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Caring for Patients with Special Needs: Cognitive Impairment
 
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Cognitive impairment can be caused by a variety of conditions, commonly Alzheimer's Disease, multi-infarct dementia, and post-traumatic brain injury. This program describes how symptomatic conditions such as impaired awareness, memory, mood, and judgment affect providing care. Specific strategies for providing care to patients with dementia are demonstrated in an acute care setting, and the assessment of critical areas is discussed, including: communication, patient comfort, daily caregiving issues, discharge planning and follow up. After viewing this program, the learner should be able to: 1. Define cognition and cognitive functions. 2. Recognize cognitive impairment. 3. Know the causes of cognitive impairment ( Alzheimers disease, multi-infarct dementia, traumatic brain injury). 4. Know the effects of cognitive impairment on daily functions. 5. Know the impact of hospitalization on the cognitively impaired patient. 6. Be able to assess patient on admission. 7. Know nursing interventions for patients with cognitive impairment. 8. Be able to provide a safe and comforting environment by: preserving the patients functional status; preserving patient autonomy and sense of self-worth; and providing education for follow up needs. Program Info: Product ID: CLP026 Duration: 22:00 minutes Year: 2011 For more information about this program and other programs in this series, please click on the link below: https://www.heatinc.ca/caring-for-patients-with-special-needs-series/ This program is meant for previewing purposes only! Please contact Heat Inc. at sales@heatinc.ca or visit our website at www.heatinc.ca
11 Nurse Hacks   Saturated Fats
 
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Welcome to the Weekly Dose of Student Nurse Hacks. All the... Tips & tricks You NEED! TO pass NURSING school. 11. Saturated Fats PROBLEM: Diets high in saturated fats are linked to an increase in impaired concentration and memory & may be bogging down your grades SOLUTION: Avoid Milk, Butter, Cheese, Creams For 14 days Medical Daily believes that it causes a decreased sensitivity to Dopamine (the focus & feel good neurotransmitter) & high fat diet is also linked to depression Over 1,200+ Videos – http://simplenursing.com/products/ 80% NOT on Youtube Simplenursing.com Official website Over 60,000 Nursing Students Helped 82% or Higher Test Average from our Users Go to: http://SimpleNursing.com - Lab Card - ABGs - EKGs - Fluid & Electrolytes FREE - Pharmacology FREE - Cardiac Pathophysiology - PATHO BIBLE "70 Care Plans Done-For-You" Please visit: http://simplenursing.com/how-it-works/whats-included/ for more details on what is included with our memberships. Un-lock the mysteries of how simple nursing school can be.
Views: 506 Simple Nursing
Alcoholism - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
 
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What is alcoholism? Alcoholism, or alcohol use disorder, is when somebody has problems controlling their drinking, which cause various physiologic, psychologic, and social issues. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Study better with Osmosis Prime. Retain more of what you’re learning, gain a deeper understanding of key concepts, and feel more prepared for your courses and exams. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways and more when you follow us on social: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Thank you to our Patreon supporters: Alex Wright Omar Berrios Osmosis's Vision: Empowering the world’s caregivers with the best learning experience possible.
Views: 122470 Osmosis
Learning disability - definition, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
 
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What are learning disabilities? Learning disabilities are disorders where individuals have difficulty with reading, writing, or mathematics, called dyslexia, dysgraphia, and dyscalculia, respectively. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Study better with Osmosis Prime. Retain more of what you’re learning, gain a deeper understanding of key concepts, and feel more prepared for your courses and exams. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways and more when you follow us on social: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Thank you to our Patreon supporters: Alex Wright Omar Berrios Osmosis's Vision: Empowering the world’s caregivers with the best learning experience possible.
Views: 60331 Osmosis
Improving Dementia Care in Nursing Homes:  Best Care Practices
 
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Morris Kaplan, Operating Partner of Gwynedd Square Nursing Center, shares how his nursing home has been successful in improving the care of persons with dementia through non-pharmacological, individualized approaches. We accept comments in the spirit of our comment policy: http://newmedia.hhs.gov/standards/comment_policy.html As well, please view the HHS Privacy Policy: http://www.hhs.gov/Privacy.html
Views: 13966 CMSHHSgov
Geriatric Competent Care Webinar: Presentation and Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease
 
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Title: Presentation and Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease Description: This webinar presents core competencies needed for the assessment and diagnosis of cognitive impairment in older adults. Common clinical case presentations of memory problems are subtle in onset, often with a lack of patient awareness, which can result in under-diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, and a delay in care management. In addition, normal age-related changes in memory may be misdiagnosed as dementia. The prevalence of dementia in late life is age-related, increasing particularly after age 85. The different causes of dementia include vascular disease and Lewy body dementia, with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) the most common cause for late-life progressive cognitive decline. Primary care providers can, in most cases, accurately assess cognitive changes. The assessment process includes a careful history, physical examination, functional, cognitive, and social/economic assessments, and selected laboratory and radiological tests. Effectively communicating the diagnosis to patients and their family/caregivers is a critical part of the diagnostic process. Webinar Presenters: •Chris Callahan, MD, Professor, Department of Medicine, Indiana University; Director of Indiana University Center for Aging Research •Beth Galik, PhD, CRNP, Associate Professor, School of Nursing, University of Maryland; Robert Wood Johnson Nurse Faculty Scholar •Irene Moore, MSW, LISW-S, Professor of Family and Community Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine Learning Objectives: •Identify at least three major causes of progressive dementias in older adults. •Demonstrate knowledge of at least one tool used to assess cognitive functioning. •Outline some key elements of a social assessment that may inform a comprehensive evaluation of dementia.
Substance Use Disorder in Nursing
 
