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USACE - Afghanistan Construction
 
01:42
KANDAHAR, Afghanistan (Dec. 5, 2012) -- The United States and its coalition partners sent military forces to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in October 2001. A six-person U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Forward Engineer Support Team deployed with the U.S. Army's XVIII Airborne Corps to provide engineering, construction, planning, contracting and real estate services. The U.S. Forces mission and long-term commitment to Afghanistan prompted USACE to bolster its presence in Afghanistan in 2004 with a Corps of Engineers district headquartered in Kabul. The district's personnel provided a full-range of engineering expertise to the combatant commanders. The question was not whether the forces needed facilities from which to operate, but rather what kind and how permanent the structures needed to be? The answer was not simple. Some locations had one level of need while others had more, or less. USACE engineers, working with U.S. Forces-Afghanistan leaders, began designing military bases and facilities that met the current and future needs of the force and from which U.S. forces could execute their mission. The deploying troops needed runways, taxiways, hangars, billeting, dining facilities, electricity, fresh and wastewater solutions, work spaces, roads, fuel depots and warehouses. USACE played a role in that early mission by designing and constructing facilities to meet those growing needs. Five years later, in 2009, President Obama ordered a 30,000 U.S. troop surge. USACE created a second district, the Afghanistan Engineer District-South in Kandahar on September 29, 2009 to better manage the increase in military construction requirements. Since its beginning in 2009, the Afghanistan Engineer District-South has awarded 46 contracts for military construction and has completed 35 of them. Those 35 projects, in south and west Afghanistan, are valued at about $540 million. The South District has 11 more military construction projects which will be done by the spring of 2013, one slated for completion in the fall of 2013 and one slated for award in late December 2012. The larger-scale and more costly military construction projects were built on Kandahar Airfield in Kandahar province and Shindand Air Base in Herat province. The South District also completed several more construction projects at Forward Operating Bases and other smaller installations. For instance, temporary housing on FOB Dwyer in Helmand province and FOB Wolverine in Zabul province gave U.S. Forces a safe and comfortable place to live. USACE built fire stations at Multi-National Base Tarin Kowt in Uruzgan province and FOB Ramrod in Kandahar province to create safer installations from which our forces could conduct their missions. USACE also oversaw the construction of wastewater treatment facilities on MNB Tarin Kowt, Kandahar Airfield, Shindand Air Base, FOBs Delaram and Dwyer to improve sanitary conditions while troops remain in Afghanistan. "When we transition in 2014, our completed military construction program will have totaled about $706 million," said Army Col. Vincent Quarles, Afghanistan Engineer District-South commander. "We are finishing up some critical construction that will facilitate the return of vehicles and equipment to the U.S. We are also finishing the last few aircraft hangers, warehouses, roads, utility upgrades and other enduring facilities that support our forces." Click here for the entire article: http://www.army.mil/article/92412/
Views: 1557 CORPSCONNECTION
Dam builders critique lean construction
 
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Commonly called the "war room," the Olmsted Locks and Dam project operations control center is housed in trailers on the edge of the yard where the gigantic concrete dam shells are fabricated before being placed in the Ohio River. On its walls are boards covered in color-coded sticky-note paper, such as red for iron workers and orange for carpenters. The notes represent a three-week production plan in single-day increments for current and future work. Team leaders, foremen and superintendents take turns describing on-going and upcoming work in their areas of operation during their regular meetings. They coordinate for material and equipment and synchronize their work with the other trades scheduled for the same area immediately before and after their own teams. This detailed construction preparation and tracking process is known as Assured Production Planning and Control, one of the five components that make up the Construction Project Production Management System (CP2Ms®) instituted at Olmsted in 2011. (Video by Brad Bell, Production Manager for URS-WG and Alberici Construction)
Views: 5149 LouisvilleUSACE
Important Link in USACE Construction
 
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Managing millions of dollars of construction takes experience and attention to detail. The Contracting Officer Representative is a very important link in that process. Patrick Bloodgood introduces us to one in Virginia. This segment is part of our BUILDING STRONG People campaign which shines the spotlight on our diverse team.
Views: 511 CORPSCONNECTION
USACE - Green Housing
 
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For more than 40 years, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has been working hard to be good environmental stewards. During the past decade, those efforts have expanded to embrace sustainability -- an umbrella concept that encompasses energy, climate change and the environment to ensure that what we do today doesn't negatively impact tomorrow. Through our work in the environmental and sustainability arenas through all our mission areas (civil works, military missions and research and development), we are making smart investments for the future, saving taxpayer dollars, and working in collaboration with other federal agencies and our partners. This video shows how USACE is supporting Army green initiatives providing 'green housing'. Carlos Lazo reports from California. Available in high definition. http://www.usace.army.mil/Missions/Sustainability/GoingGreenCampaign.aspx
Views: 639 CORPSCONNECTION
USACE - Sustainable Energy
 
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As the nation's environmental engineer, the U.S. Army Corps manages one of the largest federal environmental missions in the United States: Restoring degraded ecosystems Constructing sustainable facilities Regulating waterways and managing natural resources Cleaning up contaminated sites from past military activities The responsibility to deliver environmentally sound projects and services to our customers touches every program within the Corps: Military Programs, Civil Works and Research and Development. The scope and magnitude of environmental issues that the Corps addresses make it stand out among other federal agencies. But it is more than one agency can do on its own, it requires working in partnership with others to ensure our environmental efforts meet the needs of the American public. The Army Corps of Engineers continually partners with other federal and state agencies, non-governmental organizations and academic institutions to find innovative solutions to challenges that affect everyone: sustainability, climate change, endangered species, environmental cleanup, ecosystem restoration and more. The Army Corps of Engineers' environmental professionals are key resources for anyone inside or outside the Army family, wherever and whenever environmental solutions are sought. The breadth and depth of skills found within the workforce gives it the ability to seek the best solution to environmental challenges. The seven Environmental Operating Principles, or the Corps' green ethics, are being incorporated into all Corps business lines to achieve a sustainable environment. Restoring Ecosystems The Corps works to restore degraded ecosystem structure, function and dynamic processes to a more natural condition: Through large-scale ecosystem restoration projects, such as the Everglades, the Louisiana Coastal Area, the Missouri River, and the Great Lakes By employing system-wide watershed approaches to problem solving and management for smaller ecosystem restoration projects Constructing Sustainable Facilities The Corps designs and builds sustainable communities and facilities for the Department of Defense by: Incorporating sustainable design criteria into military construction and training lands projects Developing techniques to divert military construction waste from landfills through recycling and finding reuse opportunities Minimizing the use of hazardous materials Establishing the Center for the Advancement of Sustainability Innovations, a one-stop shop for sustainable planning and design expertise. Regulating Waterways and Managing Natural Resources The Corps regulates work in the nation's wetlands and waters, with a goal of protecting the aquatic environment while allowing responsible development. The regulatory program works to ensure no net loss of wetlands while issuing about 90,000 permits a year. With nearly 12 million acres of land and water to manage, the Corps is: Responsible for the well-being of 53 special status species Using Environmental Management Systems to integrate the Environmental Operating Principles into Corps operations to achieve waste reduction, recycling and energy efficiency goals Restoring environmental health to aquatic resources Cleanup and Protection Activities Corps environmental cleanup programs focus on reducing risk and protecting human health and the environment in a timely and cost-effective manner. The Corps manages, designs and executes a full range of cleanup and protection activities, such as: Cleaning up sites contaminated with hazardous, toxic or radioactive waste or ordnance through the Formerly Used Defense Sites program Cleaning up low-level radioactive waste from the nation's early atomic weapons program through the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Supporting the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by cleaning up Superfund sites and working with its Brownfields and Urban Waters programs Supporting the Army through the Base Realignment and Closure Act program Ensuring that facilities comply with federal, state and local environmental laws Conserving cultural and natural resources Bottom Line The Corps' goal for its environmental mission is to restore ecosystem structure and processes, manage our land, resources and construction activities in a sustainable manner, and support cleanup and protection activities efficiently and effectively, all while leaving the smallest footprint behind. Read more: http://www.dvidshub.net/video/142029/usace-sustainable-energy#.T48yD80hR40#ixzz1sQiKLBo6
Views: 1105 CORPSCONNECTION
Project Management for Engineers
 
