Home
Search results “Victor snap caps for valve stems”
How to insert valve stems into wheel rims
 
03:08
Replacing the valve stems in your wheel rims can prove tricky for the amateur. This technique may help. This was done on my go kart rims. Please post a response if you know a better way.
Views: 135584 Svend Petersen
REPLACING TYRE VALVES - Wonder Italia
 
03:39
Wonder guide for tyre specialists. A detailed tutorial video with tips and suggestions on how to correctly replace Wonder SNAP-IN and CLAMP-IN tyre valves. Find more on www.wonder-italia.it. SNAP-IN VALVE: http://youtu.be/dzlgcbBq_uQ?t=8s SNAP-IN with TPMS: http://youtu.be/dzlgcbBq_uQ?t=1m40s CLAMP-IN VALVE: http://youtu.be/dzlgcbBq_uQ?t=2m15s
Views: 4283 Wonder Italia
Oxygen-Acetylene: "What Could Possibly Go Wrong?!" - Kevin Caron
 
06:51
From http://www.kevincaron.com - Artist Kevin Caron shares some of the things you want to do - and not do - when using an oxygen-acetylene torch .... A viewer wrote and asked Caron about some of the things to look at, be aware of - what could possibly go wrong - with an oxygen-acetylene torch, which both welds and cuts. One of the first things to do when you buy a new oxygen-acetylene unit or set one back up after a while, is to inspect your hoses, especially where they make sharp bends, such as near the regulator. Look for any cracks in the liner. If they're cracked, get rid of them. Don't even keep them around. They could start to leak and cause a fire, and then, as Caron says, "You're running out the door with your hair on fire and making all kinds of weird noises." Next, Caron recommends you check your whole system for leaks every time you get the unit out to use it. Put some water and a few drops of dish soap into a squirt bottle. Turn on your valves to get pressure in the system, and spray all of your connections, even on the torch handle and body itself. If bubbles appear, you have a leak. Turn everything off and fix any leaks. Another thing to keep in mind when using an oxygen-acetylene torch is that you have plenty of hose. Don't bring the bottles right next to where you are working. If you do, your hose usually ends up coiled beneath you where sparks and molten metal are falling, and you have two bottles that are basically bombs sitting right next to you. Keep the gas bottles at a distance, and extend the hose so you're not tripping on it or dripping hot metal on it. Also be careful to use the right safety gear. After all, you're dealing with explosive gases, molten metal and flying sparks. Caron emphasizes that you need dark safety glasses, not clear ones. You also need to wear leather gloves, preferably heavy welding gloves with gauntlets. Don't try to use work gloves that have mesh backs, which sparks go right through. Using the right gloves helps prevent burning yourself or setting your gloves on fire. Also wear cotton clothes or a leather apron or sleeves. Closed-toe leather shoes - not sneakers, not flip flops, not barefoot - are a must. Dress for the job so you don't get hurt. Another big discussion with oxygen-acetylene is how far you open the valves on the bottles. Caron likes to open his a quarter-turn, so if there is ever a problem, he can turn it off quickly and easily. The valve has a seal above and below the outlet. The bottom seal keeps the gas in the bottle and out of the regulator. As soon as you open the valve, it pressurizes the regulator. The top seal seals the shaft of the valve to keep gas from coming out of the top. So a lot of guys like to open the valve all the way and bottom that upper seal out at the top of the valve body. But if there's a problem, you have to turn the valve all the way off to shut it. Caron says there's a lot of controversy about this issue, and that people should do whatever works for them. Finally, when you're done using the unit, do you leave pressure in the system or bleed it off in the system between the valve and the torch itself? Caron likes to leave the pressure on for about a half hour. Then he can look at the gauges to make sure the readings haven't changed. If the pressure reading has dropped, he has a leak. If this happens, get that soapy water and find the leak. If the readings don't change, the system is tight, and you can open your torch and bleed off the pressure. One last thing: if you're not using your oxygen-actylene unit for a couple of days, put the safety caps on the bottles and remove your regulators and coil them up out of the way. You can leave the bottles chained to the cart, and put it out of the way. If you leave the regulators on and the torch cart gets knocked over, you have a good chance of snapping off the regulator or the valve. "That's not good," says Caron. Caron says he hopes that gives viewers something to think about - you can comment below the video. Please also subscribe to Channel Kevin and come out to Caron's site at http://www.kevincaron.com to see more how-to videos, Caron's sculptures and subscribe to his newsletter.
Views: 44828 Kevin Caron, Artist
Free to Play: The Movie (US)
 