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Substance Use Disorder in Nursing tackles one of the most serious problems facing nursing today. The video provides a comprehensive look at the issue of substance use disorder and covers: • The facts about substance use disorder • Substance use disorder and nurses • Identification and reporting • Investigation and intervention for the nurse manager • Treatment and alternative to discipline programs • Recovery and return to practice Find other resources on the issue of substance use disorder in nursing at www.ncsbn.org/sud. ID=EDU009
Views: 28594 NCSBNInteract
Dissociative disorders - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
 
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What are dissociative disorders? Dissociative disorders are when an individual feels as if they're outside they're own body. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Study better with Osmosis Prime. Retain more of what you’re learning, gain a deeper understanding of key concepts, and feel more prepared for your courses and exams. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways and more when you follow us on social: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Thank you to our Patreon supporters: Sumant Nanduri Omar Berrios Alex Wright Sabrina Wong Suzanne Peek Arfan Azam Mingli Féng Osmosis's Vision: Empowering the world’s caregivers with the best learning experience possible.
Views: 77121 Osmosis
What is Mild Cognitive Impairment?
 
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Mild Cognitive Impairment often, but not always, leads to Alzheimer's.
Views: 16551 Emory University
Presentation And Diagnosis Of Alzheimer's Disease
 
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This webinar presents core competencies needed for the assessment and diagnosis of cognitive impairment in older adults. Common clinical case presentations of memory problems are subtle in onset, often with a lack of patient awareness, which can result in under-diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias, and a delay in care management. In addition, normal age-related changes in memory may be misdiagnosed as dementia. The prevalence of dementia in late life is age-related, increasing particularly after age 85. The different causes of dementia include vascular disease and Lewy body dementia, with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) the most common cause for late-life progressive cognitive decline. Primary care providers can, in most cases, accurately assess cognitive changes. The assessment process includes a careful history, physical examination, functional, cognitive, and social/economic assessments, and selected laboratory and radiological tests. Effectively communicating the diagnosis to patients and their family/caregivers is a critical part of the diagnostic process. Topics to be covered include: Dementia (major neurocognitive disorder) definition Epidemiology and impact Causes of dementia Pathology and possible causes/risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) Genetics of Alzheimer’s disease Differential diagnosis Common presentations – case finding Assessment Diagnostic criteria Communicating the diagnosis to patients and their families/caregivers
Fluid and Electrolytes easy memorization trick. Part 4
 
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Over 1,200+ Videos – http://simplenursing.com/products/ 80% NOT on Youtube Simplenursing.com Official website Over 60,000 Nursing Students Helped 82% or Higher Test Average from our Users Go to: http://SimpleNursing.com - Lab Card - ABGs - EKGs - Fluid & Electrolytes FREE - Pharmacology FREE - Cardiac Pathophysiology - PATHO BIBLE "70 Care Plans Done-For-You" Please visit: http://simplenursing.com/how-it-works/whats-included/ for more details on what is included with our memberships. Un-lock the mysteries of how simple nursing school can be.
Views: 504928 Simple Nursing
Alzheimer's disease - plaques, tangles, causes, symptoms & pathology
 
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What is Alzheimer's disease? Alzeimer's (Alzheimer) disease is a neurodegenerative disease that leads to symptoms of dementia. Progression of Alzheimer's disease is thought to involve an accumulation of beta-amyloid plaque and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Study better with Osmosis Prime. Retain more of what you’re learning, gain a deeper understanding of key concepts, and feel more prepared for your courses and exams. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways and more when you follow us on social: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Osmosis's Vision: Empowering the world’s caregivers with the best learning experience possible.
Views: 367699 Osmosis
Stages of dementia and Alzheimer's disease | Mental health | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Visit us (http://www.khanacademy.org/science/healthcare-and-medicine) for health and medicine content or (http://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat) for MCAT related content. These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any Khan Academy video. Created by Tanner Marshall. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-mental-health/dementia-delirium-alzheimers-rn/v/diagnosis-of-dementia-and-alzheimers-disease?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-mental-health/dementia-delirium-alzheimers-rn/v/risk-factors-for-dementia?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 54792 khanacademymedicine
The Study of Memory Improvement and Memory Impairment
 
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There has been more than one study on how to improve memory and reasons for memory loss. Let's review some causes of impaired memory. Normally, once a person stops the use of the prescription drug that caused the amnesia, memory begins to improve. Even though you should always be aware of the side effects of any drug, it is possible that something new will develop that wasn't discovered in the study of the drug. ~131~
Views: 14 infoMay
Managing the Complexity of Nursing Work: Cognitive Stacking (QSEN Module 2)
 
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Teaching students to practice in today's healthcare system is challenging! Not only must they learn the content knowledge and skills required to provide care, they must also learn to manage the complexity of the clinical environment. Drawing on studies of how new and experienced nurses manage the complexity of their work, in this presentation Patricia Ebright describes the concept of stacking and how critical this process is to the preparation of new nurses to provision of safe, quality care. This video is part of "Managing the Complexity of Nursing Work: Cognitive Stacking" the second in a series of learning modules developed by the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) project. For more information, see www.qsen.org.
Views: 1781 QSEN Institute
Intervention Strategies for Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia
 
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In this video with goCognitive, Dr. Maureen Schmitter-Edgecombe of Washington State University explains the role of external aides and assistive technologies in the treatment of patients with mild cognitive impairments or dementia. The assistive technologies, ranging from memory notebooks to smart home environments, are used to address quality of life issues in patients.
Views: 4673 gocognitive
Clinical Management of Dementia
 