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Professor Lon Cook shares his experience with project management in the pharmaceutical and medical device industry. He relates several examples where project management played a critical role in driving a project to successful completion. Engineers are sometimes put into positions where they are managing people and resources. This presentation is an overview of scheduling using Gantt charts, strategies with under-performing team members, and reporting progress on the critical path.
Views: 12975 APMonitor.com
Joplin PRT
 
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This video, shot in July, is about the New York District Planning and Response Team that is still deployed to Joplin, Mo., as part of the tornado recovery efforts. The team is managing the construction of temporary critical public facilities and two temporary fire stations and is finishing temporary facilities for eight hard hit schools. They are working with the the Corps' Kansas City District, which is the lead for the Corps' overall response there. (by: Hector Mosley, public affairs, USACE, New York District) (film credit: Christoher Gardner)
USACE employees take future engineers on construction site tour
 
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On this edition of the AFN Wiesbaden Update: When you were in eighth grade did you know what your future career was going to be? We'll go on a engineering tour with one Wiesbaden student whose learning what it takes to achieve his goals. That's what's happening on today's AFN Wiesbaden Update. (Courtesy of AFN Wiesbaden)
USACE military construction around Europe
 
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A portion of a news report by Mary Cochran about the increase of military construction projects in Europe, managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Europe District.
Civil works transformation
 
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The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is transforming its civil works program to best serve the public, meet the nation's water resource needs and help the Corps remain relevant in the 21st century. Story: http://1.usa.gov/Wc0368
Views: 1049 SacramentoDistrict
Road Construction Environment Damage
 
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These construction projects are just not worth it. Its time to start putting these monies into mass transit including subways and various rail cars. Better urban planning is also needed. The next links have useful information for you. Code of Federal Regulations : http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/ECFR?page=browse 33 CFR 328 Definitions of Waters of the United States 40 CFR 260 Hazardous Waste Management System: General 40 CFR 261 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste 40 CFR 262 Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste 40 CFR 279 Standards for the Management of Used Oil 40 CFR 302 Designation, Reportable Quantities, and Notification 40 CFR 355 Emergency Planning and Notification 40 CFR 68 Chemical Accident Prevention Provisions 49 CFR 171 - 178 Hazardous Materials Regulations 40 CFR 150 - 189 Pesticide Programs U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS (USACE) : http://www.usace.army.mil/SafetyandOccupationalHealth/SafetyandHealthRequirementsManual.aspx EM 385-1-1 (2014) Safety and Health Requirements Manual U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS (USACE) : http://el.erdc.usace.army.mil/elpubs/pdf/wlman87.pdf WETLANDS DELINEATION MANUAL (1987) Corps of Engineers Wetlands Delineation Manual USACE SECTION 01 57 20.00 10 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION http://www.wbdg.org/ccb/DOD/UFGS_old/UFGS 01 57 20.00 10.pdf
Views: 295 utahjames53
USACE Technology on Front Lines
 
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The Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) is a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers laboratory organization that provides science, technology, and expertise in engineering and environmental sciences in support of our Armed Forces and the Nation. The lab has been named Army's Top Lab numerous times and the diverse team of scientists works to protect lives. This clip highlights technology that is making a difference for our war fighters.
Views: 1470 CORPSCONNECTION
USACE - Net Zero Installations
 
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The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is supporting the Army in reaching important energy security and sustainability goals. Reducing energy dependence, increasing energy efficiency and adopting renewable and alternative energy sources is one of USACE's top priorities. USACE Sacramento District is helping build a military base for the future at Fort Hunter Liggett, California, one of several pilot installations selected to be net zero energy and net zero waste by 2020. Net zero means the installation will create as much energy as it uses, and reuse and recover all of its waste products. The district is nearing completion on the second of four solar microgrid projects at the installation. John Prettyman reports from California. More about USACE Sustainability: http://www.usace.army.mil/Missions/Sustainability/GoingGreenCampaign.aspx
Views: 289 CORPSCONNECTION
Engineers in Combat in World War II 1957 US Army; Army Corps of Engineers
 
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more at: http://quickfound.net/links/military_news_and_links.html " WORLD WAR II ENGINEER MISSION IN COMBAT - TRAINING AT ENGINEER SCHOOL, FT BELVOIR, VA. ENGINEERING ACTIVITIES DURING WW II IN THE EUROPEAN AND PACIFIC THEATERS OF OPERATION." US Army Film MF5-8854 Public domain film from the National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Army_Corps_of_Engineers The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE, also sometimes shortened to CoE) is a federal agency and a major Army command made up of some 38,000 civilian and military personnel, making it the world's largest public engineering, design and construction management agency. Although generally associated with dams, canals and flood protection in the United States, USACE is involved in a wide range of public works support to the nation and the Department of Defense throughout the world. The Corps of Engineers provides outdoor recreation opportunities to the public, and provides 24% of U.S. hydropower capacity. The Corps' mission is to provide vital public engineering services in peace and war to strengthen the nation's security, energize the economy, and reduce risks from disasters. Their most visible missions include: - Planning, designing, building, and operating locks and dams. Other civil engineering projects include flood control, beach nourishment, and dredging for waterway navigation. - Design and construction of flood protection systems through various federal mandates (see Public Laws below). - Design and construction management of military facilities for the Army, Air Force, Army Reserve and Air Force Reserve and other Defense and Federal agencies. - Environmental regulation and ecosystem restoration. The Corps' vision is having a great engineering force of highly disciplined people working with partners through disciplined thought and action to deliver innovative and sustainable solutions to the nation's engineering challenges... The history of United States Army Corps of Engineers can be traced back to 16 June 1775, when the Continental Congress organized an army with a chief engineer and two assistants. Colonel Richard Gridley became General George Washington's first chief engineer; however, it was not until 1779 that Congress created a separate Corps of Engineers. One of its first tasks was to build fortifications near Boston at Bunker Hill. The first Corps was mostly composed of French subjects, who had been hired by General Washington from the service of Louis XVI. The Corps of Engineers as it is known today came into being on 16 March 1802, when President Thomas Jefferson was authorized to "organize and establish a Corps of Engineers ... that the said Corps ... shall be stationed at West Point in the State of New York and shall constitute a Military Academy." Until 1866, the superintendent of the United States Military Academy was always an engineer officer. During the first half of the 19th century, West Point was the major and, for a while, the only engineering school in the country. The Corps's authority over river works in the United States began with its fortification of New Orleans after the War of 1812... The Army Corps of Engineers played an instrumental role in the American Civil War. Many of the men who would serve in the top leadership in this institution were West Point graduates, who rose to military fame and power during the Civil War. Some of these men were Union Generals George McClellan, Henry Halleck, George Meade, and Confederate generals Robert E. Lee, Joseph Johnston, and P.G.T. Beauregard... In 1944, specially-trained army combat engineers were assigned to blow up underwater obstacles and clear defended ports during the invasion of Normandy. During World War II, the Army Corps of Engineers in the European Theater of Operations was responsible for building countless bridges and building or maintaining roads vital to the Allied advance across Europe into the heart of Germany. In the Pacific theater, the Pioneer troops were formed, a hand-selected unit of volunteer Army combat engineers trained in jungle warfare, knife fighting, and unarmed jujitsu (hand-to-hand combat) techniques. Working in camouflage, the Pioneers cleared jungle and prepared routes of advance and established bridgeheads for the infantry as well as demolishing enemy installations...
Views: 8498 Jeff Quitney
Panel: US Army Corps of Engineers
 