01:15:44
FREE TO PLAY is a feature-length documentary that follows three professional gamers from around the world as they compete for a million dollar prize in the first Dota 2 International Tournament. In recent years, E Sports has surged in popularity to become one of the most widely-practiced forms of competitive sport today. A million dollar tournament changed the landscape of the gaming world and for those elite players at the top of their craft, nothing would ever be the same again. Produced by Valve, the film documents the challenges and sacrifices required of players to compete at the highest level.
Views: 5702936 Valve
Repair a leaking valve on a Tippmann 98 paintball gun
 
15:06
DYI. How to Repair a leaking valve on a Tippmann 98 paintball gun... This video shows how to disassemble and repair a valve on a Tippmann. This is the complete breakdown of a Tippmann 98 valve, and how to reassemble the valve. When working with high presser air components there is always risk and you are responsible for your own safety so be careful and use your brain. Tippmann guns are really easy to work on and the operation is also simple. The valve can only leak from two points the cup seal or the O-Ring, in this video you can replace both on your own.
Views: 49477 TheEbida
Broken Cylinder Valves
 
04:45
This video shows what can happen when cylinder vales are Dropped, Broken etc
Views: 548516 Cormetondive
how to remove a FlowTite Valve
 
00:45
how to remove a plastic flowtite valve.
Views: 77802 Pauls Workshop
Plastic Radiator Neck Reinforcement or Repair ? DIY Options Available at Mercedessource.com
 
06:05
Link to radiator neck DIY kits: https://mercedessource.com/store/search?keys=radiator%20neck Plastic tank radiator upper neck failure is all too common. Some have lost engines due to rapid coolant loss and severe overheating.. Others have "lucked out" like I did in the case of the 1990 300SL. Can you believe the radiator neck fell off in my hands in my shop with I removed the neck hose clamp. In this video I will discuss the old kit I have available to reinforce the neck BEFORE it breaks as well as the new kit I sell to fix a broken neck like you will see in this video. No actual repair details are shown in this video. Just a quick overview of the problem with before and after pictures of the R129 radiator neck repaired.
Views: 27315 Mercedessource
Mustang GT Ford Racing Intake Manifold Install (99-04 4.6L)
 