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This seminar provides tools for effective evaluation and therapeutic intervention with the dementia patient. Participants will learn to stage cognition and cognitive performance as well as utilize effective strategies to enhance independence, function, cooperation, and behavior reduction for the client with dementia. You will acquire new skills to enhance long-term care planning and help patients and families prepare for disease progression and future transitions in cognition. The skills and strategies taught in this seminar can be implemented into practice the very next day to provide better care and achieve better results with dementia patients.
Views: 350 HomeCEU
Helping Loved Ones with Memory Loss
 
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One in eight people suffer from either long term or short term memory loss. As doctors work to treat the patient they have some tips on how loved ones can also help. Anne Petrin, a memory care nurse practitioner with Lee Health, says it’s frustrating for patients who struggle to remember names, events, even everyday information. “I think the biggest thing is they feel like they’re not treated as a person anymore, they’re treated as a disease.” A memory loss diagnosis has big impacts on the patient and on their loved ones. “Realize that everybody’s trying their best and approach it with a deep breath, and a sense that we’re in this together and we’re going to make the best decisions possible. And I’m sorry goes a long way,” said Petrin. She says it’s important to make sure the patient is heard. “They deserve respect, they have opinions, and even though there’s memory impairment, or another type of impairment they have a right to express themselves.” Loved ones also need to let the patient speak for themselves. If they get stuck on a thought, instead of finishing it for them prompt them with a few questions. Most importantly, always try to be patient with them. “This isn’t a point of aggravation. They’re not repeating because they’re trying to get on your last nerve, but it’s truly a fault of the brain,” said Petrin. Make sure the patient is writing things down and keep them on a regular eating and sleeping schedule. “Have a routine as much as possible, schedule in things like exercise, schedule in things like brain games, schedule in things that are fun,” said Petrin. Loved ones can also ask their physician for guidance on how to best help the patient. View More Health Matters video segments at LeeHealth.org/Healthmatters/ Lee Health in Fort Myers, FL is the largest network of health care facilities in Southwest Florida and is highly respected for its expertise, innovation and quality of care. For more than 100 years, we’ve been providing our community with personalized preventative health services and primary care to highly specialized care services and robotic assisted surgeries. Lee Health - Caring People. Inspiring Care. Visit LeeHealth.org
Views: 176 Lee Health
Geriatric Competent Care: Communication of Alzheimer's Diagnosis by Irene Moore
 
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This webinar presents some of the core competencies that are most fundamental to the assessment and diagnosis of cognitive impairment in older adults. The prevalence of dementia in late life is associated is age-related and becomes quite common after age 85 years. Common clinical case presentations of memory problems include subtle onset and lack of patient awareness. Normal age-related changes in memory, depression, and delirium and be misdiagnosed as dementia. The different causes of dementia include vascular disease and Lewy body dementia, with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) the most common cause for late-life progressive cognitive decline. Primary care providers can in most cases, accurately conduct the assessment of cognitive changes in late life. The assessment process includes a careful history, physical examination, functional, cognitive, and social/economic assessments, and selected laboratory and radiological tests. Effectively communicating the diagnosis to the patient and their family/caregivers is a critical part of the diagnostic process.
Creative Interventions for Dementia
 
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Many costs related to dementia include pharmaceutical interventions such as Acetylecholinasterase inhibitors and glutamate antagonists, that essentially preserve 6-9 months worth of cognition overall. Other costs are associated with pharmaceutical management of behaviors. There are a number of non-pharmaceutical and creative interventions for dementia that can delay progression of the disease, reduce incidence of injuries associated with falls, reduce sundowning behaviors and creative interventions for behaviors that could limit the utilization of restraint use such as chair alarms, your voice, merry walkers and chemicals. This course is designed to meet those goals.
Views: 679 HomeCEU
How to do the Mental Status Exam | Merck Manual Professional Version
 
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Learn more about assessing mental status: http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/neurologic-disorders/neurologic-examination/how-to-assess-mental-status This video shows an examiner assessing a patient’s mental status, including components such as orientation to time, place, and person, attention and concentration, memory, verbal and mathematical abilities, judgment, and reasoning. About the Merck Manuals: First published in 1899 as a small reference book for physicians and pharmacists, The Merck Manual grew in size and scope to become one of the world's most widely used comprehensive medical resources for professionals and consumers. As The Manual evolved, it continually expanded the reach and depth of its offerings to reflect the mission of providing the best medical information to a wide cross-section of users, including medical professionals and students, veterinarians and veterinary students, and consumers. • Merck Manual Professional Version: http://www.MerckManual.com/Professional • Facebook for Professionals: http://www.Facebook.com/MerckManualUS • Twitter for Professionals: http://www.Twitter.com/MerckManualPro Examiner: Gary Horowitz, DO. Department of Neurology, Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA
Views: 58609 Merck Manuals
ALZHEIMERS DISEASE Home Care Planning and Management
 
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Alzheimer's disease involves infiltration of tangles and plaques in the brain resulting to memory loss, cognitive impairment, gradual loss in body function, personality changes and progressive decline in over all well being. This short video contains excerpts from the book "Alzheimer's Disease: Home Care Planning and Management" by Solomon Barroa R.N. available at amazon.com in both kindle and paperback formats. Thank you for watching this short presentation.
Views: 120 solomon barroa
What Are The Differences Between DEMENTIA and ALZHEIMER'S Disease
 
