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1st Long Care Plan of Nursing School, new stethoscope
 
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HI GUYS! in this vlog i got ready and packed my stuff to go back to apartment. I have clinicals thursday/fridays. But friday is my last clinical day can you believe it!!!!!!!!!!! This semester has flown by! I bought a new stethoscope, its the littman lightweight II. S.E & it works amazing for the price! its like 60 bucks on amazon! I highly highly HIGHLY reccommend it for incoming new nursing students :) Hope you guys have a fantastic day! I LOVE YOU GUYS. AND THANKS FOR THE LOVE AND SUPPORT! ******** IG: michelleounkham Email for business inquiries: michizzleizzle@gmail.com
Views: 5749 Michizzle TV
Jaundice - causes, treatment & pathology
 
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What is jaundice? Well, jaundice is a condition where the skin and eyes take on a yellowish color due to increased levels of bilirubin in the bloodstream. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Study better with Osmosis Prime. Retain more of what you’re learning, gain a deeper understanding of key concepts, and feel more prepared for your courses and exams. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways and more when you follow us on social: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Osmosis's Vision: Empowering the world’s caregivers with the best learning experience possible.
Views: 485344 Osmosis
Prenatal screening, fetal testing, and other tests during pregnancy
 
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This is a video on prenatal screening, fetal testing, and other tests and methods of evaluating mom and baby during pregnancy. I created this presentation with Google Slides. Images were created or taken from Wikimedia Commons I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor. ADDITIONAL TAGS: Prenatal screening, fetal testing, and other tests during pregnancy Used in 1st trimester to confirm intrauterine pregnancy, gestational age, singleton vs multiple births GA by measuring crown-rump-length (CRL), most accurate between 7 and 10 w 3rd trimester to assess fetal well-being with BPP, position/orientation, an/oligo/polyhydramnios Fetal anemia screen (transcranial doppler) after 20 w High velocity means baby Bb is low Cardiotocography for fetal monitoring uses Doppler u/s: see NST, CST, BPP Benefit: no risk to fetus and no complications 2 15 bpm accelerations lasting 15 sec (15 for 15, or 10 for 10 32 wks) Baseline heart rate of 110 to 160 bpm Moderate variability (6-25 bpm) No late or variable decels A typical CTG output for a woman not in labour. A: Fetal heartbeat; B: Indicator showing movements felt by mother (caused by pressing a button); C: Fetal movement; D: Uterine contractions Assessment of how fetus will handle contractions of childbirth Induce contractions with oxytocin or nipple stimulation to achieve 3 contractions (strength of 200+ Montevideo units) in 10 minutes Assess for Bradycardia: fetal heart rate less than 110 bpm Decelerations: Contraction stress test is positive if at least half the contractions are followed by late decelerations Type Timing and shape Indicative of Intervention Early decel. Mirrors contractions Head compression None Variable Abrupt, V-shaped, random relation to contractions Cord compression None unless recurrent Late Begin when contractions peak Placental insufficiency Immediate delivery Combines NST with ultrasound measurements. Score based on 5 criteria (2 pts each) for total of 1-10: (APGAR for fetus) Defined as: diagnosis of diabetes 20 weeks gestation. Risk factors: BMI 30; history of prediabetes; family hx of DM; age 25; history of stillbirth, polyhydramnios, macrosomia, hypertension, steroid use, PCOS Diagnose as follows: One hour glucose tolerance test: Give 50 g glucose, measure blood sugar at 1 hr If above 140, proceed to three hour test Three hour glucose tolerance test: Give 100 g glucose, measure blood sure at 0, 1, 2, and 3 hrs If above 90, 190, 155, or 140, respectively, then diagnosis is gestational diabetes mellitus. Other findings: High glucose or prediabetes before pregnancy High HbA1c T1DM has anti-insulin or anti-islet cell antibodies Treat GDM first with diet and exercise; postprandial insulin if refractory; and metformin and glyburide if insulin is contraindicated. Premise: Alloimmunization is a concern if mom is Rh Ag negative and baby is Rh Ag positive. If there is blood mixing, she can develop anti-Rh antibodies. Her immune system can then attack Rh Ag positive fetus, causing fetal anemia. To screen… For Rh Ag negative mom, check for Rh antibodies If mom is Rh antibody negative If baby can be Rh Ag + (dad is + or unknown), use RhoGAM at 28 weeks and at delivery If mom is Rh antibody positive (specifically for type D) Perform transcranial doppler to assess for fetal anemia High blood velocities can be indicative of fetal anemia (less viscous blood flows faster) Consider intrauterine blood transfusion or early delivery (if after 36 weeks) RhoGAM = Rho (D) Immune Globulin Hgb = RBC mass / plasma volume Screen moms at 28 weeks with CBC or H&H. If Hgb 10 or Hct 30, perform iron studies Iron def anemia: low ferritin, low MCV, high RDW Most common cause of anemia in pregnancy Add iron supplement (30 mg/day, which is a 100% increase) Sampling of small amount of amniotic fluid through transabdominal needle aspiration; after 16 weeks Used to diagnose NTDs and genetic disorders, including down’s syndrome Risk: fetal loss (1/200 to 1/300); chorioamnionitis; fetal injury; alloimmunization; ROM Replaced with quad screen (measure maternal proteins) and cell-free DNA (detect fetal DNA in mom’s circulation) dilutional anemia Ultrasound Nonstress test Contraction stress test Biophysical profile Diabetes screen Rhesus screen Anemia screen Amniocentesis Chorionic villus sampling Percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling Procedure: blood is collected from umbilical vein to detect fetal infections, fetal anemia, Rh sensitization, or chromosomal defects. Performed after 18-20 weeks and before 34 weeks (for late detection) For fetal anemia, perform transcranial Doppler to confirm Unique benefit: creates vascular access; can transfuse baby → fix fetal anemia
Views: 18109 MedLecturesMadeEasy
Infant Loss Support - To have and to hold - UT Health San Antonio's School of Nursing
 
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When a child dies at birth, nothing is routine. Tests and medical procedures suddenly stop. Instead of the wailing of a newborn, there is silence. Years ago, this was also where the patient’s care ended. Today, nurses are realizing this is a critical moment when the standard of care should strengthen. This is the beginning of the family’s journey to healing, and as health care providers, nurses are a vital component in that journey. The perinatal loss program, offered through UT Health San Antonio’s nursing school, teaches students how to communicate with families who have pregnancy loss. Learn more at https://magazines.uthscsa.edu/mission/to-have-and-to-hold/
Hypoxia & cellular injury - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment & pathology
 
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What is hypoxia? When cells are deprived of oxygen, a series of events take place that leads to cellular injury and—if deprived long enough—eventually apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Study better with Osmosis Prime. Retain more of what you’re learning, gain a deeper understanding of key concepts, and feel more prepared for your courses and exams. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways and more when you follow us on social: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Thank you to our Patreon supporters: Alex Wright Omar Berrios Osmosis's Vision: Empowering the world’s caregivers with the best learning experience possible.
Views: 82035 Osmosis
Nursing World Shared Practice - "Family Bereavement: Role of Nurses" with Ulrika Kreicbergs, Ph.D.
 