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Panel: Civil Works and Planning Process -- Moderator, Mike Giari Tom Kendall- USACE (planning & programs) 6 Steps Documentation & Briefing NEPA / CEQA Resource Agency Consultation Dave Doak -- USACE (pre-construction and design contracting) Reconnaissance Study Feasibility Phase Pre-Construction Engineering & Design Construction Operations & Maintenance Richard Sinkoff - Port of Oakland, Fifty Foot Deepening What Worked What Did Not Work What were the results
USACE - 3D Printing
 
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SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- In the film "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids," a scientist creates a machine that shrinks large items down to very small sizes. But something goes wrong when he mistakenly shrinks four kids to the size of ants, providing them with a very different view of their world, and some wild adventures as they try to get back to reality - and their normal size. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District uses a similar machine to design its most complicated projects - minus the hi-jinks. For the past four years, the Sacramento District has used a 3-D printer to build scale models of two of its largest construction projects, the Folsom Dam auxiliary spillway and upgrades to Isabella Lake Dam. Based on computer-aided design, the 3-D printer allows full-scale project components to be shrunk into a handheld model that team members can use to better visualize and conceptualize their work like never before. "While this printer is becoming common throughout the industry, the only way we would've been able to get models like this before would've been to hand-craft it," said building information modeling manager Kevin Russ, who transforms a computer drawing into the final model. Now, thanks to precision accuracy and durable parts, the scaled models are not only proving to be invaluable to project staff, but also superior showpieces to help explain complicated Corps construction projects. The printer uses strands of ABS plastic, material typically used for household drainage pipes, less than a tenth-of-an-inch thick to create perfectly-scaled 3-D models in a matter of hours. About 25 miles northeast of downtown Sacramento, construction crews are working to complete one of the Corps' biggest projects—a new spillway at Folsom Dam, designed to help reduce the risk of flooding throughout the Sacramento region. The centerpiece of the project is a 367-foot-wide by 146-foot-high control structure, essentially a second dam. With an estimated project cost of more than $750 million, it's important to be able to show and describe how the project will work to government leaders, the public and project staff. "When compared to a 2-D drawing or rendering that only shows the outer surface of the project, a 3-D model provides a much better way to help explain what the project is and how all of its pieces will function to a non-technical audience," said Dave Neff, technical lead for the auxiliary spillway project. While many models can be printed in three or four hours, a 1/240-scale model of Folsom Dam's new dam took more than three days to complete. It's built in sections that come apart like building blocks, revealing the interior workings of the structure. "Having the various components allows you to peel back and see how it all fits together and how the pieces interact on the inside," Neff said. "The shafts, stairways and even the equipment room are all there for you to see." Seeing it all together instead of on separate pages of plans helps the project staff better understand how maintenance or other facility needs can be met, Neff said. The models have helped on other major projects, as well. Isabella Lake Dam, located 40 miles northeast of Bakersfield, is nearly 60 years old and among the Corps' most at-risk dams. In 2006, the Sacramento District began studying how it could best modernize the dam and reduce the likelihood of dam failure, which would inundate most of Bakersfield and imperil most of its 350,000 residents. The Isabella Dam Safety Modification Project was approved by Corps headquarters in December 2012. But to get there, project staff considered a wide array of solutions including some uncommon design proposals. 3-D models helped them evaluate the options. "It's said a picture is worth a thousand words, well a 3-D model is worth 10 times that," said Nathan Cox, lead hydraulic engineer for the Isabella Dam project. Moving forward, the team plans to continue taking advantage of the 3-D printer as the project shifts from study to design. "It has been extremely helpful to have the technology in-house," Cox said. "As we move into the preconstruction engineering and design phase, we plan on creating a model of the Borel Tunnel to better see its unique, non-conventional design." While all four kids in the movie return to their normal size, only a few Corps 3-D models eventually become life-size. But even the ones that don't make the cut help designers conceptualize the final project. "It really is just an invaluable tool," Neff said. More USACE news at www.usace.army.mil.
Views: 817 CORPSCONNECTION
USACE - DoDEA STEM Partnership
 
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DoDEA , Army Corps of Engineers Form STEM Partnership ALEXANDRIA, VA -- The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) are partnering to advance Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) in DoDEA classrooms around the world. The initiative becomes official at a Partnership Agreement Signing Ceremony to be held on May 20, at 1 p.m., at Ashurst Elementary School located on Marine Corps Base Quantico. The partnership is the first STEM initiative between the U.S. Army and DoDEA. It leverages the missions, talents and resources of both DoDEA and USACE to advance STEM in elementary and secondary school curriculum. The program will include the development of a specific civil works project or other USACE function that directly relates to DoDEA's K-12 STEM content and curriculum. The USACE interns and DoDEA students will collaborate on projects and their efforts will culminate in a competition and awards ceremony held two times each school year. Marilee Fitzgerald, DoDEA Director, expressed the enthusiasm and commitment of DoDEA's teachers and staff for the program. "DoDEA is truly honored and grateful for the opportunity to partner with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to focus on preparing the next generation to develop the skills, capacity, flexibility and perseverance they will need to ensure our nation continues to be a world leader in the STEM fields," said Ms. Fitzgerald. This collaborative effort will form a team that will make an impact on the lives of our students, excite them about STEM's potential and inspire them to pursue a STEM-related career. We feel the USACE team is uniquely positioned from several aspects to help us maximize the benefits of this program," Ms. Fitzgerald added. In addition to the USACE's expertise and talent in building and maintaining our Nation's infrastructure; researching and developing technology for our Armed Forces and using their engineering expertise to promote stability and improve quality of life, they are part of the fabric of DoDEA's mission. They are deeply involved in the design and construction of our schools and the members of their team live and work in the communities where our schools operate," she said. Commanding General and Chief of Engineers, Lt. Gen. Thomas P. Bostick, echoed Ms. Fitzgerald's sentiments and emphasized USACE's vision for the program; the importance of the STEM partnership with DoDEA, and the opportunities it will provide for DoDEA students around the world. "The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is excited about the partnership with DoDEA and our ability to leverage our scientists and engineers to provide STEM-related expertise to military children around the world. We are committed to teaming with others to strengthen STEM programs that inspire young people to pursue careers in these fields." The partnership's focus aligns with the White House and Department of Education's focus on educating global leaders and preparing students for STEM careers in the 21st Century global economy. According to research performed by the Department of Education, careers in all STEM-related fields will increase 14% between now and 2020. As the Department of Education Chart below indicates, even more job growth is expected in STEM-related fields such as mathematics, computer science, and biomedical fields. More USACE STEM information at: www.usace.army.mil/stem
Views: 1031 CORPSCONNECTION
Military Roads: Road Expedients 1943 US Army Training Film; Temporary Road Construction
 