06:38
Click here for more info on the Ford Racing Intake Manifold → http://www.latemodelrestoration.com/item/M9424P46/999-04-Mustang-Gt-Pi-Intake-Manifold-Requires-Lrs-10153A Intake Manifold Gaskets → http://www.latemodelrestoration.com/item/LRS-9439A/1999-04-Mustang-Gt-46-2V-Intake-Manifold-To-Head-Gasket Thermostat Gasket → http://www.latemodelrestoration.com/item/LRS-8255A/96-04-Mustang-46L-2V-4V-Thermostat-Gasket Alternator Bracket → http://www.latemodelrestoration.com/item/LRS-10153A/99-04-Mustang-46-2V-Alternator-Bracket-For-Upgrade-Intake-With-Aluminum-Crossover If you own a 99-01 2 valve Mustang, then your car was plagued with a factory intake manifold that featured a plastic coolant crossover. This factory crossover was prone to cracking at the front molded seam, as well as the temperature sensor and rear heater hose connection would back out from the intake. To fix the problem, Ford took the exact design and added a cast aluminum crossover in 2002. Thorough changes were made to keep stress off of key mounting areas such as a redesigned alternator mount. So you 99-01 GT owners who could possibly still have the intake manifold with the plastic crossover, you’ll want to grab an upper alternator bracket when switching to the Ford Racing Intake Manifold. This manifold, of course, is a direct replacement for all 2002-2004 2 valve Mustangs since they were already outfitted with the redesigned manifold. A couple of other things you may want to grab while you’re at it, would be a new thermostat and intake manifold gaskets! Mustang Fitment → 1999 (99), 2000 (00), 2001 (01), 2002 (02), 2003 (03), 2004 (04) GT _____________________________________________________ Subscribe to our YouTube channel! → https://www.youtube.com/user/latemodelrestoration?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook → http://www.facebook.com/latemodelresto Instagram → http://instagram.com/latemodelresto Twitter → http://twitter.com/latemodel_resto Google + → http://plus.google.com/+Latemodelrestoration.com/posts Late Model Restoration SVE 5.0Resto
Views: 89801 Late Model Restoration
Suspense: Murder Aboard the Alphabet / Double Ugly / Argyle Album
 
01:28:05
The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29
Views: 128758 Remember This
Suspense: Tree of Life / The Will to Power / Overture in Two Keys
 
01:32:25
Alfred Hitchcock's first thriller was his third silent film The Lodger (1926), a suspenseful Jack the Ripper story. His next thriller was Blackmail (1929), his and Britain's first sound film. Of Hitchcock's fifteen major features made between 1925 and 1935, only six were suspense films, the two mentioned above plus Murder!, Number Seventeen, The Man Who Knew Too Much, and The 39 Steps. From 1935 on, however, most of his output was thrillers. One of the earliest spy films was Fritz Lang's Spies (1928), the director's first independent production, with an anarchist international conspirator and criminal spy character named Haghi (Rudolf Klein-Rogge), who was pursued by good-guy Agent No. 326 (Willy Fritsch) (aka Det. Donald Tremaine, English version) -- this film anticipated the James Bond films of the future. Another was Greta Garbo's portrayal of the real-life, notorious, seductive German double agent code-named Mata Hari (Gertrud Zelle) in World War I in Mata Hari (1932), who performed a pearl-draped dance to entice French officers to divulge their secrets. The chilling German film M (1931) directed by Fritz Lang, starred Peter Lorre (in his first film role) as a criminal deviant who preys on children. The film's story was based on the life of serial killer Peter Kurten (known as the 'Vampire of Düsseldorf'). Edward Sutherland's crime thriller Murders in the Zoo (1933) from Paramount starred Lionel Atwill as a murderous and jealous zoologist. Other British directors, such as Walter Forde, Victor Saville, George A. Cooper, and even the young Michael Powell made more thrillers in the same period; Forde made nine, Vorhaus seven between 1932 and 1935, Cooper six in the same period, and Powell the same. Hitchcock was following a strong British trend in his choice of genre. Notable examples of Hitchcock's early British suspense-thriller films include The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), his first spy-chase/romantic thriller, The 39 Steps (1935) with Robert Donat handcuffed to Madeleine Carroll and The Lady Vanishes (1938). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_thriller
Views: 233907 Remember This
Auburn Coach Wife Kristi Malzahn Agrees with Match & eHarmony: Men are Jerks
 