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Please visit: www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access-and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu Please note: OPENPediatrics does not support nor control any related videos in the sidebar, these are placed by Youtube. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.
Views: 90 OPENPediatrics
Hypoxic Ishemic Encephalopathy with Neonatal Cooling therapy _ NICU HMG
 
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Perinatal asphyxia, more appropriately known as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), is characterized by clinical and laboratory evidence of acute or subacute brain injury due to asphyxia. The primary causes of this condition are systemic hypoxemia and/or reduced cerebral blood flow (CBF) (see the image below). Birth asphyxia causes 840,000 or 23% of all neonatal deaths worldwide. Now, a new cooling therapy is set to help these babies. The treatment takes advantage of a therapeutic window that occurs after a newborn baby suffers oxygen shortage. By cooling the body (a technique called therapeutic hypothermia) to reduce brain temperature, doctors can alter the chemical processes that lead to brain damage. As soon as possible after birth, and with strict controls in place, the baby is cooled with a purposemade cap or with a special blanket or mattress. After about three days, the baby is gradually warmed again. This videography was made in the presentation of Maternal and Child Nursing in Dr. Sulaiman Al Habib Medical Group Arrayan Hospital with the Neonatal Intensive Care Nurses.
Views: 9036 Ma Vic
Providing Nursing Care: Provides client - centred care in situations related to:
 
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Providing Nursing Care: Provides client - centred care in situations related to: Competencies in the Context of Entry - Level Registered Nurse Practice in British Columbia _____________________________________________________________________________________________ 13 College of Registered Nurses of British Columbia  health promotion, prevention, and population health;  maternal/child health;  altered health status, including acute and chronic physical and mental health conditions and rehabilitative care; and  palliative care and end - of - life care . Competencies: Providin g Nursing Care 57. Provides nursing care across the lifespan that is informed by a variety of theories relevant to health and healing (e.g., nursing; family; communication and learning; crisis intervention; loss, grief, and bereavement; systems; culture; community development; and population health theories). 58. Prioritizes and provides timely nursing care and consult as necessary for any client with co - morbidities, and a complex and rapidly changing health status. 59. Provides nursing care to clients with chron ic and persistent health challenges (e.g., mental illness, problematic substance use, dementia, cardiovascular conditions, strokes, asthma, arthritis, complex pain, and diabetes). 60. Incorporates current evidence from research, clinical practice, client persp ective, client and staff safety, and other available resources to make decisions about client care. 61. Supports clients through developmental stages and role transitions across the lifespan (e.g., pregnancy, infant nutrition, well - baby care, child development stages, family planning and relations). 62. Recognizes, seeks immediate assistance, and helps others in a rapidly changing client condition affecting health or patient safety (e.g., myocardial infarction, surgical complications, acute neurological event, acut e respiratory event, cardiopulmonary arrest, perinatal crisis, pain crisis, diabetes crisis, mental health crisis, premature birth, shock, and trauma). 63. Applies principles of population health to implement strategies to promote health as well as prevent ill ness and injury and reduce harm (e.g., promoting hand washing, immunization, helmet safety, and safe sex). 64. Assists clients to understand how lifestyle factors impact health (e.g., physical activity and exercise, sleep, nutrition, stress management, person al and community hygiene practices, family planning, and high risk behaviours). 65. Develops and implements learning plans to meet identified client learning needs. 66. Assists clients to identify and access health and other resources in their communities (e.g., o ther health disciplines, community health services, rehabilitation services, support groups, home care, relaxation therapy, meditation, and information resources). 67. Applies knowledge when providing nursing care to prevent development of complications (e.g., optimal ventilation and respiration, circulation, fluid and electrolyte balance, Competencies in the Context of Entry - Level Registered Nurse Practice in British Columbia _____________________________________________________________________________________________ 14 College of Registered Nurses of British Columbia medication interactions, nutrition, urinary elimination, bowel elimination, body alignment, mobility, tissue integrity, comfort, and sensory stimulation). 68. Applies bio - hazard and safety principles, evidence - informed practices, infection prevention and control practices, and appropriate protective devices when providing nursing care to prevent injury to clients, self, other health care workers, and the public. 69. Implements strate gies related to the safe and appropriate administration and use of medication. 70. Recognizes and takes initiative to support environmentally - responsible practice (e.g., observing safe waste disposal methods, using energy as efficiently as possible, and recyc ling plastic containers and other recyclable materials). 71. Performs therapeutic interventions safely (e.g., positioning, skin and wound care, management of intravenous therapy and drainage tubes, and psychosocial interaction). 72. Implements evidence - informed p ractices of pain prevention and pain management with clients using pharmacological and non - pharmacological measures. 73. Prepares the client for diagnostic procedures and treatments; provides post - diagnostic care; performs procedures; interprets findings, and provides follow - up care as appropriate. 74. Provides nursing care to meet palliative care or end - of - life care needs (e.g., pain and symptom management, psychosocial and spiritual support, and support for significant others
Views: 578 paulvr173cm
Impact of the CFDT Perinatal Palliative Care and Bereavement Program: A Provider/Parent Panel
 
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Parents who experienced the loss of their baby shortly after birth discuss the impact of the Perinatal Palliative Care and Bereavement Program at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). In this panel discussion, families cared for by the program, housed in CHOP’s Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment, share their feelings about what it was like preparing to deliver their baby with a life-limiting fetal diagnosis. They talk about how a coordinated Perinatal Palliative Care and Bereavement Program helped them prepare for an anticipated perinatal loss, and how the medical, nursing and psychosocial services provided at Children’s Hospital supported them through an extremely difficult time. Specialists from the Hospital briefly discuss the different roles team members provide for the pregnant patient, her partner, and their family. The CFDT’s Perinatal Palliative Care and Bereavement Program focuses on supporting families expecting babies diagnosed with life-threatening illnesses from the point of diagnosis, throughout the pregnancy, at the time of delivery, and beyond the death of their baby. At CHOP, obstetricians, maternal-fetal medicine specialists, neonatologists, nurses, chaplains, social workers, child life specialists and clinical psychologists are available to support families when coping with a fetal and/or neonatal death. Our Perinatal Palliative Care and Bereavement Program offers pregnancy options counseling, prenatal care services, guidance through the medical choices available at birth, palliative care birth planning, direction and access to community resources to help with the grieving process, coordination of spiritual support, sibling preparation, family memory-making opportunities, and more. Learn more: http://www.chop.edu/pages/perinatal-palliative-care-and-bereavement
Caring for Families
 
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Views: 83 Medverdict
Necrotizing Enterocolitis for USMLE
 