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more at: http://quickfound.net/links/military_news_and_links.html "EXPEDIENT METHODS FOR ROAD CONSTRUCTION IN SWAMPY AND SANDY GROUND. USE OF CORDUROY MATS, WIRE MESH AND STEEL LANDING MATS." US Army Training Film TF5-1193 Reupload of a previously uploaded film, in one piece instead of multiple parts, and with improved video & sound. Public domain film from the National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Army_Corps_of_Engineers The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE, also sometimes shortened to CoE) is a federal agency and a major Army command made up of some 38,000 civilian and military personnel, making it the world's largest public engineering, design and construction management agency. Although generally associated with dams, canals and flood protection in the United States, USACE is involved in a wide range of public works support to the nation and the Department of Defense throughout the world. The Corps of Engineers provides outdoor recreation opportunities to the public, and provides 24% of U.S. hydropower capacity. The Corps' mission is to provide vital public engineering services in peace and war to strengthen the nation's security, energize the economy, and reduce risks from disasters. Their most visible missions include: - Planning, designing, building, and operating locks and dams. Other civil engineering projects include flood control, beach nourishment, and dredging for waterway navigation. - Design and construction of flood protection systems through various federal mandates (see Public Laws below). - Design and construction management of military facilities for the Army, Air Force, Army Reserve and Air Force Reserve and other Defense and Federal agencies. - Environmental regulation and ecosystem restoration. The Corps' vision is having a great engineering force of highly disciplined people working with partners through disciplined thought and action to deliver innovative and sustainable solutions to the nation's engineering challenges... The history of United States Army Corps of Engineers can be traced back to 16 June 1775, when the Continental Congress organized an army with a chief engineer and two assistants. Colonel Richard Gridley became General George Washington's first chief engineer; however, it was not until 1779 that Congress created a separate Corps of Engineers. One of its first tasks was to build fortifications near Boston at Bunker Hill. The first Corps was mostly composed of French subjects, who had been hired by General Washington from the service of Louis XVI. The Corps of Engineers as it is known today came into being on 16 March 1802, when President Thomas Jefferson was authorized to "organize and establish a Corps of Engineers ... that the said Corps ... shall be stationed at West Point in the State of New York and shall constitute a Military Academy." Until 1866, the superintendent of the United States Military Academy was always an engineer officer. During the first half of the 19th century, West Point was the major and, for a while, the only engineering school in the country. The Corps's authority over river works in the United States began with its fortification of New Orleans after the War of 1812... The Army Corps of Engineers played an instrumental role in the American Civil War. Many of the men who would serve in the top leadership in this institution were West Point graduates, who rose to military fame and power during the Civil War. Some of these men were Union Generals George McClellan, Henry Halleck, George Meade, and Confederate generals Robert E. Lee, Joseph Johnston, and P.G.T. Beauregard... In 1944, specially-trained army combat engineers were assigned to blow up underwater obstacles and clear defended ports during the invasion of Normandy. During World War II, the Army Corps of Engineers in the European Theater of Operations was responsible for building countless bridges and building or maintaining roads vital to the Allied advance across Europe into the heart of Germany. In the Pacific theater, the Pioneer troops were formed, a hand-selected unit of volunteer Army combat engineers trained in jungle warfare, knife fighting, and unarmed jujitsu (hand-to-hand combat) techniques. Working in camouflage, the Pioneers cleared jungle and prepared routes of advance and established bridgeheads for the infantry as well as demolishing enemy installations...
Views: 8367 Jeff Quitney
Construction in Bulgaria
 
01:00
The North Atlantic Division of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is building up three areas of a training base in eastern Bulgaria. Justin Ward reports. http://www.usace.army.mil
Views: 401 soldiersmediacenter
USACE Sacramento jobs tutorial
 
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Learn how to search for jobs offered specifically by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District.
Views: 59 SacramentoDistrict
USACE FUDS
 
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ARMY.MIL - The Corps of Engineers is protecting human health and the environment by cleaning up formerly used defense sites across the U.S. Hank Heusinkveld reports from Butner, N.C. http://www.usace.army.mil
Views: 270 soldiersmediacenter
Civil Level One: Tools
 
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This video is a part of the Civil Level One training. When a disaster strikes, emergency responders for the Corps of Engineers are part of the quilt of volunteer efforts and the National Response Framework that drives the Federal Response. In order to be prepared for and work efficiently during an emergency, the USACE offers several tools and capabilities to its personnel. This video will provide an overview of the tools and capabilities available to emergency responders, as well as a working knowledge of the PRT Level One and Level Two curriculum. This video will provide awareness for the training and exercise suite of support tools and learning media, ENGLink Interactive, the Remedial Action Plan program, the Deployable Tactical Operations System, Corps of Engineers Mission Guides, Advance Contract Initiatives, and Standard Operating Procedures for Corps missions. Information will also be provided on Field Operation Guides and the Readiness Support Center and its support capabilities.
Views: 2961 RSC USACE
USACE Builds up Bulgaria
 
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As part of U.S. Army Europes Task Force East initiative, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Europe District is in Bulgaria overseeing $50 million in construction for a permanent forward operating site, upgrading the existing tent facilities for future joint training opportunities between the U.S. and Bulgaria. In addition to roads, walkways, and parking areas, facilities to be built on the 135-acre site in Eastern Bulgaria include barracks, a fitness center, dining and medical facilities, and operational, maintenance, and storage facilities, all of which are expected to be used for many years in the future.
Views: 1941 Europe District USACE
Military Road Construction: "Road Expedients" pt2-2 1943 US Army Training Film World War II
 
08:41
NEW VERSION in one piece instead of multiple parts, and with improved video & sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=neFh08sEdjs more at: http://quickfound.net/links/military_news_and_links.html "EXPEDIENT METHODS FOR ROAD CONSTRUCTION IN SWAMPY AND SANDY GROUND. USE OF CORDUROY MATS, WIRE MESH AND STEEL LANDING MATS." US Army Training Film TF5-1193 Public domain film from the National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). Split with MKVmerge GUI (part of MKVToolNix), the same software can recombine the downloaded parts (in mp4 format): http://www.bunkus.org/videotools/mkvtoolnix/doc/mkvmerge-gui.html part 2: http://youtu.be/lGFVgs9C-xY http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Army_Corps_of_Engineers The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE, also sometimes shortened to CoE) is a federal agency and a major Army command made up of some 38,000 civilian and military personnel, making it the world's largest public engineering, design and construction management agency. Although generally associated with dams, canals and flood protection in the United States, USACE is involved in a wide range of public works support to the nation and the Department of Defense throughout the world. The Corps of Engineers provides outdoor recreation opportunities to the public, and provides 24% of U.S. hydropower capacity. The Corps' mission is to provide vital public engineering services in peace and war to strengthen the nation's security, energize the economy, and reduce risks from disasters. Their most visible missions include: - Planning, designing, building, and operating locks and dams. Other civil engineering projects include flood control, beach nourishment, and dredging for waterway navigation. - Design and construction of flood protection systems through various federal mandates (see Public Laws below). - Design and construction management of military facilities for the Army, Air Force, Army Reserve and Air Force Reserve and other Defense and Federal agencies. - Environmental regulation and ecosystem restoration. The Corps' vision is having a great engineering force of highly disciplined people working with partners through disciplined thought and action to deliver innovative and sustainable solutions to the nation's engineering challenges... The history of United States Army Corps of Engineers can be traced back to 16 June 1775, when the Continental Congress organized an army with a chief engineer and two assistants. Colonel Richard Gridley became General George Washington's first chief engineer; however, it was not until 1779 that Congress created a separate Corps of Engineers. One of its first tasks was to build fortifications near Boston at Bunker Hill. The first Corps was mostly composed of French subjects, who had been hired by General Washington from the service of Louis XVI. The Corps of Engineers as it is known today came into being on 16 March 1802, when President Thomas Jefferson was authorized to "organize and establish a Corps of Engineers ... that the said Corps ... shall be stationed at West Point in the State of New York and shall constitute a Military Academy." Until 1866, the superintendent of the United States Military Academy was always an engineer officer. During the first half of the 19th century, West Point was the major and, for a while, the only engineering school in the country. The Corps's authority over river works in the United States began with its fortification of New Orleans after the War of 1812... The Army Corps of Engineers played an instrumental role in the American Civil War. Many of the men who would serve in the top leadership in this institution were West Point graduates, who rose to military fame and power during the Civil War. Some of these men were Union Generals George McClellan, Henry Halleck, George Meade, and Confederate generals Robert E. Lee, Joseph Johnston, and P.G.T. Beauregard... In 1944, specially-trained army combat engineers were assigned to blow up underwater obstacles and clear defended ports during the invasion of Normandy. During World War II, the Army Corps of Engineers in the European Theater of Operations was responsible for building countless bridges and building or maintaining roads vital to the Allied advance across Europe into the heart of Germany. In the Pacific theater, the Pioneer troops were formed, a hand-selected unit of volunteer Army combat engineers trained in jungle warfare, knife fighting, and unarmed jujitsu (hand-to-hand combat) techniques. Working in camouflage, the Pioneers cleared jungle and prepared routes of advance and established bridgeheads for the infantry as well as demolishing enemy installations...
Views: 11500 Jeff Quitney
USACE - Going Green at Fort Bragg
 