12:22
My advice is this: Settle! That's right. Don't worry about passion or intense connection. Don't nix a guy based on his annoying habit of yelling "Bravo!" in movie theaters. Overlook his halitosis or abysmal sense of aesthetics. Because if you want to have the infrastructure in place to have a family, settling is the way to go. Based on my observations, in fact, settling will probably make you happier in the long run, since many of those who marry with great expectations become more disillusioned with each passing year. (It's hard to maintain that level of zing when the conversation morphs into discussions about who's changing the diapers or balancing the checkbook.) Obviously, I wasn't always an advocate of settling. In fact, it took not settling to make me realize that settling is the better option, and even though settling is a rampant phenomenon, talking about it in a positive light makes people profoundly uncomfortable. Whenever I make the case for settling, people look at me with creased brows of disapproval or frowns of disappointment, the way a child might look at an older sibling who just informed her that Jerry's Kids aren't going to walk, even if you send them money. It's not only politically incorrect to get behind settling, it's downright un-American. Our culture tells us to keep our eyes on the prize (while our mothers, who know better, tell us not to be so picky), and the theme of holding out for true love (whatever that is—look at the divorce rate) permeates our collective mentality. Even situation comedies, starting in the 1970s with The Mary Tyler Moore Show and going all the way to Friends, feature endearing single women in the dating trenches, and there's supposed to be something romantic and even heroic about their search for true love. Of course, the crucial difference is that, whereas the earlier series begins after Mary has been jilted by her fiancé, the more modern-day Friends opens as Rachel Green leaves her nice-guy orthodontist fiancé at the altar simply because she isn't feeling it. But either way, in episode after episode, as both women continue to be unlucky in love, settling starts to look pretty darn appealing. Mary is supposed to be contentedly independent and fulfilled by her newsroom family, but in fact her life seems lonely. Are we to assume that at the end of the series, Mary, by then in her late 30s, found her soul mate after the lights in the newsroom went out and her work family was disbanded? If her experience was anything like mine or that of my single friends, it's unlikely. And while Rachel and her supposed soul mate, Ross, finally get together (for the umpteenth time) in the finale of Friends, do we feel confident that she'll be happier with Ross than she would have been had she settled down with Barry, the orthodontist, 10 years earlier? She and Ross have passion but have never had long-term stability, and the fireworks she experiences with him but not with Barry might actually turn out to be a liability, given how many times their relationship has already gone up in flames. It's equally questionable whether Sex and the City's Carrie Bradshaw, who cheated on her kindhearted and generous boyfriend, Aidan, only to end up with the more exciting but self-absorbed Mr. Big, will be better off in the framework of marriage and family. (Some time after the breakup, when Carrie ran into Aidan on the street, he was carrying his infant in a Baby Björn. Can anyone imagine Mr. Big walking around with a Björn?)
Views: 150739 Shari Wing
Suspense: I Won't Take a Minute / The Argyle Album / Double Entry
 
01:29:31
The program's heyday was in the early 1950s, when radio actor, producer and director Elliott Lewis took over (still during the Wilcox/Autolite run). Here the material reached new levels of sophistication. The writing was taut, and the casting, which had always been a strong point of the series (featuring such film stars as Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten, Henry Fonda, Humphrey Bogart, Judy Garland, Ronald Colman, Marlene Dietrich, Eve McVeagh, Lena Horne, and Cary Grant), took an unexpected turn when Lewis expanded the repertory to include many of radio's famous drama and comedy stars — often playing against type — such as Jack Benny. Jim and Marian Jordan of Fibber McGee and Molly were heard in the episode, "Backseat Driver," which originally aired February 3, 1949. The highest production values enhanced Suspense, and many of the shows retain their power to grip and entertain. At the time he took over Suspense, Lewis was familiar to radio fans for playing Frankie Remley, the wastrel guitar-playing sidekick to Phil Harris in The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show. On the May 10, 1951 Suspense, Lewis reversed the roles with "Death on My Hands": A bandleader (Harris) is horrified when an autograph-seeking fan accidentally shoots herself and dies in his hotel room, and a vocalist (Faye) tries to help him as the townfolk call for vigilante justice against him. With the rise of television and the departures of Lewis and Autolite, subsequent producers (Antony Ellis, William N. Robson and others) struggled to maintain the series despite shrinking budgets, the availability of fewer name actors, and listenership decline. To save money, the program frequently used scripts first broadcast by another noteworthy CBS anthology, Escape. In addition to these tales of exotic adventure, Suspense expanded its repertoire to include more science fiction and supernatural content. By the end of its run, the series was remaking scripts from the long-canceled program The Mysterious Traveler. A time travel tale like Robert Arthur's "The Man Who Went Back to Save Lincoln" or a thriller about a death ray-wielding mad scientist would alternate with more run-of-the-mill crime dramas. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29
Views: 159115 Remember This
Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea by Jules Verne | Part 1 of 2 |  Audiobook  with subtitles
 