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Necrotizing Enterocolitis is the most common cause of GIT problems in preterm. It is a mucosal or even trans-mucosal necrosis which can often times cause perforation. Incidence and fatality increases with prematurity. Pathogenesis is related to three underlying factors. First factor of necortizing enterocolitis is intestinal ischemia, enteral nutrition, and finally bacterial colonization. Enteral Nutrition of the preterm infant is still premature therefore there is decreased motility and function. Since it is not being absorbed there is increased amount of bacteria. Therefore aggressive enteral feeding of preterm infant can predispose to necrotizing enterocolitis. Therefore in preterm you don't want to overfeed them. Human milk tends to be better formula milk. Most likely becuase protective affects of IgA. Bacterial growth in newborn with Necrotizing Entercolitis is due to immature barrier and immature immune system. Also the pH is still high and therefore it is difficult to tackle some of the bacteria. Common organisms are the coagulase nigative staph, e.coli, klebsiella, clostridium perfringens, rotavirus. Antibiotics for more than 5 days also increases likelihood. Term infants don't get necrotizing entercolitis, but if they have congenital heart disease, perinatal asphyxia, respiratory condition, polycythemia can predispose to necrotizing enterocolitis. Indomethacin is associated with this because it causes contraction of splanchnic vasculature. CLINICAL FINDINGS Initially patient will be doing okay until the first or second week, however, it can be up to 30 days later. The greater the prematurity the later in gestational age will be seen. Presentation begins with decreasing feed tolerance, distention and vomiting and diarrhea. Diarrhea is generally bloody. Pateitns with necrotizing entercolitis can develop sepsis, DIC, and perforation. Management of Necrotizing entercolitis is to first do an abdominal x-ray to confirm the diagnosis. If pneumoperitoneum is suspected the patient needs to be left lateral decubitus position and you can see air in the abdomen. Pneumatosis intestinalis which is gas in the small intestines. There will also be dilated loops. Abdominal ultrasound will show the same picture, but there is also fluid collection and there will be bowel wall thickness. Hepatic ultrasound may show portal venous gas. Labs of necrotizing entercolitis can't confirm necrotizing entercolitis, but it can help rule out other causes and establish a baseline value. If there is severe neutropenia less than 1,500 than that is a poor prognostic sign. Coagulation is suspected DIC, and serum markers and electrolytes which can suggest necrosis and sepsis. Respiratory problems associated with Arterial Blood Gas. Sepsis workup is related to blood culture, stool culture, and CSF culture. Stool culture you may want to look for occult blood. Differential Diagnosis is obstruction, rotavirus, but this will be more clustered. Cow milk protein allergy. Spontaneous intestinal performation may mimic necrotizing entercolitis, however, there will be a bluish discoloration rather than reddish discoloration. Management of necrotizing entercolitis is supportive. This includes bowel rest by giving TPN, Nasogastric suctioning, If there is Cardiovascular or respiratory issue than that also needs to be addressed. IV Fluids must correct for loss of fluids. Anti-Biotics you need to go broad spectrum. Empirical treatment you have every hospital has its own protocol. Pediatric Surgeon needs to be invovled especially if there is any sign of perforation. They can't really handle surgery. Laparatory of necrotic bowel and resection, but this can lead to short bowel syndrome. Primary Peritoneal Drainage at bedside they can make a stab wound at McBurney's Point. Preferred if they are Extremely Low Birth Weight. Complications of necrotizing entercolitis can be divided into Acute and Chronic. Sepsis, DIC, CVS, Resp, Metabolic acidosis and hyoglycemia are the acute complications. Chronic complications may be strictures and worsening symptoms. If they undergo surgery there may be Short Bowel Syndrome and the infant can't absorb enough nutrients and they need to be on TPN. Generally, 50% have not sequelae, but mortality is between 20-40%. The more pre-term they are, then the higher the mortality. Prevention of necrotizing entercolitis is breastfeeding and if they are Very Low Birth Weight then minimize enteral feeding, but there needs to be judicious volume advancement. Probiotics also has shown some benefits in treating necrotizing entercolitis.
Views: 19869 the study spot
2nd Semester: My first IV ever...
 
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Yes I know I did a terrible jobs it’s my first time every doing it. So don’t come at me. 1). I need to follow aseptic technique 2). I need to remove the tourniquet, occlude, and THEN separate the needle from the cannula 3). You should NEVER let go of your IV like I so gracefully did lol Definitely will be practicing a lot moreeee Leave your feedback please! I’d appreciate it! IG: michelleounkham email for inquiries: michizzleizzle@gmail.com
Views: 6863 Michizzle TV
High-Risk Pregnancy: Jasmine’s Story
 
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Expecting twins, Jasmine’s life changes dramatically when a rare condition threatens her babies. After 12 weeks under the watchful eyes in Sharp Mary Birch Hospital for Women & Newborn’s Perinatal Special Care Unit, Dr. Lorraine Stanco and Dr. Philip Diamond decide it’s time to deliver Jasmine’s girls. To learn more about hi-risk pregnancy and childbirth services at Sharp HealthCare in San Diego, visit https://www.sharp.com/pregnancy.
Views: 638915 Sharp HealthCare
How do you know if a patient has a high risk of stroke?
 
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Grzegorz P. Rozmus, MD discusses some factors that put patients at a higher risk for strokes. Have more of your cardiac care questions answered at http://blog.chsbuffalo.org/heart-health-questions/
Views: 4920 Catholic Health
Perinatal Emotional Distress: Training for Health Care Providers
 
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Get trained and certified to screen for perinatal mood and anxiety disorders: Visit our website to watch this video there and take the quiz: http://bit.ly/PMAD-screening-training This video primer is intended to equip medical providers - who routinely care for childbearing women and their families - with the tools needed to implement education, screening and referral protocols for perinatal mental health concerns. This video is particularly appropriate for physicians, nurses, and medical social workers in obstetric, pediatric, and family practice settings. The Seleni Institute is a nonprofit organization that supports women and couples through reproductive and maternal mental health issues, such as postpartum depression, infertility, and miscarriage. Find out more about Seleni: http://seleni.org/about The Seleni Institute provides treatment for women and their partners experiencing mental health concerns during pregnancy; the postpartum period; infertility; miscarriage, stillbirth and child loss; and parenting. Services also extend to pregnant teens and teenage mothers. In addition to psychotherapy and psychiatry, Seleni offers free support groups, sleep clinics, and breastfeeding help - all under one roof on the Upper East Side of Manhattan in New York City. http://seleni.org/care The Seleni website contains many articles providing practical advice and support from experts. http://seleni.org/advice-support The Seleni Institute trains mental health providers to treat perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs) and perinatal grief and loss, and provides free trainings to health care providers to screen pregnant and postpartum women for PMADs. http://seleni.org/trainings Additionally, the Seleni Institute funds perinatal mental health research. http://seleni.org/research
Views: 1628 Seleni Institute
Neonatal Care for babies - Dr. Prathap Chandra
 
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In this video, the doctor discusses breast feeding after the first few days after birth and why mothers milk is very important. How many times infants pass urine and stools is also discussed, The idea temperature of a baby's room, when to bathe a baby, care for the umbilical cord, how to clothe your baby, etc. is discussed. Why exposing the baby to sunlight is not a good idea is further discussed in this video.. nnWeight gain in babies is explained in detail..
Dr. Thomas Myles, SLUCare OB/GYN
 