02:13
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is making smart investments for the future, saving taxpayer dollars and working with other agencies and partners to be true good stewards of our natural resources. The Corps is investing more than 20 million dollars in sustainability and energy efficient projects across USACE. This next report takes us to Fort Bragg where USACE is using green technology, which increases efficiency while lowering cost. Building green and being good stewards of taxpayer dollars are priorities for USACE. Hank Heusinkveld shows us more. More about USACE Sustainability at: http://www.usace.army.mil/Missions/Sustainability/GoingGreenCampaign.aspx
Views: 144 CORPSCONNECTION
HISTORY MAKING PROJECT IN NEW ORLEANS
 
02:00
THE LARGEST DESIGN-BUILD CIVIL WORKS PROJECT IN USACE HISTORY WILL HELP PROTECT THE PEOPLE OF NEW ORLEANS FROM FLOODING.
Views: 780 CORPSCONNECTION
US Army: Civilians deploy - US Corps of Engineers - Iraq and Afghanistan
 
02:10
http://imcom.korea.army.mil To learn more about living and serving in Korea with the US Army, visit our official website at: http://imcom.korea.army.mil Whether you are fresh off of active-duty, a military spouse or a seasoned professional, you will find a career with the U.S. Army in Korea both challenging and inspiring. If you ready to join an award winning team and embark on the adventure of a lifetime, you can learn more about living and working in Korea online: http://imcom.korea.army.mil Photos from the US Army in Korea can be viewed online at http://www.flickr.com/imcomkorea The Morning Calm Weekly command information newspaper is available online at http://imcom.korea.army.mil Published for those serving in the Republic of Korea - an assignment of choice.
Views: 2221 IMCOMKoreaRegion
Hurricane Sandy - USACE Recovery Efforts
 
01:42
In the 12 months since Hurricane Sandy struck the northeastern United States, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has completed repairs on 30 Sandy-damaged navigation channels and structures, completed restoration of the six engineered beach projects along the coast, and is actively working nearly 200 other projects to reduce the risk of future coastal storm damage. In the Corps' North Atlantic Division's footprint, which spans from Virginia to Maine, 14 beach restoration projects and 16 projects to repair navigation channels and structures are currently underway. Work also continues to expedite and complete 17 flood and storm damage reduction studies, all of which are 100 percent federally funded and could lead to construction of new coastal storm damage risk reduction projects. Additional work includes 18 "authorized but not yet constructed" projects slated to start in early 2014 that will reduce risk to areas that were vulnerable when Sandy hit. These projects, which would complement the previously constructed beach restoration projects, were previously designed and congressionally authorized but never moved forward due to a need to secure funding, a lack of easements, or both. Of the 18 projects in the North Atlantic Division, 11 are scheduled for New Jersey, five for New York, and one each in Delaware and Virginia. Within South Atlantic Division, one each is planned in North Carolina and Florida. Within the Ohio River and Great Lakes Division boundaries, one is planned at the Chautauqua Creek Dam in upstate New York. "The Corps leaned forward in its response to Hurricane Sandy to ensure the families in our region could return to their lives as quickly as possible," said Brig. Gen. Kent Savre, commanding general of the Army Corps' North Atlantic Division. "Likewise, we are leaning forward now with our partners to restore our coastlines so that we can mitigate risk from future storms." Using lessons learned during Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee, the Corps' Hurricane Sandy response role started with extensive pre-storm preparations, including standing up emergency operation centers, lowering pool elevations behind dams, issuing sandbags, and pre-positioning water and generators. After the storm, as part of the unified federal response, the Corps was called upon to unwater 475 million gallons of salt water from flooded critical infrastructure in the New York City metro area, install more than 200 generators to critical facilities such as hospitals and police stations; remove hurricane debris; refurbish 115 transitional housing units; provide more than 9 million liters of bottled water; and assist the U.S. Coast Guard in returning affected ports to operation. Since the passage of the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 in January, the Army Corps' focus has been on reducing the risk of future coastal storm damage to Atlantic Coast communities. In the eight months since federal funds were appropriated, the Corps has placed more than 40 percent of a total 26 million cubic yards of sand, which is enough sand to fill 19 Empire State Buildings, on identified beaches in Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Delaware and Virginia to restore dunes and berms to their pre-storm conditions. The beach restoration in all states is expected to be completed by fall 2014. The repair of navigation channels and structures, which began in February 2013, is scheduled for completion by spring 2015. "For many of us, this is not just a job," said Joseph Forcina, chief of the North Atlantic Division's Sandy Coastal Management Division. "We have been impacted; our families have been impacted. ... And we want to institute proper measures as quickly as possible to bring down the risk that some of these communities are currently working under." Consistent with the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013, the Army Corps is collaborating with federal, state, local and tribal partners on a North Atlantic Coast Comprehensive Study to assess the flood risks of vulnerable coastal populations in areas affected by Hurricane Sandy. The Comprehensive Study will apply a regional framework to reducing risk for vulnerable coastal populations, and is scheduled for submission to Congress in January 2015. To learn more about the North Atlantic Division's Sandy recovery progress and future plan, visit www.usace.army.mil/Sandy. Additional media resources are available on the site. Stay up to date by following us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/HurricaneSandyCoastalRecovery or visit nad.usace.army.mil/Sandy.
Views: 293 CORPSCONNECTION
Army Nuclear Power Program, 1969
 
23:29
Historical video (1969) that highlights the Army's Nuclear Power Program.
Views: 3784 USACE Baltimore
USACE - Supporting Sandy Recovery
 
00:32
QUEENS, N.Y. -- On the morning of Hurricane Sandy, Martha Militano, a Rockaways resident, packed an overnight bag and left for Brooklyn to stay the night with her son. The next day, after the storm had passed, she went back to her home on Beach 130th Street, where she had lived for the past 16 years and discovered everything was gone. "It's still so surreal," she said, standing in front of her home, Nov. 30, four weeks after Sandy, meeting with representatives from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Federal Emergency Management Agency to sign a right-of-entry form for debris removal. "I go back to this little place we're renting now, I sit on the bed, I look at the pile of clothes that I have and that's it and I say, 'What happened?'" On the evening of Oct. 29, Sandy barreled into the Rockaways in Queens with a massive 25-foot storm surge that left hundreds of homes flooded. Fires erupted in several areas and gale force winds scattered embers into the sky, some of them landing on Beach 130th Street, where 16 homes, including Militano's, burned to the ground. "I close my eyes and can still picture everything," she said. "Where do you start when you look at all this?" After three weeks of around-the-clock curbside debris pickup, the Army Corps has moved an estimated 223,000 cubic yards of debris out of New York City neighborhoods to permanent landfills upstate. Now the next phase of recovery begins -- private property debris removal or PPDR. On Nov. 30, several teams of Army Corps and FEMA real estate specialists and field assessors fanned out into neighborhoods of Queens, Brooklyn and Staten Island to meet homeowners and conduct site assessments. They were handed a list of property addresses either red-tagged (unfit to live) or gray-tagged (fire damage) by the city of New York immediately following Sandy. "Before we have authority to pick up anything off private property, we have to get a signed [ROE] from the homeowner or landowner," said Josh Jimerfield, a debris engineer for the Army Corps New York Recovery Field Office. Using hand-held smartphones with field data collection software, designed last year by the Army Corps' Engineer Research and Development Center, field assessors document properties using photos, videos and notes, all of which can be transmitted directly to a command center. What assessors are looking for are items such as debris volumes, household hazardous waste, white goods like refrigerators and washing machines, exposed basements, downed trees, even personal valuables that may need to be retrieved at the request of the homeowner. They also annotate access points onto a property so contractors can avoid utilities with their equipment. According to Jimerfield, real estate specialists help homeowners understand their rights and how federal assistance works. Field assessors sketch out a plan with homeowners that contractors are to follow when they arrive onsite to remove debris. "We had a home yesterday for instance. We met with the homeowner. He's got a swimming pool and a deck, both of which are largely undamaged. He doesn't want them touched," he said. "So we have to label that out very clearly for the contractor." The majority of work would be performed with skid-loaders with debris sorted and moved to the right-of-way for removal. Any demolition work would be done by the city with the Army Corps assisting with the removal of debris at the curb. Just how many homes are in need of PPDR assistance is largely unknown. Based on the city's model following Sandy, 82,000 homes could have been impacted in some way by the 1,000-mile-wide storm. "That's the number of homes in the storm surge," said Jay Hershey, a debris engineer from the Army Corps' Baltimore District. "Realistically, that number will be much smaller." Many of the residents from the 16 burned homes on Beach 130st Street walked up and down the block, Nov. 30, lending a hand or a hug to neighbors. "This neighborhood is awesome. Everybody looks out for everybody," said Militano. "It's like back in the day when kids played on the streets; they still do -- baseball, basketball hoops all over. We'll rebuild here, maybe not exactly the same way, but we'll rebuild."
Views: 224 CORPSCONNECTION
USACE - Getting Hurricane Sandy Debris Out of New York
 