08:15:06
Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea (Version 3) Jules VERNE , translated by F. P. WALTER Originally published 1870, this recording is from the English translation by Frederick P. Walter, published 1991, containing the unabridged text from the original French and offered up into the public domain. It is considered to be the very first science fiction novel ever written, the first novel about the undersea world, and is a classic science fiction novel by French writer Jules Verne published in 1870. It tells the story of Captain Nemo and his submarine Nautilus, as seen from the perspective of Professor Pierre Aronnax - Summary by Michele Fry Genre(s): Action & Adventure Fiction, Travel Fiction Chapters: 1:15 | Introduction 12:20 | 1-1. A Runaway Reef 29:22 | 1-2. The Pros and Cons 43:22 | 1-3. As Master Wishes 55:22 | 1-4. Ned Land 1:12:15 |1-5. At Random! 1:27:56 | 1-6. At Full Steam 1:48:13 |1-7. A Whale of Unknown Species 2:05:17 | 1-8. "Mobilis in Mobili" 2:24:49 | 1-9. The Tantrums of Ned Land 2:41:04 | 1-10. The Man Of The Waters 3:02:02 | 1-11. The Nautilus 3:21:39 |1-12. Everything through Electricity 3:38:19 | 1-13. Some Figures 3:55:10 |1-14. The Black Current 4:22:52 | 1-15. An Invitation in Writing 4:41:57 | 1-16. Strolling the Plains 4:57:14 | 1-17. An Underwater Forest 5:14:02 | 1-18. Four Thousand Leagues Under the Pacific 5:34:33 | 1-19. Vanikoro 5:59:28 | 1-20. The Torres Strait 6:19:46 | 1-21. Some Days Ashore 6:44:41 | 1-22. The Lightning Bolts of Captain Nemo 7:09:26 |1-23. "Aegri Somnia" 7:29:58 | 1-24. The Coral Realm 7:49:50 | 2-1. The Indian Ocean Our Custom URL : https://www.youtube.com/c/AudiobookAudiobooks Subscribe To Our Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/AudiobookAudiobooks?sub_confirmation=1 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 1154 Audio book Audiobooks
Chapter 10 - Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery - Anne's Apology
 
13:25
Chapter 10: Anne's Apology. Classic Literature VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Audio courtesy of Librivox. Read by Karen Savage. Playlist For Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL808493A4847967FA Anne of Green Gables free audiobook at Librivox: http://librivox.org/anne-of-green-gables-by-lucy-maud-montgomery-3/ Anne of Green Gables free eBook at Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/45 Anne of Green Gables at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_of_Green_Gables View a list of all our videobooks: http://www.ccprose.com/booklist
Views: 11199 CCProse
Calling All Cars: The Broken Motel / Death in the Moonlight / The Peroxide Blond
 
01:28:22
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Views: 83220 Remember This
Кондиционеры Вентиляция -"Грин-Климат" Харьков
 