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Dr. Thomas Myles specializes in perinatal care, including high-risk pregnancy, medical and surgical complications in pregnancy, recurrent pregnancy loss, and prenatal diagnosis. He treats patients with pre-existing medical complications and those requiring intensive care during pregnancy. He offers preconception counseling and labor, delivery, and postpartum care. Dr. Myles is interested in research topics related to perinatal care, including: fetal monitoring; obesity in pregnancy; ultrasound in high-risk pregnancies; and gestational diabetes management. More information online at www.slucare.edu/obgyn To schedule an appointment with a SLUCare physician, please call (314) 977-4440. Video shot, edited and produced by Emily Clemenson. SLUCare Physician Group is a patient-centered network of more than 500 health care providers on staff at Saint Louis University School of Medicine. As part of an academic medical practice, SLUCare physicians are experts in their respective fields, providing specialty care for even the most complex medical conditions. SLUCare physicians practice in 47 different hospitals and clinics throughout the St. Louis region, making high-quality, advanced care convenient for you and your family.
Views: 149 SLUCare
PCMP Perinatal Case Manager Program Video - Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
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Brigham and Womens case managers, based in Boston community health centers, work with pregnant black and Latina women to assess their needs and connect them to social services and coordinating care.
Postpartum hemorrhage | Reproductive system physiology | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Visit us (http://www.khanacademy.org/science/healthcare-and-medicine) for health and medicine content or (http://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat) for MCAT related content. These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any Khan Academy video. Created by Nauroz Syed. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-reproductive-system-physiology/rn-pregnancy/v/uterine-inversion?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-reproductive-system-physiology/rn-pregnancy/v/sheehan-syndrome?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 89767 khanacademymedicine
My Baby Is Diagnosed With HIE (Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy) Did Medical Malpractice Cause This?
 
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My baby is diagnosed with HIE, did medical malpractice cause this? When parents are told about this medical condition they are usually confused at first, at least in my experience talking with parents, a lot of the confusion comes from the fact that many people have not heard of this term. HIE is short for Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy. The medical condition essentially deals with a reduced level of blood and oxygen in the baby which can lead to a brain injury. When a child is diagnosed with HIE parents will generally have a lot of questions, with one of the main questions dealing with whether medical malpractice is the case of the child’s HIE diagnosis. MY BABY IS DIAGNOSED WITH HIE After a parent tells me that my baby is diagnosed with HIE, the next question is usually did medical malpractice cause my baby to be this way? To be able to answer that question, a full review of facts and medical records must ensue. One of the common fact patterns we see and read about is where the mother has a pretty normal pregnancy. Mom takes the time to follow up with all of her doctors and keep current with any and all medical orders. The day mom checks into the hospital, the doctors do a sonogram and everything will in some instances look fine. However, as time goes on through the delivery, problems will arise which demand that the doctors and nurses take emergency action for the wellbeing of the baby and mom. THE IMPORTANCE OF THE FETAL HEART MONITOR The fetal heart monitor is a device that helps the doctors to, among other things, determine how well a baby is tolerating a vaginal delivery. One key area of analysis with the fetal heart monitor is the baby’s heart rate. On average a normal heart rate for a baby in this situation is between 120-160 beats per minute. As a baby’s heart rate climbs above 160 bpm and below 120 bpm for a considerable amount of time, problems can occur. Not only is the heart rate important, things such as early vs late decelerations are important. The variability in the strip is also very important. DID MEDICAL MALPRACTICE CAUSE MY BABY’S HIE DIAGNOSIS? When a parent says my baby is diagnosed with HIE, did medical malpractice cause this, one of the areas of serious review will be the fetal heart strips. If flags are present in the strips, and flags are ignored, the baby can suffer a life-altering brain injury. HIE can be the result because essentially the baby has gotten an insufficient amount of blood and oxygen during the delivery. Doctors and nurses have to move towards an emergency C-section when the child is no longer tolerating a vaginal delivery. Again, this is because the baby can suffer a serious brain injury if left to use up all of the baby’s fetal reserves. DID YOUR BABY DEAL WITH HYPOXIC ISCHEMIC ENCEPHALOPOTHY AND NOW HAS A CERBRAL PALSY DIAGNOSIS? Cerebral Palsy is a physical impairment. It is marked by spastic movements of the arms and/or legs. It is a result of a brain injury or brain malformation. The brain can be injured by: bleeding in the brain; lack of blood flow to the brain; lack of oxygen to the brain; and traumatic injury at birth; among some of the causes. WHEN YOU HAVE MORE QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR BABY’S BRAIN INJURY CALL ME… To speak with me further about your baby’s brain injury at birth this is what I invite you to do. Pick up the phone and give me a call. I can be reached at 301-850-4832. I answer birth injury questions like yours all of the time and I would be happy to listen to your story. Marcus B. Boston, Esq. Boston Law Group, LLC 2 Wisconsin Circle, Suite 700 Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815 bostonlawllc.com
Views: 430 BostonLawGroupLLC
What is cerebral palsy and what causes it? | Mental health | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
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Visit us (http://www.khanacademy.org/science/healthcare-and-medicine) for health and medicine content or (http://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat) for MCAT related content. These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any Khan Academy video. Created by Emma Giles. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-mental-health/neurodevelopmental-disorders-rn/v/types-of-cerebral-palsy-part-1-spastic?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-mental-health/neurodevelopmental-disorders-rn/v/neurodevelopmental-disorders-sufficient-and-necessary-causes?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 31017 khanacademymedicine
"Cardiac History and Exam" by Christina Ronai for OPENPediatrics
 
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Please visit: www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics™ is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access-and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: openpediatrics@childrens.harvard.edu Please note: OPENPediatrics does not support nor control any related videos in the sidebar, these are placed by Youtube. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause. Hi, my name is Christina Ronai. I'm one of the Cardiology Fellows at Boston Children's Hospital and I'll be talking to you today about the cardiac history and physical exam when evaluating children for possible cardiac disease. Our objectives today are to understand the clinical history relevant to heart disease in children, recognize the features of the clinical exam in heart disease, understand the basics of auscultation and characterization of cardiac murmurs, and understand the features of pathologic versus benign murmurs. Clinical History. From a history standpoint, there are three important categories: gestational and perinatal history, especially if evaluating an infant, postnatal and present history, and then family history. We're going to go through each of these. The gestational and perinatal history is really important when evaluating an infant. Specifically, you're going to want to ask about the maternal history. Were they healthy while they were pregnant? Did they receive prenatal care? And did they have regular ultrasounds during pregnancy? And if so, did those show anything of concern? When you're asking about maternal infections, you're referring mostly to the TORCH infections, but any infection is also important to note. Finally, you're going to ask if mom took any medications. Specifically, phenytoin, lithium, retinoic acid, and warfarin have all been associated with cardiac malformations. The postnatal and present history is our next category. Most importantly for infants and young children is are they growing along their growth curve? And if they're not growing along their growth curve, have they at least continued to consistently gain weight or have they been losing weight? Are they meeting their developmental milestones? Have there been any feeding problems? Is there any cyanosis? Decreased exercise tolerance. Specifically for young children, you're going to want to ask, as they run around on the playground, are they able to keep up with their peers or are they falling back? Have they ever fainted or felt as if they were about to faint? Have they ever experienced chest pain or palpitations? When you're asking about palpitations, I usually pose the question to children have they had any extra beats or skipped beats? The most important thing to remember when evaluating an infant is that feeding is really an exercise test for them. And if they are able to feed and grow, there's usually not a major cardiac issue. Family history. You're going to want to ask if anyone has ever been born with a heart problem. And that'll be your screening for family history of congenital heart disease. Has anyone passed away suddenly or from an unexplained cause? Often I will also ask about unexplained car accidents or drownings, because those can be indicative of electrical problems with the heart. Does anyone have hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy? And does anyone in the family require a pacemaker or an implanted defibrillator?
Views: 9760 OPENPediatrics
Holding Space:  Palliative Care in the NICU at Johns Hopkins Children's Center
 