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What Are The Differences Between DEMENTIA and ALZHEIMER'S Disease . Alzheimer’s disease and dementia are often used interchangeably as many people believe that one means the other. In fact, the distinction between the two diseases often causes confusion on the behalf of patients, families and caregivers. Discover how the two diagnoses, while related, are remarkably different. What Is The Difference Between Alzheimer's and Dementia? Alzheimer’s and dementia are still a mystery in many ways. This is why the two similar diseases are often mixed up in every day conversation and understanding. According to the National Institute on Aging (NIA), Dementia is a brain disorder that affects communication and performance of daily activities and Alzheimer’s disease is a form of dementia that specifically affects parts of the brain that control thought, memory and language. Read on to discover more particulars on how the two diseases vary and why there’s still a lot of scientific research needed—as well as public awareness—around these world-wide epidemics. What is dementia? Dementia is an umbrella term for a set of symptoms including impaired thinking and memory. It is a term that is often associated with the cognitive decline of aging. However, issues other than Alzheimer’s can cause dementia. Other common causes of dementia are Huntington’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. What is Alzheimer’s Disease? According to the Center for Disease Control, Alzheimer’s disease is a common cause of dementia causing as many as 50 to 70% of all dementia cases. In fact, Alzheimer’s is a very specific form of dementia. Symptoms of Alzheimer’s include impaired thought, impaired speech, and confusion. Doctors use a variety of screenings to determine the cause of dementia including blood tests, mental status evaluations and brain scans. How Are They Different? When a person is diagnosed with dementia, they are being diagnosed with a set of symptoms. This is similar to someone who has a sore throat. Their throat is sore but it is not known what is causing that particular symptom. It could be allergies, strep throat, or a common cold. Similarly, when someone has dementia they are experiencing symptoms without being told what is causing those symptoms. Another major difference between the two is that Alzheimer’s is not a reversible disease. It is degenerative and incurable at this time. Some forms of dementia, such as a drug interaction or a vitamin deficiency, are actually reversible or temporary. Once a cause of dementia is found appropriate treatment and counseling can begin. Until a proper diagnosis is made, the best approach to any dementia is engagement, communication and loving care. The Need for More Public Awareness and Research Funding While the differences between Alzheimer’s disease and dementia are clear to families dealing with the diseases, more public awareness is needed to differentiate between the two. Further understanding of what exactly causes Alzheimer’s disease will help to clear any confusion and hopefully lead to better treatments plans and, ultimately, a cure.
Views: 40867 Healthy Lifestyle
Mild cognitive impairment and driving
 
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Read my full article on mild cognitive impairment and driving, including my 6 tips for staying safe on the road: https://gocogno.com/mild-cognitive-impairment-and-driving/ If you've been diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment, you don't want to become a danger to yourself or others on the road. In many cases, people with MCI can continue to drive safely — sometimes for years. But it's question you want to consider carefully. Here's what you need to know to make the best decision for you. See all the Go Cogno Pathway videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLzmcxMVMH0tA2JoED3wlSVhNaYZB6Tm2t Visit the Go Cogno website: https://gocogno.com/ Follow me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TonyDearing6085/ Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tonydearing?lang=en Here is a transcript of this video: It’s a beautiful fall day here in New Jersey, and I’m headed out in a few minutes. I’ve got a doctor’s appointment, then I’m going to the grocery store, and then driving into Bernardsville to have lunch with my wife — all the kind of normal daily activities that we take for granted, until we face the possibility that someone is going to take the car keys away. For someone with mild cognitive impairment, that’s a real concern. Getting that diagnosis can be so shocking and frightening, and all sorts of worries race through your head. One of the first is likely to be, “Do I have to quit driving?” That’s a loaded question and one you want to consider carefully. But don’t assume the worst. In most cases, people with mild cognitive impairment can continue to drive safely — often for years. So let’s talk about why that is. Hi, my name is Tony Dearing. I write an award-winning column on brain health and prevention of dementia for NJ.com and Star-Ledger and I operate GoCogno.com, a website for people with mild cognitive impairment. If you’ve been diagnosed with MCI, you don’t want to become a danger to yourself or anyone else on the road. And speaking statistically, you probably aren’t. One recent study looked at 57 adults over the age of 65 with mild cognitive impairment, and compared them to 265 adults with normal memory for their age. What they found was the people with MCI scored slightly lower on driving tests, but the difference was insignificant, and both groups scored high enough to be considered safe drivers. Now that doesn’t mean that every person with mild cognitive impairment is safe to drive. But it really does underscore the difference between mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Because MCI is not dementia, and this is one case where there really is a difference. A person diagnosed with Alzheimer’s is going to have to stop driving fairly soon. They may potentially be able to drive for another year or two, but eventually they will have to give up the car keys. In fact, the concern is serious enough that your doctor would be required to report you to the state motor vehicle commission and you’d have to take a test and pass that driving test in order to continue to drive in the short term. Now with mild cognitive impairment, it’s completely different. Both the American and Canadian Medical Associations have taken the stance that mild cognitive impairment does not warrant a loss of driving privileges. In fact, unlike a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s, if you have MCI, neither you or your doctors is even required to report that to the state. Now you still need to make a decision that’s right for you. And to help you do that, I invite you to go to my site, GoCogno.com, where I have published an article with safety tips for driving with MCI. This will help show you how you can continue to drive safely and also help you know when it may be time to consider giving up the keys. Another thing that’s important to understand is that in most cases, signs that your driving ability is slipping occur long before you are likely to be involved in any serious accident. So if you know what those signs are and you can recognize them, that’s another way to stay safe and be comfortable and secure on the road. I’ve put together a list of 20 of those common warning signs and if it’s helpful, I’d be glad to send it to you. Send me an email to tonydearing@gocogno.com and I’ll be glad to send you that list of 20 common warning signs. So I hope you’ve found this helpful, and sorry, but I am going to sign off now. I’ve got to get to my doctor’s appointment. But thanks for joining me today, and I’ll hope to see you again next week. Until then, as always, be kind to your mind. This site is educational, and is not intended as medical advice. It offers information about lifestyle choices that have been proven to help protect cognition. Always consult your doctor before making changes that can impact your health.
Views: 285 GoCogno.com
What is Meningitis, GNM, BSc Nursing Medical Surgical Nursing, Gurukpo
 
