able to get it in a clinical trial if your first treatments work. Ask your doctor if any new clinical trials are testing out new immunotherapy treatments for your cancer type. Stephen Lemon MD is a medical oncologist at the Overlake Hospital Cancer Treatment Center in Bellevue, WA. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Will Immunotherapy Cancer Treatment Work for Me? (video transcript) A patient (or you) is a good candidate for immunotherapy if he or she has been diagnosed with one of these cancers: Non Small Cell Lung Cancer Malignant Melanoma Kidney Cancer Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer Bladder Cancer Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma The cancers need to have spread, except for melanoma. Immunotherapy is approved for early stage treatment in melanoma, but not in the other cancers at this time Here are four commonly used immunotherapy drugs: (Yervoy) (Opdivo) (Keytruda) (Tecentriq) Yervoy works to stimulate the immune system to find the cancer. It was the first immune checkpoint inhibitor to be approved based upon its ability to prolong survival in patients with metastatic melanoma All four of these immunotherapy drugs work to stimulate the immune system by blocking various proteins. When the proteins are blocked, the immune system is unleashed to kill the cancer. Now let’s talk about which drugs are used to treat particular cancers In Non Small Cell Lung Cancer, Keytruda can be used either as the initial treatment, or after if traditional chemotherapy doesn’t work. Opdivo and Tecentriq can be used after traditional chemotherapy doesn’t work. In malignant melanoma, Yervoy can be used by itself or in combination with Opdivo for treatment of patients with unresectable melanoma. Unresectable means the cancer cannot be removed by surgery. Yervoy can also be used after surgery for high-risk melanoma patients. Opdivo and Keytruda can be used individually in the initial treatment of advanced or metastatic melanoma. For the treatment of kidney cancer, Opdivo can be used if the cancer gets worse after treatment with a blood vessel interfering drug, also known as anti-angiogenic treatment. In Head and Neck squamous cell cancer, both Opdivo and Keytruda can be used after the failure of traditional chemotherapy for advanced or metastatic disease. In bladder cancer, both Opdivo and Tecentriq can also be used after the failure of traditional chemotherapy. Tecentriq may also be used for patients who have had a cancer recurrence after traditional chemotherapy and surgery. In classical Hodgkin Lymphoma, Opdivo can be used after all other standard therapy is exhausted. Patients may have opportunities to participate in clinical trials of immunotherapy treatment, so if you have been diagnosed with cancer always check with your doctor to see if you would be eligible to participate in a research study. Not everyone is a good candidate for immunotherapy. For some patients immunotherapy is too risky because they may have a greater chance of life threatening side effects. For example, patients who are in very poor health, or who suffer from active autoimmune disease should not receive treatment. Immunotherapy cancer treatment is a scientific breakthrough that gives all of us hope that one day we won’t see cancer anymore!
Say No to Immunotherapy (Update 2017)
 
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Say No to Immunotherapy (Update 2017) Abstract: Immunotherapy does not cure cancer, and it barely induces remission. It is the most toxic treatment on the market. It is no better than traditional chemotherapy. I discuss a study on immunotherapy of melanoma. It is based on a surrogate endpoint which paves the way for a misleading interpretation of data . A new study published recently has exposed major flaws in the fast tracking of some drugs available to the American public without any stringent clinical evidence of their benefits. Many US patients with serious illnesses are being treated by drugs which have questionable data. [ ]drugs given "accelerated approval" by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) without any strong clinical evaluation. I discussed these flaws in several presentations: 1. Data manipulation with surrogate Endpoints 2. FDA approves flawed cancer drugs 3. Manipulation of Clinical Trial Results 4. Most new Oncology Drugs do not cure Cancer 5. Surrogate Endpoint Fallacy I discuss a study on immunotherapy of melanoma. It is based on a surrogate endpoint which paves the way for a misleading interpretation of data. Tumor size is a surrogate endpoint. Chemotherapy reduces tumor cell birth rate. Immunotherapy raises tumor cell death rate. Immunotherapy does not cure. It barely induces remission. Yet it is far more toxic than chemotherapy. Treatment with immunotherapies results in a unique and distinct spectrum of adverse events” These “adverse events” are grave diseases. Stay away from immunotherapy!
Views: 10389 Gershom Zajicek M.D,
Dr. Hoos Discusses Patients Eligible to Receive Ipilimumab
 
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Axel Hoos, MD, PhD, the medical lead in Immunology/Oncology at Bristol-Myers Squibb, discusses that the ipilimumab (Yervoy) label is very broad and includes both pretreated and untreated metastatic melanoma. No subset of patients has been identified that will not benefit from the drug. Evaluating prognostic information reveals that survival benefits has been found in all groups.
Views: 160 OncLiveTV