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The expectation and arrival of a new baby is supposed to be a joyful time in a family’s life, but many parents are left reeling when they receive the heartbreaking news that their baby likely won’t live long. Four families share their experiences of loss in Johns Hopkins Children's Center's NICU, and staff speak about the services available through Johns Hopkins’ Perinatal Palliative Care Program to support parents facing the unimaginable: the death of their baby. As medical technology continues to advance, we are more able to discover serious anomalies prenatally, and to sometimes keep babies alive who are born extremely premature and/or with devastating medical conditions. Parents in these situations often have to make difficult and heartrending decisions about their child’s care. The Johns Hopkins’ Pediatric Palliative Care Team provides support to these families in a variety of ways and works hard to make sure that even the shortest lives are infused with sacredness and dignity. Learn more about Palliative Care at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center at http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/johns-hopkins-childrens-center/what-we-treat/specialties/palliative-care/ Chapters: 1. Palliative Care in the NICU 2:30 2. Making Decisions 4:54 3. Parenting 9:50 4. Siblings 11:51 5. Grieving 14:51 6. More Information 21:09
Views: 28826 Johns Hopkins Medicine
The Perinatal Care Experiences of Women with Physical Disabilities: Overview of Preliminary Findings
 
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Speaker: Tarasoff, L.A. This research presenttion is from the 2 minute segment of the Women's Xchange Spring Event 2015, Women's Health Research: Reaching the Hard to Reach Abstract: Background:Although equivalent data is not available in Canada, research from the U.S. indicates that women with physical disabilities give birth at similar rates to non-disabled women (Iezzoni et al., 2013) and that disabled and non-disabled women have similar fertility desires (Shandra, Hogan, & Short, 2014). Despite the growing number of mothers with physical disabilities, many report encountering barriers to perinatal care, including negative attitudes, inaccessible care settings, and a lack of knowledge about the interaction of pregnancy and disability among service providers (Signore et al., 2011; Tarasoff, 2015). Objective:To better understand the unique perinatal care experiences women with physical disabilitiesin the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Methods: Women with physical or mobility-limiting disabilities who have become mothers in the last five years and live in the GTAwere recruited via online networks and relevant community organizations and health care settings. Eligible participants completed a socio-demographic survey and participated in a 60-120 minute, in-person, in-depth interview. A constructivist grounded theory approach (Charmaz, 2006) is being used to analyze the data and generate common themes. Results:To-date, 9 interviews have been completed. Some common themes that have been identified thus far include inaccessible care settings; lack of information and knowledge on the part of both mothers-to-be and service providers concerning the interaction of pregnancy, labour, disability and medication, and as such participants report having to educate providers and advocate for particular types of care; the push for increased intervention in labour and birth (i.e., the assumption that disability equals high risk); the importance of social, partner, and financial support; parenting challenges and use of adaptive devices; chronic pain; breastfeeding challenges; and worries about loss of custody.
Views: 96 Women's Xchange
How we supported babies and families in 2013 (short version)
 
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In this video, we look back at the last year and how - thanks to your support - we were able to help thousands of premature and scick babies and their families in 2013. We focus on three key areas of our work and how we are making a really positive impact on the care and treatment of special care babies. Bliss Nurses have supported thousands of anxious parents and families and enabled them to play a key role in the care of their baby. Our work with doctors and nurses in neonatal units across the country has improved the care that is delivered to babies and their families. And thanks to the growth of our volunteering programme, thousands of parents are receiving direct support, both on unit and after their baby has gone home. Thanks to your support we've achieved a lot in 2013, but there is still so much more than needs to be done. To find out how you can get involved with Bliss and support the 80,000 babies born too soon, too small and too sick in the UK each year go to www.bliss.org.uk
Views: 759 Bliss Baby Charity
It Depends What State You’re In: Policies and Politics of the US Health Care System | Part 1
 
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Health care and political systems are deeply intertwined, with implications for the quality and equality of access to health care. This symposium explores the political dynamics of health care laws and the way they affect people not only as patients but also as citizens. Health professionals, policy and public health experts, economists, sociologists, and political scientists draw on comparative politics and policies of the states—alone and as part of a federalist system—and on international perspectives to explore the relationships between citizens and their health care. WELCOME AND OPENING REMARKS Lizabeth Cohen, dean, Radcliffe Institute, and Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies, Department of History, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences Daniel Carpenter (7:42), faculty director of the social sciences program, Radcliffe Institute, and Allie S. Freed Professor of Government, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences FUNCTIONS AND DYSFUNCTIONS OF THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT (14:11) Andrea Louise Campbell (20:06), Arthur and Ruth Sloan Professor of Political Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Kate Walsh, president and CEO (35:40), Boston Medical Center Georges C. Benjamin (50:45), executive director, American Public Health Association Moderated by Benjamin Sommers, associate professor of health policy and economics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health PANEL DISCUSSION (1:06:12) AUDIENCE Q&A (1:21:06)
Views: 3608 Harvard University
What you should know about Cerebral Palsy
 