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Ms. Sushila Choudhary, Assistant Professor, Biyani Groups of colleges, Jaipur explains about Meningitis. It is the inflammation of meningis of the brain in which patient’s memory is impaired and permanent death can occur if proper interventions are not taken. www.gurukpo.com, www.biyanicolleges.org
Views: 1353 Guru Kpo
The Woodlands Specialized Memory Care Unit: Comfort Corner
 
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Please read below for more information! The Woodlands Health and Rehab Center now has a specialized and secured Memory Care Unit, named Comfort Corner, which is the only dedicated unit in a skilled nursing facility in Ravenna. Our unit has a comfortable and home like atmosphere that is also functional for the memory-impaired person with a large open space, dining/activities area, Memory Care Life Stations and decorations suited for people with dementia. In addition each dedicated staff member working on the unit goes through 9 hours of training related to Memory Care. Our 25 bed unit has a LPN program director who has many years of experience working with people with Memory Care challenges. Our low staff to patient ratios will help to support the need for additional activities in the evening hours when “sun downing” may occur, as this is a time when residents tend to have greater care needs. The Woodlands now offers 3 different levels of care including skilled nursing/Rehabilitation including Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapy, Long Term Care and now specialized memory care. Another important factor to consider is how to pay for memory care services in a facility. Many Assisted Living facilities are private pay only. The Woodlands accepts Medicare, many insurance plans, private pay and Medicaid and are gladly willing to assist families to apply for Ohio Medicaid and help navigate the process through approval. If you would like additional information or are interested in an individualized tour please contact us at 330-297-4564 or email inquiries@g5search.com. Thank you for exploring Comfort Corner at The Woodlands Health and Rehab today!
Assessment and Non Pharmacological Interventions
 
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Assessment and Non Pharmacological Interventions
Views: 797 ORGovDHS
Dolan Memory Care Homes - Alternative to medical model
 
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Group home environment provides support and care for persons with memory impairment due to Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. Homes are based on clinical research and are safe and secure. Licensed by the state and staffed 24 hours a day.
Views: 154 Tim Dolan
Holistic Dementia Care Solutions - Conversations in Care
 
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Many individuals with a dementia diagnosis may benefit from medication. Keep in Mind understands how all individuals with dementia benefit from a holistic approach to care. Keep in Mind offers both caregiver training and resources. Celebrated for her tireless advocacy for those with memory impairment, Ellen’s holistic approach to dementia care evolved after years of boots-on-the-ground service.   Keep in Mind follows a 'four pillar' holistic philosophy for dementia care as it recognizes Environment, Communication, Nutrition and Activity Engagement. Join me for a captivating conversation with Ellen!
Let's talk about better design ideas for Alzheimer's
 
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Interior design can be a powerful tool to helping everyone live better, whether it's designing for Alzheimer's, babies, or the rest of us quirky humans. Theresa's dad has Alzheimer's. A few months ago, her family decided that to help preserve the health and vibrancy of her mom, it was time to move dad into a memory care facility. Her parents had lived together for 47+ years, so it wasn't a decision made lightly. Throughout the process of watching her dad become confused about things that used to come so naturally, and witnessing attempts by her mother and now the care facility to make his daily life easier, Theresa kept coming back to one simple question: How can designers help caregivers extend the time at home for a family member with Alzheimer's? After much painstaking research, there isn't an obvious conversation happening in the design community about Alzheimer's and dementia. So on this episode of MyFixitUpLife talk, Theresa is sharing a quick tour of the common area at her dad's memory care facility, and talking with a few experts to explore how designers can reach into their bag of essentials (color, pattern, texture, shine, shape, layout) to make a difference for families. Someone is diagnosed with Alzheimer's every 67 seconds and it's the 6th leading cause of deaths in the U.S., so we're betting that this is a conversation that affects most all of us personally. Marilucy Lopes is talking about how caregivers can modify the home environment, from painting black on doors that shouldn't be opened to using familiar elements from hobbies and family photos to help trigger memories. Lisa Burkholder from the Alzheimer's association's Delaware valley chapter is sharing why pattern can cause fear and confusion, about how including nature into the environment can be soothing, and how to connect with other families through the walk. Mitzi Beach explores how color can both create order and confusion for someone who is memory impaired. Mitzi and Theresa are talking about how there is a parallel between caring for an Alzheimer's patient and a baby. There are tons of resources on how to baby-proof a home, but we are at a loss for resources when it comes to designing for Alzheimer's.
Views: 12412 MyFixitUpLife
Schizophrenia treatment | Mental health | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Visit us (http://www.khanacademy.org/science/healthcare-and-medicine) for health and medicine content or (http://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat) for MCAT related content. These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any Khan Academy video. Created by Tanner Marshall. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-mental-health/psychotic-disorders-rn/v/schizoaffective-disorder?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-mental-health/psychotic-disorders-rn/v/schizophrenia-diagnosis?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 50352 khanacademymedicine
What Is Mild Cognitive Impairment?
 