02:38
Компания "Грин-Климат" на рынке климатического оборудования более 6 лет. Приобретенный нами опыт, позволяет решать технически сложные задачи в кратчайший срок и с надлежащим качеством. Обеспечим весь спектр услуг, связанных с продажей, установкой и сервисом систем кондиционирования, отопления и вентиляции. Наши работники обладают высокой квалификацией - это позволяет нам предоставлять длительный гарантийный срок на выполненные нами работы. Предлагаем: - бытовые и полупромышленные кондиционеры (Daikin, Gree, Panasonic, Mitsubishi Heavy, Mitsubishi Electric, LG, Samsung, Toshiba, Sensei, NeoClima, Hitachi, Fuji и др.) - воздушные и тепловые завесы (NeoClima, Тепломаш, FRICO, Systemair, Thermoscreens, Ballu, Mitsushito и др.) - тепловые насосы Mitsubishi Electric серии ZUBADAN - приточно-вытяжные установки Mitsubishi Electric LOSSNAY
Views: 8679 Грин Климат
Our Miss Brooks: English Test / First Aid Course / Tries to Forget / Wins a Man's Suit
 
01:47:30
Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name. Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show's first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series' run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win. Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks' references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show's running gags. Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks' affections. Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks' absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts. Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father's malevolence and dishonesty. Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter's best friend. Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks. Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher. Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks
Views: 59911 Remember This
Calling All Cars: Desperate Choices / Perfumed Cigarette Lighter / Man Overboard
 
01:27:25
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Views: 55582 Remember This
The Great Gildersleeve: Bronco's Aunt Victoria / New Secretary / Gildy the Pianist
 
01:29:31
Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 76379 Remember This
Calling All Cars: Ghost House / Death Under the Saquaw / The Match Burglar
 
01:27:24
The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is the police department of the city of Los Angeles, California. The LAPD has been copiously fictionalized in numerous movies, novels and television shows throughout its history. The department has also been associated with a number of controversies, mainly concerned with racial animosity, police brutality and police corruption. The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Views: 44818 Remember This
The Great Gildersleeve: The Campaign Heats Up / Who's Kissing Leila / City Employee's Picnic
 
01:29:30
The Great Gildersleeve (1941--1957), initially written by Leonard Lewis Levinson, was one of broadcast history's earliest spin-off programs. Built around Throckmorton Philharmonic Gildersleeve, a character who had been a staple on the classic radio situation comedy Fibber McGee and Molly, first introduced on Oct. 3, 1939, ep. #216. The Great Gildersleeve enjoyed its greatest success in the 1940s. Actor Harold Peary played the character during its transition from the parent show into the spin-off and later in a quartet of feature films released at the height of the show's popularity. On Fibber McGee and Molly, Peary's Gildersleeve was a pompous windbag who became a consistent McGee nemesis. "You're a haa-aa-aa-aard man, McGee!" became a Gildersleeve catchphrase. The character was given several conflicting first names on Fibber McGee and Molly, and on one episode his middle name was revealed as Philharmonic. Gildy admits as much at the end of "Gildersleeve's Diary" on the Fibber McGee and Molly series (Oct. 22, 1940). He soon became so popular that Kraft Foods—looking primarily to promote its Parkay margarine spread — sponsored a new series with Peary's Gildersleeve as the central, slightly softened and slightly befuddled focus of a lively new family. Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 105758 Remember This
The Great Gildersleeve: New Neighbors / Letters to Servicemen / Leroy Sells Seeds
 
01:25:07
The Great Gildersleeve (1941--1957), initially written by Leonard Lewis Levinson, was one of broadcast history's earliest spin-off programs. Built around Throckmorton Philharmonic Gildersleeve, a character who had been a staple on the classic radio situation comedy Fibber McGee and Molly, first introduced on Oct. 3, 1939, ep. #216. The Great Gildersleeve enjoyed its greatest success in the 1940s. Actor Harold Peary played the character during its transition from the parent show into the spin-off and later in a quartet of feature films released at the height of the show's popularity. On Fibber McGee and Molly, Peary's Gildersleeve was a pompous windbag who became a consistent McGee nemesis. "You're a haa-aa-aa-aard man, McGee!" became a Gildersleeve catchphrase. The character was given several conflicting first names on Fibber McGee and Molly, and on one episode his middle name was revealed as Philharmonic. Gildy admits as much at the end of "Gildersleeve's Diary" on the Fibber McGee and Molly series (Oct. 22, 1940). Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 38003 Remember This
Chapter 10 - The Lost World by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle - The Most Wonderful Things Have Happened
 