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Cerebral palsy is a movement disorder caused by abnormal developments or brain damage before, during, or after a baby’s birth. Cerebral palsy affects movement, posture and muscle tone, reflex and balance. It causes abnormal reflexes, floppiness or rigidity of the limbs and trunk, involuntary movements, unsteady walking, or some combination of these. People with Cerebral Palsy (CP) could have issues with speaking and swallowing. There are more than 100,000 cases of Cerebral Palsy in Nigeria with most affected individuals in need of care due to CP’s effect on functional abilities. Though symptoms and severity differs for individuals, most affected with the condition go on to live fulfilling lives. CP is mostly congenital but it could also be acquired during infancy. SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS CP affects coordination and movement, though the signs and symptoms may vary but the most common signs of cerebral palsy include Problems with movement on one side of body Stiff muscles Exaggerated or jerky reflexes Involuntary movements or tremors Lack of coordination and balance Drooling Problems swallowing or sucking Difficulty with speech (dysarthria) Seizures Contractures (shortening of muscles) Delayed motor skill development Incontinence Gastrointestinal problems CAUSES The common causes of CP include: Mutations in genes that lead to abnormal brain development Maternal infections that affect the developing fetus Bacterial and viral infections that affect the brain Bleeding in the brain (hemorrhaging) A lack of oxygen to the brain before, during or after birth (asphyxia) Prenatal exposure to drugs and alcohol, mercury poisoning from fish and toxoplasmosis from raw/undercooked meat Head injuries sustained during birth or in the first few years of infancy PREVENTION Most cases of cerebral palsy can’t be prevented, but steps can be taken to reduce the risks. The best shot to some measure of prevention is for women to avoid pregnancy complication. Ensure you are vaccinated. Vaccination against diseases such as rubella may prevent an infection that could cause fetal brain damage. Stay healthy. The healthier you are heading into a pregnancy, the less likely you’ll be to develop an infection that may result in cerebral palsy. Early and continuous prenatal care. Regular visits to your doctor during your pregnancy are a good way to reduce health risks to you and your unborn baby. Seeing your doctor regularly can help prevent premature birth, low birth weight and infections. Prevent head injuries by providing your child with a car seat, bicycle helmet, safety rails on beds and appropriate supervision. CURE Cerebral palsy is incurable, as the damage to the brain cannot be fixed. However, treatment and therapy can help manage its effect on the body. Surgery, medications and assistive technology can also help maximize independence, increase inclusion and thus lead to an enhanced quality of life.
Views: 441 Guardian Nigeria
Top 5 Misconceptions Impacting Collaboration: Case Management & Social Work POV
 
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These videos are part of the free, open access course “Interprofessional Education for 21st Century Care” which can be found here: https://lagunita.stanford.edu/courses/course-v1:Medicine+IPE21CC+ongoing/about This curriculum aims to provide a basic understanding of the roles and backgrounds of some core members of the interprofessional healthcare team. It also provides insight into these professionals' views of the types of common misconceptions that can derail collaboration, as well as their suggestions for how to improve. This curriculum has been developed primarily from focus groups and interviews with non-physician healthcare professionals at one academic medical center, with support from other sources. Most focus group participants worked in inpatient acute care: as such, the curriculum is focused primarily on inpatient acute care. Course team: Lead Course Developer: Mariposa Garth-Pelly, Medical Student, RN Course Producer: RJ Sánchez Online Instructor: David Svec, MD, MBA Online Instructor: Alistair Aaronson, MD Classroom Instructor: Sara Stafford, RN Research assistant, Course evaluation manager: Emmy Shearer, Medical Student, MPP, MSc Original Artwork and Animation: Jotham Porzio Media Production Staff: Adam Lopiccolo, Greg Maximov, and Adam Storek Web Design: Prakarn Nisarat With gratitude to all the healthcare professionals who participated in focus groups, being shadowed, providing feedback on the curriculum, and who appeared on-camera.
SGM Perinatal Hospice Birth and Bereavement Services 2014
 
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perinatal hospice and support for baby loss
Screening Program Increases Identification and Treatment of Perinatal Depression
 
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Kaiser Permanente in Northern California is helping to increase awareness and diagnosis of depression in pregnant patients with a program that is seeing positive results. http://k-p.li/1UWivns
Officers Split Over Carrying Opioid Antidote
 
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The divide over the overdose antidote naloxone between sheriffs in two Ohio counties shows how elusive solutions are on the front lines of the U.S. opioid crisis. (Dec. 18) Subscribe for more Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress Get updates and more Breaking News here: http://smarturl.it/APBreakingNews The Associated Press is the essential global news network, delivering fast, unbiased news from every corner of the world to all media platforms and formats. AP’s commitment to independent, comprehensive journalism has deep roots. Founded in 1846, AP has covered all the major news events of the past 165 years, providing high-quality, informed reporting of everything from wars and elections to championship games and royal weddings. AP is the largest and most trusted source of independent news and information. Today, AP employs the latest technology to collect and distribute content - we have daily uploads covering the latest and breaking news in the world of politics, sport and entertainment. Join us in a conversation about world events, the newsgathering process or whatever aspect of the news universe you find interesting or important. Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/AssociatedPress http://www.ap.org/ https://plus.google.com/+AP/ https://www.facebook.com/APNews https://twitter.com/AP
Views: 1231 Associated Press
Superior Health Solutions..Life Changing Results
 
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www.shslasvegas.com Superior Health Solutions is an integrated, state of the art, functional medicine clinic designed to be a one-stop place of care for the ideal patient experience. By combining multiple types of medical personnel, we evaluate each patient individually and personally. Onsite diagnostic testing and blood work are available so that patients can receive the most convenient and accurate evaluation possible. Once you can get a clear understanding of what the problem is, our medical team can put together the most comprehensive care plan possible in order to achieve the fastest and most permanent results. Life Changing Results.
Views: 145 SHSLasVegas
THE IMPORTANCE OF A BIRTH PLAN
 
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Perinatal social worker Kenna Hamm, LMSW, shares how a palliative care birth plan can help ensure that your wishes for your baby are honored throughout your pregnancy and delivery.
Views: 53 Carrying To Term
Implications of Newborn Screening for Nurses & ELSI in the Translation of Genomics into Healthcare
 
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March 20, 2013 - Journal of Nursing Scholarship Genomic Nursing Webinar Series More: http://www.genome.gov/27552312
Empty Arms Program: For Parents Grieving Infant and Pregnancy Loss
 
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Cooley Dickinson Hospital is proud to announce the recognition of the Empty Arms Program by the New England Association Directors of Healthcare Volunteer Services President's Award for Outstanding Program Community Outreach and Collaboration
Stress in pregnancy causes long term health problems for the unborn child
 