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There is some disagreement amongst physicians mild cognitive impairment a condition that falls somewhere between normal age related memory loss and alzheimer's disease or similar 26 jul 2016 in (mci), the changes cognition exceeds normal, expected to. Signs, symptoms, & diagnosis mild cognitive impairment (mci) is a disorder that has been associated with risk for alzheimer's disease. Rudolf kohoutek,cscvznam mild cognitive impairment is a type of memory loss that may or not precede alzheimer's what impairment? People with (mci) have problems memory, language, thinking judgement are greater sometimes mci called 'early disease', although does always progress to. Coping with mild cognitive impairment the new york times. What is mild cognitive impairment (mci)? Cognitive neurology and. It then looks at reducing your risk of mild cognitive impairment (mci) is a condition in which someone has minor problems with cognition their mental abilities such as memory or thinking. However 10 sep 2012 about to 15 percent of adults age 65 and older are believed have mild cognitive impairment a condition commonly characterized by read medical definition. Learn about cognition impairment, amnestic mci, and 16 jun 2016 mild cognitive impairment (mci) is an intermediate stage between the expected decline of normal aging more serious some people with memory problems have a condition called or mcithe type most associated 6 slight in one's ability to think clearly. In mci in contrast to alzheimer's where other cognitive skills are affected, mild impairment (mci) is defined by deficits memory that do not significantly 4 apr 2017 (mci), you have more and thinking problems than others your age, but they don't interfere with refers a condition which there decline one's usual abilities e. Medical definition of mild cognitive impairment medicinenet. As mci has only recently been defined, there is limited research on it and much that we do not mild cognitive impairment (zkratka mci). Mild cognitive impairment alzheimer society of canada. What is mild cognitive impairment? Next avenue. Mild cognitive impairment (mci) vsmild mild practice essentials, overview what is impairment? . Learn about mci symptoms and causes mild cognitive impairment is a brain function syndrome involving the onset evolution of impairments beyond those expected based on age this factsheet explains link between dementia, benefits having diagnosed., (memory, language functions, reasoning) this has been termed mild cognitive impairment (mci). In one classification of mci, mild cognitive impairment (mci) is a condition that means there clear evidence problems, most often involving short term memory. Upozornn vloil uivatel prof. Mild cognitive impairment (mci) what you need to knowfactsheet is mild (mci)? Alzheimer's alzheimer's societyucsf memory and aging centermedlineplus. What is mild cognitive impairment? National institute on aging nih. Mild cognitive impairment (mci). Overview mild cognitive impairment mayo clinic. Signs, symptoms, & diagnosis. Mild cognitive impairment (zkratka mci) abz.
Views: 49 I Question You
Struggling with your decision to put your loved one in a dementia nursing home? Watch this.
 
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I AM SUPER EXCITED TO ANNOUNCE THAT I CREATED A CAREBLAZER SURVIVAL GUIDE! GET YOUR FREE COPY HERE: https://app.convertkit.com/landing_pages/366531?v=7 Today’s video is all about the struggles involved in deciding whether to place your loved one with dementia in a nursing home. No matter what type of dementia your loved one has (Alzheimer’s disease, Lewy Body dementia, or Frontotemporal dementia), there may come a time when you have to think about whether your loved one may need nursing home care. This is no easy decision and today’s video walks you through how a fellow careblazer came to terms with deciding to place her husband with dementia. ALSO I AM SUPER EXCITED TO ANNOUNCE THAT I CREATED A CAREBLAZER SURVIVAL GUIDE! TO GET YOUR FREE COPY CLICK THE LINK HERE: http://eepurl.com/cPG069 The 29 page guide should arrive in your inbox! Thanks for watching Careblazers TV! Episodes are posted weekly, every Sunday night. Make sure you don't miss out your weekly dose of dementia tips, strategies, and self care. Subscribe here:https://goo.gl/4WYvsh
Manorcare Skilled Nursing Rehab West Palm Beach Video Tour
 
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ManorCare - West Palm Beach treats people of all ages serving patients from surrounding cities like Palm Beach, Lake Park, Palm Beach Gardens, Rivera Beach, Singer Island, Wellington, West Palm Beach, Lake Worth and Greenacres. We focus our resources in areas where our patients need us most as they transition from hospital to home. We specialize in post-hospital rehabilitation services, respite care and long term care. Who is ManorCare Health Services West Palm Beach? ManorCare West Palm Beach is part of HCR ManorCare, a leader provider of post-hospital skilled nursing and rehabilitation services. Our comprehensive medical and rehabilitation services care for a wide variety of patients. Our short term rehabilitation programs treat patients transitioning between hospital and home for patients recovering from: Stroke and other neurological conditions Cardiac related illness Pulmonary impairment Amputation recovery Neuro-muscular deconditioning Post-surgical recovery Oncology care Orthopedic Injuries
Views: 1582 SilverCensusVideos
Whispering Oaks- Waverly Assisted Living Irvine CA | California | Assisted Living Memory | Care
 