02:24
BROOKLYN, New York -- BROOKLYN, New York -- Under mission assignment from the Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) awarded an $88 million task order under existing Advance Contracting Initiative contract to ECC Corporate, 1240 Bayshore Highway, Burlingame, Calif., to remove debris caused by Hurricane Sandy within New York areas impacted by the storm. ECC is removing household trash, debris, and vegetation from homes and businesses in the state of New York. This includes white goods (e.g., refrigerators, freezers, air conditioners), electronics, household hazardous waste chemicals, and construction debris of homes and businesses. Debris removal does not include removal of new construction material used for repair and restoration. The material is being hauled to temporary collection sites around the city then removed to permanent landfills. As of Nov. 13, crews have cleared about 20,680 cubic yards of debris from storm-damaged areas. Currently, nearly 300 loaders, bobcats, backhoes, dump and long haul trucks are working to remove debris under this Corps-managed FEMA mission. Within one week, USACE is anticipating having more than 1,300 pieces of contracted debris-removal equipment clearing an estimated 3.6 million cubic yards of material. Business owners interested in supporting Hurricane Sandy debris removal can visit http://www.nad.usace.army.mil/BusinessWithUs/Contracting.aspx to download a fillable form. Once completed, the form should be e-mailed to postsandycontracting@usace.army.mil. The information will be provided to current Advance Contracting Initiative contractors that have been awarded post-Sandy recovery contracts and to Corps acquisition teams and contracting officers who are planning future solicitations. Submission of the form does not guarantee you will be notified of all contracting opportunities. Business owners interested in supporting the New York debris removal mission can also contact Master Sgt. Charles Mason at (718) 888-3185, Charles.W.Mason@usace.army.mil.
Views: 538 CORPSCONNECTION
USACE - Supporting NYC
 
00:49
USACE has more than 3,000 employees within the North Atlantic Division, and at the peak of response activities an additional 990 team members from other USACE divisions were engaged to support the response mission. USACE debris teams are in ports, waterways and coastal areas in NJ and NY clearing debris along the Atlantic seaboard. Thirty-five debris teams are assisting local NY and NJ authorities. 74,346 cubic yards of debris have been removed within NY. Planning response teams also are assisting with debris management, infrastructure assessment, temporary roofing, critical public facilities, and temporary housing. With local authorities USACE concentrated pumping efforts at 14 critical locations as determined by local officials. Pumping is complete at all 14 locations. During de-watering operations USACE controlled 162 pumps and removed more than 475 million gallons of water equivalent to 720 Olympic-sized swimming pools. The USACE Water Delivery Mission is complete. USACE provided 512 truckloads (18,000 liters per load) of water to NY, NJ, PA, and WV. Video courtesy Mikell Moore, ACE-IT videographer. More information at www.usace.army.mil.
Views: 251 CORPSCONNECTION
Military Road Construction: "Road Expedients" pt1-2 1943 US Army Training Film World War II
 
11:45
NEW VERSION in one piece instead of multiple parts, and with improved video & sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=neFh08sEdjs more at: http://quickfound.net/links/military_news_and_links.html "EXPEDIENT METHODS FOR ROAD CONSTRUCTION IN SWAMPY AND SANDY GROUND. USE OF CORDUROY MATS, WIRE MESH AND STEEL LANDING MATS." US Army Training Film TF5-1193 Public domain film from the National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). Split with MKVmerge GUI (part of MKVToolNix), the same software can recombine the downloaded parts (in mp4 format): http://www.bunkus.org/videotools/mkvtoolnix/doc/mkvmerge-gui.html part 2: http://youtu.be/dgptPWVZ-3k http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Army_Corps_of_Engineers The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE, also sometimes shortened to CoE) is a federal agency and a major Army command made up of some 38,000 civilian and military personnel, making it the world's largest public engineering, design and construction management agency. Although generally associated with dams, canals and flood protection in the United States, USACE is involved in a wide range of public works support to the nation and the Department of Defense throughout the world. The Corps of Engineers provides outdoor recreation opportunities to the public, and provides 24% of U.S. hydropower capacity. The Corps' mission is to provide vital public engineering services in peace and war to strengthen the nation's security, energize the economy, and reduce risks from disasters. Their most visible missions include: - Planning, designing, building, and operating locks and dams. Other civil engineering projects include flood control, beach nourishment, and dredging for waterway navigation. - Design and construction of flood protection systems through various federal mandates (see Public Laws below). - Design and construction management of military facilities for the Army, Air Force, Army Reserve and Air Force Reserve and other Defense and Federal agencies. - Environmental regulation and ecosystem restoration. The Corps' vision is having a great engineering force of highly disciplined people working with partners through disciplined thought and action to deliver innovative and sustainable solutions to the nation's engineering challenges... The history of United States Army Corps of Engineers can be traced back to 16 June 1775, when the Continental Congress organized an army with a chief engineer and two assistants. Colonel Richard Gridley became General George Washington's first chief engineer; however, it was not until 1779 that Congress created a separate Corps of Engineers. One of its first tasks was to build fortifications near Boston at Bunker Hill. The first Corps was mostly composed of French subjects, who had been hired by General Washington from the service of Louis XVI. The Corps of Engineers as it is known today came into being on 16 March 1802, when President Thomas Jefferson was authorized to "organize and establish a Corps of Engineers ... that the said Corps ... shall be stationed at West Point in the State of New York and shall constitute a Military Academy." Until 1866, the superintendent of the United States Military Academy was always an engineer officer. During the first half of the 19th century, West Point was the major and, for a while, the only engineering school in the country. The Corps's authority over river works in the United States began with its fortification of New Orleans after the War of 1812... The Army Corps of Engineers played an instrumental role in the American Civil War. Many of the men who would serve in the top leadership in this institution were West Point graduates, who rose to military fame and power during the Civil War. Some of these men were Union Generals George McClellan, Henry Halleck, George Meade, and Confederate generals Robert E. Lee, Joseph Johnston, and P.G.T. Beauregard... In 1944, specially-trained army combat engineers were assigned to blow up underwater obstacles and clear defended ports during the invasion of Normandy. During World War II, the Army Corps of Engineers in the European Theater of Operations was responsible for building countless bridges and building or maintaining roads vital to the Allied advance across Europe into the heart of Germany. In the Pacific theater, the Pioneer troops were formed, a hand-selected unit of volunteer Army combat engineers trained in jungle warfare, knife fighting, and unarmed jujitsu (hand-to-hand combat) techniques. Working in camouflage, the Pioneers cleared jungle and prepared routes of advance and established bridgeheads for the infantry as well as demolishing enemy installations...
Views: 24224 Jeff Quitney
Jackson gets general overview of Nashville District construction projects
 