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(4 Nov 2009) SHOTLIST London, UK, October 30, 2009 1. Mid tilt up of pregnant woman in antenatal class 2. Mid shot zoom out of television showing educational breastfeeding programme to class 3. Various of pregnant women in class 4. Wide of heavily pregnant woman walking around antenatal reception in hospital 5. Close up of antenatal clinic sign 6. Wide of ward sister (senior nurse/midwife) entering antenatal reception 7. Mid shot through glass to reception 8. Mid shot of ward sister (senior nurse/midwife) on telephone antenatal reception 9. SOUNDBITE: (English), Joan Glasgow, antenatal manager, ward sister, Imperial College Healthcare, Queen Charlotte's Hospital "Some women do become quite stressed, but also it can also be caused by their environment, the fact also that they are single mothers, the fact that they are career women and they have to balance a career with being pregnant. They, the career women quite often have a very demanding job and it's very difficult to compromise both." 10. Mid shot of couple waiting in antenatal clinic reception 11. SOUNDBITE: (English), Joan Glasgow, antenatal manager, ward sister, Imperial College Healthcare, Queen Charlotte's Hospital "We do tend to tell women when they attend their first booking appointment and we also inform the women when they actually complain that they don't feel right and they think there might be a problem and obviously, at the point, we need to discuss various options with the women and in some cases it is possible that that woman needs to have a one to one midwife, who sees her constantly throughout the pregnancy and she has that one midwife to relate to." 12. Exterior mid shot of pregnant women walking into hospital 13. Wide of pregnant woman entering hospital 14. Medium close of woman massaging her stomach 15.SOUNDBITE: (English), Rosnah Hassell, pregnant, due to give birth November 3rd 2009 "your hormones are trying to get you to nest and create this lovely home environment, so I have seen people very stressed and anxious by trying to move and decorate and get ready, all whilst working full time. I mean, that's the other thing, I mean financially a lot of women work right up to the last moment these days in order to get the longer maternity leave afterwards, so they're working very long hours at the same time. I think it's really hard on women and I've been very lucky in my situation, in not having to deal with that." 16. Wide of Professor Vivette Glover entering Imperial College laboratory 17. Mid shot of Professor talking to student in dissection laboratory 18. Close up of Professor Glover 19. SOUNDBITE: (English), Professor Vivette Glover, Professor of Perinatal Psychobiology, Imperial College London "The foetus is normally protected from the mother's stress hormones, particularly cortisol, by the placenta. The placenta acts as a barrier. And in the placenta there is an enzyme called (11B-2HSD)2, which breaks down cortisol so that the foetus is protected. But under conditions of stress, in animals, it's been shown the level of this enzyme is reduced, so this allows more cortisol to pass from the mother to the foetus. And we don't yet know if that happens in humans, but we're actively studying it that's one of the things we're doing research on right now." 20. Various of student dissecting placenta 21. Close zoom out from placenta to petri dishes 22. SOUNDBITE: (English), Professor Vivette Glover, Professor of Perinatal Psychobiology, Imperial College London 23. Various of placenta dissection 24. SOUNDBITE: (English), Professor Vivette Glover, Professor of Perinatal Psychobiology, Imperial College London 25. Mid of pregnant woman in breast feeding class 26. Mid pan of women watching breastfeeding programme LEAD IN: You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/5b9243ed6744582a3bf4ee2ff018493f Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 5033 AP Archive
Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy; Pocket Pearls with Jordan Klebanoff
 
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Pockets Pearls is an online video reference library created by residents for residents. The mission is to have an easily accessible, readily available, resource to turn to when encountering unfamiliar clinical situations. The videos are intended to be short and provide information on how to initially manage different clinical scenarios we commonly encounter as OB/GYNs. The hope is that residents may access these videos on their way to evaluate a patient to formulate an initial differential diagnosis or management strategy.
Views: 226 OB GYN To Go
Post Partum Hemorrhage - Demo
 
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One woman dies every four minutes due to hemorrhage worldwide. Postpartum hemorrhage has become a focus of perinatal safety initiatives in the US to reduce maternal mortality. Early identification, routine third stage management, and prompt treatment of clinical triggers improves success and limits risks to patients. A collaborative team approach and BESST practice guidelines are outlined.
Views: 9974 PerinatalUniversity
Can You Take Metformin If Your Pregnant?
 
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Please do not quote me on did you stay your metformin in pregnancy, if so how long? Maybe talk to doctor about taking aspirin, are already i will second what bw has told can be taken safely thoughout 18 feb 2017 research does support the use of for reducing risk planning becoming pregnant while metformin, make let know and trying conceive gestational diabetes need medication such as affect them. Apr 2012 this study began in 2010 and will run until 2014, when its results be however, if you are already pregnant, should not try to lose become pregnant while using metformin, stop your medication without first talking i taking the before or after get pregnant? If use metformin throughout pregnancy it affect baby? . Metformin and pregnancy is it safe to take? Healthline healthline health metformin url? Q webcache. Metformin therapy during pregnancy diabetes care american taking metformin for pcos while pregnant? How will it affect your in pregnancy? ? ? ? ? Babycentre. Be made to discontinue breastfeeding or the drug, taking into account if you have questions about drugs are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, pharmacist while increased perinatal mortality and pre eclampsia was noted in one study of 50 women this will examine whether metformin should play a role obese type 2 diabetes pregnancy (mity) trial is when compared infants born appropriate size for gestational age (20) commonly prescribed treating insulin resistance aspect pcos. Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to take and when it i have pcos am newly pregnanti heard if through the first trimester, can help prevent miscarriages. Metformin and pregnancy is it safe to take? Healthline. Googleusercontent search. Is it safe to use metformin during pregnancy? Medical news today. Should i continue my metformin in early pregnancy? Verywell. This means that when a pregnant woman takes metformin, so does her baby i think it is different depending on the reason you are taking. Type 2 diabetes who were taking metformin before pregnancy, it is considered safe your health care professional will advise when you should take if not previous to being pregnant then stop advice and warnings for the use of during pregnancy. Metformin for gestational diabetes ukdrugs. On patients with gestational diabetes, mellitus one was a case controlled study, pregnant patient polycystic ovary syndrome asked me whether continuing metformin, which she taking to treat infertility before her pregnancy, is safe for fetus. I have pcos and been on metformin for 2 weeks, does anyone effects of early pregnancy loss in the polycystic ovary diabetes drug tested during health news side effects, uses, dosage, overdose, taking or glucophage your bellybelly. 16 jan 2015 if you experience upset stomach, try taking medication with food. She has heard that metformin is a drug for diabetes 12 may 2017 women with type 2 who already take be it considered one of the best first line treatments. Sep 2015 there's good news whether you ta
Views: 448 Question Box
2013 Pregnancy & Infant Loss Remembrance Ceremony
 
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Brandon Regional Hospital's Annual candlelit Pregnancy & Infant Loss Remembrance Ceremony held each October 15th at 6:30pm in Adam's Garden located at 119 Oakfield Drive in Brandon, Florida. Everyone welcome. For details, please contact the perinatal bereavement coordinator. The event is approximately 60-75 minutes and includes sentiments from nursing staff, parents, local clergy, & live musical performances. A memorial video is also shown which includes the names and/or photos of every baby whose life ended before it began. For information on how to have your baby included in next year's Remembrance Ceremony, please contact the perinatal bereavement program at Brandon Regional Hospital (or leave comments here). ****Families who have experienced a loss through miscarriage, stillbirth, or early newborn death are encouraged to complete a short survey (5-10mins) about your hospital experience. Your input is vitally important to us so that we can continue to improve the care provided to families experiencing the death of a baby. Link to SURVEY can be found here (FOR FAMILIES EXPERIENCING LOSS): http://www.healingheartsmedia.com/parent-survey.html SURVEY FOR HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS: http://www.healingheartsmedia.com/hospital-survey.html For more information on creating memories for bereaved families, visit Healing Hearts Media on the web. www.healingheartsmedia.com www.mybrh.com
Views: 1082 Remembrance Ceremony
Hospice Care & Grief Counseling : Dealing With a Co-Worker's Death
 
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When coping with a co-worker's death, managers should plan to have an open forum where employees feel free to discuss their emotions, offer assistance to the family and are given room to grieve differently. Hear suggestions for coping with a co-worker's death in this free video from a health care specialist. Expert: Sandi Sunter Contact: www.TheHospice.org Bio: Sandi Sunter is the director of community development for the Hospice of the Florida Suncoast. Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz
Views: 1084 eHow
Paleolithic Diets and Blood Pressure Control — Lynda Frassetto, M.D. (AHS14)
 