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Call Us Today at (714) 459-9066 or go to http://www.CarePatrol.com. At Whispering Oaks your loved one is carefully cared for by a professional staff and experienced caregivers who are dedicated to serving their residents with dignity and love 24 hours a day. Our devoted staff provides the families and residents with the peace of mind and security they can rely on. Our outstanding 6 bed residential care home located in Irvine, California. Our multilingual speaking home provides transportation, medication assistance, showering assistance, incontinence care, dressing assistance, diabetes care, and general supervision. Your CarePatrol Senior Advisor has personally pre-screened and reviewed this residential care home's care and violation history and would be happy to share it with you on or before your tour. Whispering Oaks is licensed by the State of California to offer the utmost care and service. Whispering Oaks are gentle, comfortable home for like. We provide care for older adults with memory loss and specialize in Alzheimer's, dementia, cognitive impairment, post-stroke care, Parkinson's. You can feel the warmth when you walk in to our homes. Nestled in the heart of prestigious city of Irvine in close proximity to everything. Trained staff and also registered nurse on staff. State of the art tech including 24 hour video camera, wander lo-jack. Are you looking for the best senior care in Irvine but not sure where to start? You don't have to figure it out by yourself. CarePatrol can help guide your family through this challenging time. Every facility is personally visited by a CarePatrol Senior Consultant to provide choices in senior care facilities that will be the best fit. Each senior living facility that is recommended is checked for care and safety violations. A CarePatrol consultant will tour with you at the facilities so you can make sure you or your loved one will be cared for in the manner you desire. Best of all, the personalized service provided by each CarePatrol Senior Care Consultant is free to the family. CarePatrol is your guide to find assisted living in Irvine, CA. We are the free community senior care referral service in Irvine. CarePatrol can assist you and your family in finding quality, top rated Assisted Living, Independent Living, Memory Care, Nursing Homes and In Home Care.
Views: 54 CarePatrolVideo
Supporting medical professionals - The Good Care Group
 
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With over 600,000 elderly people in the UK living with a variety of health problems that constrain their lives and independence, the health sector faces many challenges when providing services to these individuals. Many elderly people are struggling with frailty and mobility issues that old age brings, compounded by other more specialist medical conditions, such as dementia and Parkinson's that dramatically affect their overall health, wellbeing and confidence. The majority of these individuals will always seek medical advice and place great pressures on our healthcare system. Whether you are a GP, hospital discharge planner or specialist medical clinician, we understand the challenges you face and our award winning, high quality home care service aims to reduce the burden on your clinical commitment, whilst improving the lives of your patients. At The Good Care Group we work closely with a number of healthcare professionals to ensure a holistic approach to care is delivered to our clients and the benefits to your patients from our service are far reaching -- whether your patient is recovering from a stroke, requires positive operative rehabilitation is living with memory impairment or dementia or simply has issues with day to day mobility and frailty, you can be assured that our professional carers support medical professionals by delivering an optimum plan of care that results in these conditions being effectively managed at home with speedy result that impact on their overall health and wellbeing -- at the same time reducing the burden on you and your commitment.
Views: 589 The Good Care Group
Adult Day Center / ReCharge!
 
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A fun video about the Adult Day Center and ReCharge! programs at Chai Point Senior Living in Milwaukee, WI. These programs, open to the general public, assist elderly people with functional impairment or memory loss. NOTE: There is no sound during the first 10 seconds of the video. Video created by Debra Zarne.
Views: 1228 dhzarne
Dementia Behaviour: A Management Challenge
 
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Dementia represents an increasing challenge for health care in Australia and an expected deficit in the dementia care workforce necessitates the need for training and more skilled management. There are now nearly 300,000 people in Australia living with dementia. By the year 2050 there will be almost one million. Current trends indicate about 1600 new cases of dementia each week. One in four people over the age of 85 now have dementia. Dementia is a broad term used to describe a group of conditions or symptoms that cause a progressive decline in a person's functioning, including memory loss and cognitive impairment. It is usually accompanied by changes in normal emotional reactions, as well as psychological and behavioural changes, such as depression, wandering, anxiety, hallucinations, aggression and disinhibition. This progressive decline presents particular problems for family and carers as well as primary health care professionals and the staff of aged care or specialist residential units. Managing dementia in any setting can be challenging and frustrating and usually requires well designed decision pathways and management strategies. In non-specialist settings delirium can often be confused with dementia and pharmacological treatment can present problems. This program takes a practical skills based approach to the challenge of dementia behaviour in various settings. It examines best practice strategies and principles for a range of behavioural and psychological dementia symptoms. It examines the issues for people in rural and remote Australia. Produced by the Rural Health Education Foundation http://www.rhef.com.au/
Views: 1352 Rural Health Channel
Dementia concept
 
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Dementia causes a loss of memory. People aren't able to recognize their own family. With connecting the family to music, the person who suffers from dementia will recognize them. This is because of the connection, music can make to memories.
Views: 142 M Junggeburth
Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health | Leonard & Jean Georges
 
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Keep Memory Alive presents Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health | Patient Leonard Georges and wife and caregiver Jean Georges Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health provides state-of-the-art care for cognitive disorders and for the family members of those who suffer from them. The physicians and staff at the Center for Brain Health continuously work towards the development of early diagnosis and the advancement of knowledge concerning mild cognitive disorders, which could one day delay or prevent their onset. Patients receive expert diagnosis and treatment at the Center for Brain Health, which offers a multidisciplinary patient-focused approach to diagnosis and treatment, promoting collaboration across all care providers, offering patients a complete continuum of care and infusing education and research into all that it does. The facility, designed by Frank Gehry, houses clinical space, a diagnostic center, neuroimaging rooms, physician offices, laboratories devoted to clinical research and the Keep Memory Alive Event Center. For more information, visit www.clevelandclinic.org/brainhealth. Keep Memory Alive, whose mission is to provide enhanced treatment and ultimately cures for patients and their families suffering from neurocognitive disorders, raises awareness and funds in support of the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health. By supporting Keep Memory Alive and its fight against neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Huntington's, Parkinson's, ALS and memory disorders of all kinds, we can ensure progress towards better treatments and ultimately cures will occur in Las Vegas. For additional information call (702) 263-9797 or visit www.keepmemoryalive.org.
Views: 229 Keep Memory Alive
Sleep and Risk for Cognitive Decline and Alzheimer's 3 of 6
 
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Obstructive Sleep Apnea Is Associated with Longitudinal Increases in Amyloid Burden in Elderly Mild Cognitive Impairment Individuals with Megan Hogan
Views: 261 actionalz
What is Dementia?
 