02:40
Maj. Gen. Donald E. Jackson, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers deputy commanding general for Civil and Emergency Operations, and engineering students of Tennessee Technological and Vanderbilt Universities visit Center Hill Dam, toured and received briefings of the Center Hill Dam Safety and multi-Turbine Generator Rehabilitation Projects March 29, 2016. (USACE Video by Ashley Webster)
Views: 409 nashvillecorps
Lock 5A Miter Gate Change
 
04:48
This time-lapse video shows the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Rock Island District's Mississippi River maintenance crew performing a 24-hour miter gate change at Lock 5A in Fountain City, Wisconsin. This critical work is needed to ensure the operational integrity of the aging lock and dam system. The work involves a complex series of actions using large-scale equipment and a team of highly skilled professionals to perform the maintenance in a single 24-hour closure, minimizing impacts to river navigation.
Hurricane Sandy Recovery - USACE
 
02:00
Since Sandy, many Army Corps' risk reduction projects completed, underway In the 12 months since Hurricane Sandy struck the northeastern United States, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has completed repairs on 30 Sandy-damaged navigation channels and structures, completed restoration of the six engineered beach projects along the coast, and is actively working nearly 200 other projects to reduce the risk of future coastal storm damage. In the Corps' North Atlantic Division's footprint, which spans from Virginia to Maine, 14 beach restoration projects and 16 projects to repair navigation channels and structures are currently underway. Work also continues to expedite and complete 17 flood and storm damage reduction studies, all of which are 100 percent federally funded and could lead to construction of new coastal storm damage risk reduction projects. Additional work includes 18 "authorized but not yet constructed" projects slated to start in early 2014 that will reduce risk to areas that were vulnerable when Sandy hit. These projects, which would complement the previously constructed beach restoration projects, were previously designed and congressionally authorized but never moved forward due to a need to secure funding, a lack of easements, or both. Of the 18 projects in the North Atlantic Division, 11 are scheduled for New Jersey, five for New York, and one each in Delaware and Virginia. Within South Atlantic Division, one each is planned in North Carolina and Florida. Within the Ohio River and Great Lakes Division boundaries, one is planned at the Chautauqua Creek Dam in upstate New York. "The Corps leaned forward in its response to Hurricane Sandy to ensure the families in our region could return to their lives as quickly as possible," said Brig. Gen. Kent Savre, commanding general of the Army Corps' North Atlantic Division. "Likewise, we are leaning forward now with our partners to restore our coastlines so that we can mitigate risk from future storms." Using lessons learned during Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee, the Corps' Hurricane Sandy response role started with extensive pre-storm preparations, including standing up emergency operation centers, lowering pool elevations behind dams, issuing sandbags, and pre-positioning water and generators. After the storm, as part of the unified federal response, the Corps was called upon to unwater 475 million gallons of salt water from flooded critical infrastructure in the New York City metro area, install more than 200 generators to critical facilities such as hospitals and police stations; remove hurricane debris; refurbish 115 transitional housing units; provide more than 9 million liters of bottled water; and assist the U.S. Coast Guard in returning affected ports to operation. Since the passage of the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 in January, the Army Corps' focus has been on reducing the risk of future coastal storm damage to Atlantic Coast communities. In the eight months since federal funds were appropriated, the Corps has placed more than 40 percent of a total 26 million cubic yards of sand, which is enough sand to fill 19 Empire State Buildings, on identified beaches in Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Delaware and Virginia to restore dunes and berms to their pre-storm conditions. The beach restoration in all states is expected to be completed by fall 2014. The repair of navigation channels and structures, which began in February 2013, is scheduled for completion by spring 2015. "For many of us, this is not just a job," said Joseph Forcina, chief of the North Atlantic Division's Sandy Coastal Management Division. "We have been impacted; our families have been impacted. ... And we want to institute proper measures as quickly as possible to bring down the risk that some of these communities are currently working under." Consistent with the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013, the Army Corps is collaborating with federal, state, local and tribal partners on a North Atlantic Coast Comprehensive Study to assess the flood risks of vulnerable coastal populations in areas affected by Hurricane Sandy. The Comprehensive Study will apply a regional framework to reducing risk for vulnerable coastal populations, and is scheduled for submission to Congress in January 2015. To learn more about the North Atlantic Division's Sandy recovery progress and future plan, visit www.usace.army.mil/Sandy. Additional media resources are available on the site. Stay up to date by following us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/HurricaneSandyCoastalRecovery or visit nad.usace.army.mil/Sandy.
Views: 725 CORPSCONNECTION
USACE builds super energy-efficient homes in Ansbach
 
01:36
A small garrison in northern Bavaria will soon be home to most energy efficient homes the U.S. Army has ever built. Foot-thick insulation, triple-paned fiberglass windows, and foam-sealed utilities are just some of the features these super energy-efficient homes - called Passivhäuser, or "Passive Houses" in English - will have. In total, the Corps will oversee the construction of 22 passive houses by late 2010 as part of a three-phased, $106 million family housing program that will ultimately place 206 new homes at the installation. Although the remaining 184 homes won't meet Passivhäus standards, they will adhere to German EnEV energy-saving standards, which are still more energy efficient than American standards.
Views: 1239 Europe District USACE
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Bay Model | Anything Interesting Ep. 5
 
11:09
On this episode we visit one of the most fascinating places in Northern California: The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers Bay Model. The model was built to test the John Reber plan and is still open for free to the public. Let us tell you all about the amazing place! Click here to learn more about the Bay Model: http://www.spn.usace.army.mil/Missions/Recreation/Bay-Model-Visitor-Center/ Follow Us: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/AnythingInterestingShow/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/Anyinterestshow Grason - @Grason5 Taylor - @TaylorsShelf Maddie - @DaKillidan Support the Show: https://www.patreon.com/anythinginteresting Logo Design: Bryan Koppelmann - @BryanKoppp Music (In order of appearance): "Silver" by Riot "Summer Driving Rock" by Bobby Cole "Americana" by Bobby Cole "She Wears Blue Jeans" by William Pearson & Lawrence Trainor "Malt Shop Bop" by Kevin MacLeod You're free to use this song and monetize your video, but you must include the following in your video description: Malt Shop Bop by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100496 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ "Days of Hope" by Neil Cross "Epic Souls" by Unknown Artist
The World Is Slowly Running Out Of Sand
 
03:22
I never thought of sand as a non-renewable resource, but there's only a limited supply: and to make things worse, it keeps getting washed into the sea. At Cape May, New Jersey, the US Army Corps of Engineers have just finished rebuilding a beach: here's why. Thanks to the folks from the Corps for showing me around! There's more about their project here: http://www.nap.usace.army.mil/Missions/Factsheets/Fact-Sheet-Article-View/Article/490778/new-jersey-shore-protection-cape-may-inlet-to-lower-township/ I'm at http://tomscott.com on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tomscott on Facebook at http://facebook.com/tomscott and on Snapchat and Instagram as tomscottgo CAMERA AND DRONE OP: Osprey Perspectives, http://www.ospreyperspectives.com/ EDITOR: Michelle Martin, @mrsmmartin And thanks to Elmo Keep for linking to the article that inspired this video! REFERENCES: Leatherman, S., Zhang, K. and Douglas, B. (2000). Sea level rise shown to drive coastal erosion. Eos, Transactions American Geophysical Union, 81(6), p.55. Peduzzi, P. (2014). Sand, rarer than one thinks. Environmental Development / United Nations Environmental Program, 11, pp.208-218. : http://www.unep.org/pdf/UNEP_GEAS_March_2014.pdf Zhang, G., Song, J., Yang, J. and Liu, X. (2006). Performance of mortar and concrete made with a fine aggregate of desert sand. Building and Environment, 41(11), pp.1478-1481. Beiser, V. (2015). The Deadly Global War for Sand. Wired. https://www.wired.com/2015/03/illegal-sand-mining/ Beiser, V. (2016). The World’s Disappearing Sand. The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/23/opinion/the-worlds-disappearing-sand.html
Views: 924288 Tom Scott
NAVFAC Safety Training Module 21: Fall Protection
 