32:06
Chapter 10: The Most Wonderful Things Have Happened. Classic Literature VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Audio courtesy of Librivox. Read by Mark F. Smith. Playlist for The Lost World by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5F6663B676A43390 The Lost World free audiobook at Librivox: http://librivox.org/the-lost-world-by-sir-arthur-conan-doyle/ The Lost World free eBook at Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/139 The Lost World at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lost_World_%28Arthur_Conan_Doyle%29 View a list of all our videobooks: http://www.ccprose.com/booklist
Views: 69884 CCProse
Part 1 - Tom Swift and His Motor Boat Audiobook by Victor Appleton (Chs 1-12)
 
02:05:55
Part 1 (Chs 1-12). Book number 2 in the Tom Swift series. First published in 1910. Children's VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Read by Mike Vendetti: http://goo.gl/4nrYv Playlist for: Tom Swift and His Motor Boat by Victor Appleton: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD4492CE2EE6B2A9B
Views: 70913 CCProseKids
The Great Gildersleeve: The Manganese Mine / Testimonial Dinner for Judge / The Sneezes
 
01:29:31
The Great Gildersleeve (1941--1957), initially written by Leonard Lewis Levinson, was one of broadcast history's earliest spin-off programs. Built around Throckmorton Philharmonic Gildersleeve, a character who had been a staple on the classic radio situation comedy Fibber McGee and Molly, first introduced on Oct. 3, 1939, ep. #216. The Great Gildersleeve enjoyed its greatest success in the 1940s. Actor Harold Peary played the character during its transition from the parent show into the spin-off and later in a quartet of feature films released at the height of the show's popularity. On Fibber McGee and Molly, Peary's Gildersleeve was a pompous windbag who became a consistent McGee nemesis. "You're a haa-aa-aa-aard man, McGee!" became a Gildersleeve catchphrase. The character was given several conflicting first names on Fibber McGee and Molly, and on one episode his middle name was revealed as Philharmonic. Gildy admits as much at the end of "Gildersleeve's Diary" on the Fibber McGee and Molly series (Oct. 22, 1940). Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 49600 Remember This
The Great Gildersleeve: Gildy Meets Nurse Milford / Double Date with Marjorie / The Expectant Father
 
01:29:30
Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 74723 Remember This
The Great Gildersleeve: Bronco and Marjorie Engaged / Hayride / Engagement Announcement
 
01:29:30
Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 59468 Remember This
Part 7 - Scaramouche Audiobook by Rafael Sabatini - Book 3 (Chs 05-09)
 
02:25:39
A Romance of the French Revolution - Book 3: The Sword, (Chs 05-09). Classic Literature VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Audio courtesy of Librivox. Read by Gord Mackenzie. Playlist for Scaramouche by Rafael Sabatini: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6105020F8342233A Scaramouche free audiobook at Librivox: http://librivox.org/scaramouche-by-rafael-sabatini/ Scaramouche free eBook at Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/1947 Scaramouche at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scaramouche View a list of all our videobooks: http://www.ccprose.com/booklist
Views: 65489 CCProse
Part 6 - Wuthering Heights Audiobook by Emily Bronte (Chs 29-34)
 
02:22:35
Part 6. Classic Literature VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Audio courtesy of Librivox. Read by Ruth Golding. Playlist for Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA85870E70F5AB987 Wuthering Heights free audiobook at Librivox: http://librivox.org/wuthering-heights-by-emily-bronte-2/ Wuthering Heights free eBook at Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/768 Wuthering Heights at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wuthering_Heights View a list of all our videobooks: http://www.ccprose.com/booklist
Views: 143742 CCProse
Part 2 - The Invisible Man Audiobook by H. G. Wells (Chs 18-28)
 