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What is Dementia? This week’s video looks at what is Dementia? Dementia is an umbrella term that is used to describe several diseases that lead to cognitive impairment and doesn’t have a cure. There are over 850,000 people in the UK that suffer from Dementia and these numbers are predicted to rise with the increasing ageing population. Dementia is often thought to be Alzheimer’s disease, however this is a misconception, Alzheimer’s disease is one of the several causes of Dementia. Dementia is a clinical syndrome with many causes, it can be defined as an acquired loss of mental function that affects cognition. it must be severe enough that it causes a negative change to the person socially or in terms of occupation and while these are occurring the person must be in an otherwise clear state of mind, not delirious for example During dementia there is damage to the nerve cells of the brain and it is usually a progressive condition, meaning that overtime it gets worse, this is because unlike other cells in our bodies when a nerve cell dies it cannot be replaced, this will eventually lead to the brain shrinking in size known as brain atrophy. The symptoms that a person will get depends on the cause of the dementia and the area of the brain that is affected. For example, if cells in the temporal lobe are affected, the person may have trouble with language, if nerve cells in the hippocampus are affected, the person may start having problems with memory, and so on. But the common symptoms of dementia are a loss of memory, a loss of physical co- ordination and impaired cognition. The main cause of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease which accounts for about 50 -70% of cases, followed by Vascular dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, there are other causes such as Frontotemporal dementia, dementia relating to medications, vitamin deficiencies, chronic brain infections, thyroid gland problems, in certain cases even depression can present as dementia. It is possible for a patient to have what is known as mixed dementia, this is a dementia that has two or more causes. Mild cognitive impairment is a state that is in between normal cognition and dementia, normally it presents as having a mild impairment with memory that is more advance that is expected for their age, but not enough to be dementia What is Dementia? www.youtube.com/watch?v=0o6OFjESelQ&feature=youtu.be FOLLOW ME Twitter and Instagram: Medic_Ene Twitter: https://twitter.com/Medic_Ene Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/medic_ene/ MedicEne provides a fun and different view of medical problems among other things, hope you enjoy it! The information provided on this video is for informational purposes only and is not professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care, nor is it intended to be a substitute therefor. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified health provider properly licensed to practice medicine or general health care in your jurisdiction concerning any questions you may have regarding any information obtained from this video and any medical condition you believe may be relevant to you or to someone else. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have seen in this video. Always consult with your physician or other qualified health care provider before embarking on a new treatment, diet or fitness program. Information obtained in this video is not exhaustive and does not cover all diseases, ailments, physical conditions or their treatment.
Views: 13036 MedicEne
Psychiatry Lecture: Schizophrenia
 
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A presentation on ‘Schizophrenia’ that systematically gives an overview of the following: • Introduction • Clinical features • Schizophrenia in ICD-10 and DSM-5 • ARMS (At-Risk Mental State) • Epidemiology • Aetiology • Assessment / Management • Prognosis The presentation finishes with a set of 5 self-assessment MCQs. This video has been prepared by: Dr. S. Rajagopal MBBS, DPM (Ireland), MRCPsych (UK), CCST (UK) Consultant Psychiatrist Chennai, Tamil Nadu, INDIA Disclaimer This video is provided for educational / informational purposes only. This is not a substitute for professional medical consultation. Psychiatry, like other medical specialities, is a constantly evolving field. I cannot give any guarantee that the information in this video is accurate or up to date. I assume no responsibility for any omissions or errors. More details about Dr. Rajagopal can be found at http://psychiatristinchennai.blogspot.in/
Views: 33101 Psychiatry Lectures
Delirium Revised
 
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Red Solo Cup Parody.
Views: 658 mccor246
Delirium Launch - Ms Joan Jackman
 
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The Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care launched the Delirium Clinical Care Standard in July 2016. The Delirium Clinical Care Standard provides guidance to consumers, clinicians and health services on delivering appropriate care to people at risk of, or with, delirium. Download the standard at safetyandquality.gov.au/ccs
Views: 384 ACSQHC
Seniors' Care at NYGH: Dementia
 
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Dementia is a brain disorder associated with memory loss that impacts activities of day-to-day life. About 15% of Canadians over the age 65 are living with dementia. Dr. Goran Eryavec, Physician at NYGH, explains that an early diagnosis with early interventions and treatments can slow the progression of the disease, giving patients a higher quality of life for a longer period. Roula Mandas, Social Worker at NYGH, recommends if you have concerns about your memory, talk to you family physician about getting connected to program like NYGH’s Memory Clinic. Learn more: www.nygh.on.ca/seniorcare
Views: 660 NYGHNews
Nursing Week 2011: Shirley Bell - Using the Delirium, Dementia, and Depression BPG in Practice
 
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RN Shirley Bell, from St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto discusses the Delirium, Depression and Dementia BPG she uses as part of her practice.
NCLEX Practice Questions: Use of a Nosey Cup in a Stroke Patient (Neurology/Basic Care and Comfort)
 
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Start practicing with 3,500 NCLEX Questions at: http://www.NursingPracticeQuestions.com View all NCLEX Practice Questions at: https://www.nrsng.com/nclex-questions/ Question: A nurse is caring for an 80-year-old client who is in rehabilitation after having a stroke. The nurse is teaching the client about how to use a nosey cup. Which of the following best describes this device? Answer: B. A cup that has a portion cut out of the front Rationale: A nosey cup is a type of device that may be used by some patients who have difficulty with drinking liquids. The nosey cup has a portion cut out of the front so that the patient can lift the cup to the face to drink and does not need to tilt the head back. It can be used for those with difficulties swallowing liquids.