01:18:42
Chapter 21 - Fall Protection: This video reviews the general requirements for fall protection and fall protection systems as specified in the Army Corps of Engineer EM385-1-1 Safety and Health Manual.
Tallest Building in USACE
 
01:43
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers New York District is managing design and construction of the $1.08 billion Department of Defense Office Complex (BRAC 133). It is part of 2005 Base Realignment and Closure programs on and around Fort Belvoir, Va. www.usace.army.mil
Views: 736 CORPSCONNECTION
USACE People Jim Ernst, Dam Operator
 
02:06
Jim Ernst is a dam operator at the Los Angeles District's Sante Fe Dam, Irwindale, Ca. Ernst was recently highlighted in USACE Engineer Minute program and the Corps Building Strong People campaign. (USACE video by Brooks O. Hubbard IV)
Views: 1575 Los Angeles District
New Gates For The Chicago Harbor Locks - January 2011
 
00:39
New gates for the Chicago Harbor Locks. Loaded on a barge and ready to be put in place. Army Corps of Engineers announces plan to repair, close Chicago Harbor lock http://www.lrc.usace.army.mil/chicagolock/press_release9-29-10.pdf "...This work will consist primarily of fabricating and installing four new curved structural steel sector gate leafs and associated hydraulic operating machinery. There will also be concrete rehabilitation and installation of electrical controls associated with the new sector gates. A contract for the work was awarded July 15, 2009 to James McHugh Construction for $14,752,000." I created this video at http://www.youtube.com/editor
Views: 383 Better With A Drone
Cross Florida Barge Canal - H. H.. Buckman Lock
 
06:25
Used to lift boats and barges from the level of the St. Johns River to the level of the Rodman Reservoir, about 18 feet above the mean sea level. The idea of such a canal was first proposed by Philip II of Spain in 1567. It was repeatedly considered over the years but found to be economically unviable. Secretary of War John C. Calhoun once again proposed a canal in 1818 in order to solve the losses due to shipwrecks and piracy. The Florida Railroad, finished on March 1, 1861, served a similar purpose, connecting theAtlantic Ocean at Fernandina to the Gulf of Mexico at Cedar Key. In the 1930s, regional politicians lobbied the federal government to fund canal construction as an economic recovery program, including the creation of the Canal Authority of the State of Florida in May 1933.[3] President Franklin D. Roosevelt allocated $5 million in emergency funds in 1935.[4] Local opponents of the canal protested that the canal would deplete Florida's aquifers, and work was stopped a year later. Work was reauthorized in 1942 as a national defense project, with dams and locks to protect the underground water supply. Support for the project from Washington was sporadic, and funds were never allocated to USACE to actually start construction. Planning was once again given the go-ahead in 1963 with support from president John F. Kennedy, who allocated one million dollars to the project. The next year, Lyndon Johnson set off the explosives that started construction. It was hoped that the canal, along with the St. Johns-Indian River Barge Canal, would provide a quicker and safer route across Florida by 1971. The project was officially cancelled in 1991.
Army Corps of Engineers: "Engineer Mission" 1953 US Army; The Big Picture TV-257
 
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The Big Picture TV Series playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_hX5wLdhf_Jwfz5l_3NRAcCYURbOW2Fl more at http://quickfound.net "Our camera turns to the Corps of Engineers to tell the story of past and present accomplishments and what the Army Engineers mean to our nation in peace and war. The Corps of Engineers is now 179 years old with a proud record of service behind it. But as this film presentation shows, there is nothing old about its spirit as its personnel, both civilian and military, look forward eagerly to future accomplishments." "The Big Picture" episode TV-257 Originally a public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE, also sometimes shortened to CoE) is a U.S. federal agency under the Department of Defense and a major Army command made up of some 37,000 civilian and military personnel, making it one of the world's largest public engineering, design, and construction management agencies. Although generally associated with dams, canals and flood protection in the United States, USACE is involved in a wide range of public works throughout the world. The Corps of Engineers provides outdoor recreation opportunities to the public, and provides 24% of U.S. hydropower capacity. The corps' mission is to "Deliver vital public and military engineering services; partnering in peace and war to strengthen our Nation's security, energize the economy and reduce risks from disasters." Their most visible missions include: - Planning, designing, building, and operating locks and dams. Other civil engineering projects include flood control, beach nourishment, and dredging for waterway navigation. - Design and construction of flood protection systems through various federal mandates. - Design and construction management of military facilities for the Army, Air Force, Army Reserve and Air Force Reserve and other Defense and Federal agencies. - Environmental regulation and ecosystem restoration. The corps' vision is "Engineering solutions for our Nation's toughest challenges."... Early history The history of United States Army Corps of Engineers can be traced back to 16 June 1775, when the Continental Congress organized an army with a chief engineer and two assistants. Colonel Richard Gridley became General George Washington's first chief engineer; however, it was not until 1779 that Congress created a separate Corps of Engineers. One of its first tasks was to build fortifications near Boston at Bunker Hill. The first corps was mostly composed of French subjects who had been hired by General Washington from the service of Louis XVI. The Corps of Engineers, as it is known today, came into existence on 16 March 1802, when President Thomas Jefferson was authorized to "organize and establish a Corps of Engineers ... that the said corps ... shall be stationed at West Point in the State of New York and shall constitute a military academy." Until 1866, the superintendent of the United States Military Academy was always an engineer officer. During the first half of the 19th century, West Point was the major and, for a while, the only engineering school in the country... During World War II, the Army Corps of Engineers in the European Theater of Operations was responsible for building countless bridges,including the first and longest floating tactical bridge across the Rhine at Remagen, and building or maintaining roads vital to the Allied advance across Europe into the heart of Germany. In the Pacific theater, the Pioneer troops were formed, a hand-selected unit of volunteer Army combat engineers trained in jungle warfare, knife fighting, and unarmed jujitsu (hand-to-hand combat) techniques. Working in camouflage, the Pioneers cleared jungle and prepared routes of advance and established bridgeheads for the infantry as well as demolishing enemy installations. Five commanding generals (chiefs of staff after the 1903 reorganization) of the United States Army held engineer commissions early in their careers. All transferred to other branches before rising to the top. They were Alexander Macomb, George B. McClellan, Henry W. Halleck, Douglas MacArthur, and Maxwell D. Taylor...
Views: 1854 Jeff Quitney
Advanced Modeling Requirements and Implementation
 
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In January 2016, Engineering and Construction Bulleting 2016-3 was released which continues the requirements for using of "Building Information Modeling" and "Civil Information Modeling" (BIM, & CIM, respectively) for our projects. Today we will learn the applicability of this criteria, the details of the requirements, as well as strategies for executing them. Your Host for this series is Eric Mucklow, AIA. We have two presenters to speak with us for this webinar: - Jason Fairchild, a registered Professional Engineer, is the leader of the CAD/BIM Community of Practice for HQ USACE, and as such is responsible for BIM policy and guidance. He has 25 years of experience with USACE, having proudly supported the Civil Works design construction mission for both the Vicksburg District and the Mississippi Valley Division prior to joining Headquarters in 2011. - Brandon Tobias is a registered Architect at Q USACE and currently manages the development and implementation of Advanced Modeling initiatives for Military Programs within Engineering & the Construction Division. He has 12 years Federal experience with design, construction, contingency construction and BIM implementation.
Views: 183 USACEsustainability
Debris removal continues after Hurricane Sandy
 
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The US Army Corps of Engineers were mission assigned by FEMA to manage debris removal from Hurricane Sandy. The collection and transfer of debris from the local streets to barge transfer upstate to landfills is explained by Colonel Trey Jordan, Commander of Recovery Field Office for USACE and Bob Karlen, Quality Assurance Officer also with USACE.
Views: 3001 FEMA