02:14:31
Part 2. Classic Literature VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Audio courtesy of Librivox. Read by Alex Foster. Playlist for The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL10B89CB3B6D86CA2 The Invisible Man free audiobook at Librivox: http://librivox.org/invisible-man-by-h-g-wells/ The Invisible Man free eBook at Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/5230 The Invisible Man at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Invisible_Man View a list of all our videobooks: http://www.ccprose.com/booklist
Views: 579525 CCProse
Part 5 - Triplanetary Audiobook by E. E. Smith (Chs 18-19)
 
01:11:05
Part 5 (Chs 18-19). Classic Literature VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Audio courtesy of Librivox. Read by Phil Chenevert. Playlist for Triplanetary by E. E. Smith: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL118F0DC0F36A7454 Triplanetary free audiobook at Librivox: http://librivox.org/triplanetary-first-in-the-lensman-series-by-e-e-doc-smith/ Triplanetary free eBook at Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/32706 Triplanetary at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triplanetary_%28novel%29 View a list of all our videobooks: http://www.ccprose.com/booklist
Views: 40526 CCProse
Chapter 081-082 - Moby Dick by Herman Melville
 
36:17
Chapters 81-82. Classic Literature VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Audio courtesy of Librivox. Read by Stewart Wills. Playlist for Moby Dick by Herman Melville: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLED9C3C800166B986 Moby Dick free audiobook at Librivox: http://librivox.org/moby-dick-by-herman-melville/ Moby Dick free eBook at Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/2701 Moby Dick at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moby-Dick View a list of all our videobooks: http://www.ccprose.com/booklist
Views: 62628 CCProse
Part 2 - The Lost World Audiobook by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Chs 08-12)
 
03:07:39
Part 2. Classic Literature VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Audio courtesy of Librivox. Read by Mark F. Smith. Playlist for The Lost World by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF81BFA1A19F2998D The Lost World free audiobook at Librivox: http://librivox.org/the-lost-world-by-sir-arthur-conan-doyle/ The Lost World free eBook at Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/139 The Lost World at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Lost_World_%28Arthur_Conan_Doyle%29 View a list of all our videobooks: http://www.ccprose.com/booklist
Views: 532338 CCProse
Part 3 - The House of Mirth Audiobook by Edith Wharton (Book 1 - Chs 11-15)
 
02:18:21
Part 3. Classic Literature VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Audio courtesy of Librivox. Read by Elizabeth Klett. Playlist for The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBD24EF103887BD1B The House of Mirth free audiobook at Librivox: http://librivox.org/the-house-of-mirth-by-edith-wharton/ The House of Mirth free eBook at Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/284 The House of Mirth at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_House_of_Mirth View a list of all our videobooks: http://www.ccprose.com/booklist
Views: 225077 CCProse
Part 1 - Triplanetary Audiobook by E. E. Smith (Chs 1-4)
 
02:16:44
Part 1 (Chs 1-4). Classic Literature VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Audio courtesy of Librivox. Read by Phil Chenevert. Playlist for Triplanetary by E. E. Smith: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL118F0DC0F36A7454 Triplanetary free audiobook at Librivox: http://librivox.org/triplanetary-first-in-the-lensman-series-by-e-e-doc-smith/ Triplanetary free eBook at Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/32706 Triplanetary at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triplanetary_%28novel%29 View a list of all our videobooks: http://www.ccprose.com/booklist
Views: 275549 CCProse
Part 07 - Moby Dick Audiobook by Herman Melville (Chs 078-088)
 
02:17:08
Part 7. Classic Literature VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Audio courtesy of Librivox. Read by Stewart Wills. Playlist for Moby Dick by Herman Melville: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3488B73A45D1DF78 Moby Dick free audiobook at Librivox: http://librivox.org/moby-dick-by-herman-melville/ Moby Dick free eBook at Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/2701 Moby Dick at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moby-Dick View a list of all our videobooks: http://www.ccprose.com/booklist
Views: 461675 CCProse