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Paleolithic Diets and Blood Pressure Control: How Do We Think It Works? Paleolithic (Paleo) diets differ from modern diets in many ways, among these being that Paleo diets are often much lower in sodium salts (mainly sodium chloride or table salt) and higher in potassium salts. Both higher sodium chloride intakes and lower potassium intakes are associated with higher blood pressure and poorer blood pressure control. We will review what metabolic changes, such as lipid levels and insulin resistance, have been seen in clinical trials altering dietary intakes of sodium and potassium, and some potential pathophysiologic mechanisms. Abstracts and information about the Ancestral Health Symposium can be found at www.ancestralhealth.org/ahs14-program.
Views: 4118 AncestryFoundation
Culturally Appropriate LCHF Diet Trial — Mikki Williden, Ph.D (AHS14)
 
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Primal Pacific: the Efficacy of a Culturally Appropriate LCHF Diet Trial for Reducing Health Risk Among Pacific Employees Pacific people in New Zealand are disproportionately represented in the health statistics with rapidly rising obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease rates that impact on both longevity and quality of life. Standard dietary recommendations to choose low fat, wholegrain carbohydrate foods and lean sources of animal protein are at odds with traditional Pacific food sources. I will present the results of a small feasibility trial that tested the efficacy of a low carbohydrate high fat (LCHF) whole food approach to diet (Primal Pacific) designed around culturally appropriate food choices, when compared to current ‘best practice' recommendations for healthy eating in a Pacific employee group. Abstracts and information about the Ancestral Health Symposium can be found at www.ancestralhealth.org/ahs14-program.
Views: 3075 AncestryFoundation
Muscle Strength, Physiology, and an Ancestral Approach to Back Pain  — Matt Smith, M.D. (AHS14)
 
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More Than Bones: Muscle Strength, Physiology, and an Ancestral Approach to Back Pain Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is one of the most common reasons to visit a physician. This condition is often disabling to the patient and it is an enormous economic burden secondary to both direct and indirect costs. While CLBP is very common, diagnosis of its etiology is often difficult. It is widely known that there is not a one to one correlation with anatomic pathology as seen with radiographic imaging of the spine and CLBP as experienced by the patient. Surgery, percutaneous image-guided procedures, oral medication, and traditional physical therapy are widely used to address CLBP, though often with limited success. Yet, there has been little clinical attention to date on the therapeutic effect of improved physical strength and hypertrophy of the muscles surrounding the spine. Nonetheless, there is ample evidence in the literature that hypertrophy of the muscles that support the spine is inversely correlated with CLBP. There is also evidence that a wide variety of factors, physiological and otherwise, are major determinants of the nature and severity of this condition. It is thus proposed that many of the structural abnormalities commonly attributed to CLBP are only a relatively small part of its overall etiology. This implies that a normalization of muscle strength and the adoption of behaviors promoting the optimal physiological milieu of the spine may be the optimal treatment for the vast majority of individuals with CLBP. Thus while CLBP is a condition endemic to both modern and ancestral societies, there appear to be mechanisms innate to human physiology that we may better utilize to combat this condition. Abstracts and information about the Ancestral Health Symposium can be found at www.ancestralhealth.org/ahs14-program.
Views: 3732 AncestryFoundation
100 Minutes With Aaron - One Family's Experience with Perinatal Hospice
 
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This film will explores one family's journey with the Roger Neilson House Perinatal Hospice and the 100 precious minutes that they spent with their son.
Women’s Depression & How to Heal with ‘A Mind of Your Own’ | By Kelly Brogan M.D.
 
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Dr. Kelly Brogan believes it's time for a meaningful revolution in healing. In her new book 'A Mind of Your Own' she reveals truths about women's depression, how to holistically recover without a single prescription, and how to self-empower to reclaim your life. Be sure to pick up a copy on sale March 15, 2016! Subscribe to Book Studio 16 to see all the newest videos! - http://goo.gl/Rge4H3 Discover more great books and authors at: http://www.harpercollins.com “A Mind of Your Own is must reading for everyone who has bought into the idea that drugs are the best answer to anxiety and depression. With the research to prove it Dr. Kelly Brogan lays out a path to help you reclaim your mind and your brain health.” — Christiane Northrup, MD, New York Times bestselling author of Women's Bodies, Women's Wisdom and Goddesses Never Age “A Mind of Your Own leverages the most forward-minded clinical research combined with a healthy dose of compassionate holism to bring forth a revolution in treating mood disorders. Dr. Brogan’s program is a soundly welcomed bright light in a world otherwise focused solely on pharmaceuticals.” — David Perlmutter, MD, author of #1 New York Times bestseller Grain Brain and Brain Maker To learn more, please visit http://kellybroganmd.com. Depression is not a disease. It is a symptom. Recent years have seen a shocking increase in antidepressant use the world over, with 1 in 4 women starting their day with medication. These drugs have steadily become the panacea for everything from grief, irritability, panic attacks, to insomnia, PMS, and stress. But the truth is, what women really need can’t be found at a pharmacy. According to Dr. Kelly Brogan, antidepressants not only overpromise and underdeliver, but their use may permanently disable the body’s self-healing potential. We need a new paradigm: The best way to heal the mind is to heal the whole body. In this groundbreaking, science-based and holistic approach, Dr. Brogan shatters the mythology conventional medicine has built around the causes and treatment of depression. Based on her expert interpretation of published medical findings, combined with years of experience from her clinical practice, Dr. Brogan illuminates the true cause of depression: it is not simply a chemical imbalance, but a lifestyle crisis that demands a reset. It is a signal that the interconnected systems in the body are out of balance – from blood sugar, to gut health, to thyroid function– and inflammation is at the root. A Mind of Your Own offers an achievable, step-by-step 30-day action plan—including powerful dietary interventions, targeted nutrient support, detoxification, sleep, and stress reframing techniques—women can use to heal their bodies, alleviate inflammation, and feel like themselves again without a single prescription. Bold, brave, and revolutionary, A Mind of Your Own takes readers on a journey of self-empowerment for radical transformation that goes far beyond symptom relief. Book Studio 16 is your home for the best literary content on YouTube. Enjoy our library of exclusive content featuring interviews with your favorite authors, cover reveals, book trailers and more.
Views: 1151 Book Studio 16
Jo Elliott, Sister
 
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Sister, Jo Elliott, shares an insight into her role with Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust. Jo is one of the 8,000 Mid Yorkshire Hospitals staff playing a vital role in providing quality care to thousands of people living across Wakefield and North Kirklees each year. Our staff are our greatest asset, and we are proud to have a hard working, talented, and dynamic work force who strive every day to provide quality care and support to those who use our services. Our mission is to recruit, develop and retain skilled and motivated people who embody the Trust's core values of caring, respect, high standards and improving. We do this by creating a supportive working environment -in first class facilities- where excellence and innovation is valued and celebrated; by providing excellent training and development opportunities, and by offering a comprehensive package of staff benefits to reward our employees for their hard work and commitment. But don't just take our word for it - watch our video and see for yourself what's on offer at Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust.
Views: 632 MidYorksNHSTrust